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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


Workstations For The Trades

Construction Zone workstations help students acquire construction skills right in the classroom
and excite them about high-paying jobs in the construction industry.

The Construction Zone product line consists of 33 workstations representing 25 different skilled trades. Each workstation includes a ten hour, hands on work experience and comes complete with curriculum, professional tools, equipment, and supplies.

Curriculum with full color photographs guides the students through the hands-on activities and provides information about the trade as a career.  Math, science, reading, and writing skills are integrated into the curriculum to give students real world examples of their use in daily life and on the job site.


Technology in Action

Technology Phobia

All of us suffer from some sort of phobia, be it high places, closed areas, water, etc., and for most of these there is a cure. The phobia affecting many people over the past 40 to 50 years is Technology Phobia, or the uncertainty of how technology would affect their lives and their work.
Let us be honest with ourselves; all of us suffer from technology phobia to some degree or another.

Are You a Winner ?

a Winner says, “Let’s find out”
a loser says, “nobody knows”


when a Winner makes a mistake he says,

“I was wrong”
when a loser makes a mistake he says,

“it wasn't my fault”


a Winner goes through a problem.
a loser goes around it, and never gets past it.
 

a Winner makes commitments.
a loser makes promises.


a Winner says “ I’m good,
but not as good as I ought to be”


a loser says

“I'm not as bad as a lot of other people”


a Winner tries to learn from those who are superior.
a loser tries to tear down those who are superior.


a Winner says “There ought to be a better way”
a loser says “That’s the way its always been done here”


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
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Follow The Money

National Education Foundation Launches STEM Grant Program

In order to improve the critical STEM education in the nation’s K-12 schools, National Education Foundation (NEF), the national non-profit leader in bridging the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) divides, has launched a multimillion dollar grant program in partnership with TEKSystems and Pearson.

Any school district/school with 35% or more students on Free/Reduced cost lunch is eligible. Apply at http://www.cyberlearning.org/adoptgrant. NEF will award 100 grants in 2013-14 school year, with at least one in each state.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

The Path Less Taken: Barriers to Providing Career and Technical Education at Community Colleges

This report produced by Diane Auer Jones for the American Enterprise Institute, provides discussion on the type of post-secondary degree programs perceptions and significance to earnings. Findings include:

-The earnings associated with post-secondary education vary significantly based on one’s major and career path, among other things.

-Some certificate and associate degree programs in technical and allied health fields at community colleges can result in higher earnings than some bachelor’s degree programs.

-Despite evidence that vocational sub-baccalaureate certificates and degrees have a relatively high payoff, liberal arts and general studies programs have experienced the most rapid growth in community college enrollments and credentials. This may partially explain the mismatch between graduates’ skills and the skills employers demand.

-Community colleges face tremendous structural and policy barriers when trying to create new or expand existing vocational programs, including funding allocation formulas, accreditation requirements, federal regulations, transfer-of-credit policies, and stigmatization of occupational and vocational programs.


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

Accelerate STEM Innovation with FREE Ed Tech Tools

It is generally accepted that one can not design education today to prepare young people and adults for the future because we do not know what the future will be. Today, technology has zoomed past schools, industry, government, consumers and civil society. The modern world needs a new way, or more accurately, an old way of seeing technology. 

The question is not whether we can design for the future; rather, the question is: Can we update antiquated practice more closely aligned to what is emerging today in our own backyards?

 

News

Apprenticeship and Work-Based Learning, Solutions for a Stronger Economy

America’s most famous youth apprentice, Ben Franklin (a printer’s apprentice at age 12), reputedly described the basic learning process of apprenticeship this way: “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” This aphorism fits 19-year-old New Orleanian Da’Jonae Curtis. Although she was valedictorian of her high school class in 2016, she had no interest in post-secondary education: “I knew that I didn’t want to go to school—I was just done with school.” Instead, Da’Jonae found Earn and Learn and is about to complete her job placement with Tulane’s HVAC department. “I was kind of skeptical [of HVAC work] at first. It was something I never thought about doing,” she says. But after almost eight months on the job, Da’Jonae is proud of the certifications she’s earned and looking forward to an externship. Da’Jonae describes what she likes about work-based learning: I like that it’s very hands on.


More Cars and Fewer People to Fix Them

It's a concern shared by most of the nation's roughly 16,700 new car dealerships whose profits are increasingly reliant on servicing the vehicles they sell, and less reliant on profits from the sales of the vehicles themselves. Dealerships are sacrificing margin on sales in favor of putting more cars on the road. More cars on the road lead to more cars in the service bays, and that means more qualified mechanics are needed.

New car dealerships sold a record 17.5 million new cars in 2016, as well as nearly 15 million used cars: 37 percent of the total of all used cars sold.

Service, parts and body shop activity accounted for 47.3 percent of the average dealership's gross profits in 2016, according to a study by the National Automobile Dealers Association, up from the 45.4 percent the previous year.


Career Tech Courses Becoming Core Subjects

The job market is shifting so that most traditional “trade” paths require a greater understanding of STEM courses and communication, requiring administrators and teachers to find more ways to incorporate this knowledge into career and technical education (CTE) tracts, District Administration reports.

•Traditional CTE pathways often now require post-secondary education, but the need for four-year degrees is diminishing as only about 23% of occupations require it — which means higher education institutions may need to spend more resources in promoting the idea of going to college.

•Students need to be exposed to a variety of career pathways in elementary and middle school so that they can begin thinking not only about their career goals but also about the courses they will need to get there, an approach that results in higher graduation rates.

 


Alabama Manufacturing Certifications will Create Educational Pipeline to Jobs

Alabama Community College System is teaming up with the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council to offer industry certifications. Alabama will be the first state to offer the council’s certification across its public colleges, state officials said.

A significant number of people in the state -- about 22 percent of the state’s work force -- are in manufacturing and transportation, said Jeff Lynn, vice chancellor of work force and economic development for the community college system. Yet more coordination was needed, he said.

“Around the state, I didn’t see a steady, strong work-force pipeline plan,” said Lynn.


National Certifications for Robotics and Advanced Automation

The industry-education certifications are the result of an 18-month collaboration of more than 150 subject matter experts from FANUC America, industry, automation system integrators, and leading advisors and instructors from high schools, community colleges, and universities. Participants focused on the need to prepare a talent pipeline of workers who possess the core competencies and automation technology skills to work in high-tech manufacturing.

Since 2010, FANUC has lead the effort to address the critical challenge caused by a shortage of skilled workers, and helped change the perceptions of careers in manufacturing. The new industry-leading certifications provide students and companies with measurable skill sets aligned with today’s advanced automation technologies, increasing workforce readiness at all levels.


$200 Million from DOE Backed Up By $300 Million from Corporations Supporting STEM Education

Many of the country’s largest tech companies, including Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Salesforce, pledged a total of $300 million for computer science education, part of a partnership meant to prepare students for careers in technology. The corporate donations follow a White House effort to direct federal money toward teacher training and resources that bolster science, technology, engineering and math. President Trump directed the Education Department to put $200 million in grant money toward computer science education.

Many of the companies involved in the computer science initiative have been pushing to increase computer training in schools. Tech companies see the STEM fields, and computer science in particular, as a weakness in American education and have pressed for coding and other classes to be bolstered to keep the United States competitive with nations that are pulling ahead in those areas.


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Competitions

12th Annual eCYBERMISSION Competition

The12th annual eCYBERMISSION, one of several science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) initiatives offered by the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), sponsored by the U.S. Army and administered by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), is a free online learning competition designed to cultivate student interest in STEM by encouraging students in grades six through nine to develop solutions to real-world challenges in their local communities. Students can win on a state, regional, and national level, with national winning teams receiving up to $8,000 in U.S.


Hand Biometrics Technology

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering, Design
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Hand Biometrics Technology lesson not only explores how engineers incorporate biometrics technologies into products, but also explores the challenges of engineers who must weigh privacy, security and other issues when designing a system. Students explore different biometrics techniques, find their own hand geometry biometrics, then work in teams of "engineers" to design a high-tech security system for a museum. 
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on engineering applications of biometric technologies for identification or security applications. After exploring hand geometry biometrics, students work in teams of "engineers" to evaluate pros and cons of incorporating a hand recognition biometric technology into a new security system for a museum.  
 
Lesson Activities 
 
Students learn how biometrics technologies have been used worldwide to address security and identification systems. Student teams are then challenged with evaluating and deciding whether a hand geometry-based biometric technology would be the right choice for admitting employees to a museum. Student teams present their recommendations to other teams.  
 
Lesson Objectives 
 
Learn about biometrics technology.
Learn about engineering product planning and design.
Learn about meeting the needs of society.
Learn about teamwork and working in groups.
 

Foundations

Honeywell, NASA and The Department of Defense Education Activity Join Forces to Provide STEM Focused Educational Assistance

"It is critically important to get middle school-aged students aware of and excited about STEM topics—especially physics. We've seen FMA Live! make the introduction easier," said Donald James, NASA's associate administrator for Education. "Thanks to our collaboration with Honeywell, we're inspiring students to set their sights on future careers in the critical STEM field."

Each performance focuses on Newton's Universal Law of Gravity and Three Laws of Motion. Named after Newton's Second Law of Motion [Force equals Mass times Acceleration], FMA Live! uses music videos and interactive scientific demonstrations to teach and inspire students to pursue STEM careers.

Forces In Motion

Employment