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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


How 3D Printing in Education Improves Learning

With the advent of affordable 3d printers like the DaVinci 1.0 (costs less than $500 in the USA), we wanted to see how this technology can best benefit education. Studica is always looking for ways to help education customers marry new technologies with their teaching goals, to help create a stronger learning experience for students.


Technology in Action

Economic Facts Everyone Should Know

The following set of facts are called the Ten Pillars of Economic Wisdom. These basic laws of economics were developed by The Economic Foundation of New York. It might be called a guide for human's economic life. These ten rules show how simply the economic truth can be told.


Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
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Follow The Money

$500 Million in Community College Grants for Training Programs. Click (READ MORE) for State allocations.

$500 million in grants to community colleges and universities around the country for the development and expansion of innovative training programs. The grants are part of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training initiative, which promotes skills development and employment opportunities in fields such as advanced manufacturing, transportation and health care, as well as science, technology, engineering and math careers through partnerships between training providers and local employers. The U.S. Department of Labor is implementing and administering the program in coordination with the U.S. Department of Education.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS INDUSTRY WORKFORCE UPDATE

Electronic systems could include just about anything that plugs in or has batteries. There are electronic systems in automobiles and aircraft, and even spacecraft. But in general the term is applied to low voltage systems and subsystems installed in buildings. Not to be confused with the work done by electricians, this includes low-voltage technologies such as audio, video, control systems, security and surveillance, and the infrastructure that supports these systems – copper, fiber optic, and wireless. Much of the same technology is applied to both residential and commercial projects, but used differently depending on the application. The companies who design and install these complex systems are essentially integrating several subsystems into one, so you will often see them referred to as systems integrators. The personnel who install, service, and upgrade these systems in the field are known as Electronic Systems Technicians (ESTs).

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

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The Art of the Future

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The Art of the Future

These are stories of high school students and teachers (and public and private partners acting through networks) to do “real world” scientific research and development (R&D) and engineering design. This is the new face of advanced technological education in America’s high schools and community colleges. Job profiles are provided by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education initiative.


News

Raising the Bar: State Strategies for Developing and Approving High-Quality Career Pathways

This report from Advance CTE examines successes in Tennessee, New Jersey and Delaware to demonstrate how states can use the career pathways approval process to raise the level of quality across the board.

Examples of strong programs of study — and career pathways, more broadly — exist in every state. Yet all too often these career pathways are islands of excellence, setting the bar for quality, but requiring further state action to ensure all students can benefit from strong career pathways. While the approach to developing career pathways varies across the nation, state leaders can play a role in promoting quality by leveraging policy, programs and resources to ensure all career pathways meet minimum standards.

 

Raising The Bar

"Going Pro" in Michigan. State Agency's Join Resources to Promote CTE and Fill the Skills Gap

“Going PRO” is a Michigan campaign designed to elevate the perception of professional trades and to showcase opportunities in a variety of rewarding careers.

A sizable professional trades shortage exists in Michigan and is expected to continue through 2024. Professional trades will account for more than 500,000 jobs in the Michigan economy, and approximately 15,000 new job openings are expected annually in the state during that time.

Wages for professional trades occupations is 45 percent higher than other occupations – $51,000 is the median annual salary for these jobs!

Opportunities exist in a variety of emerging industries including IT, healthcare, advanced manufacturing, construction and automotive. And many of the career fields do not require a four-year degree.

Go Pro Michigan

Work in the Automation Age: Sustainable Careers Today and Into the Future

80% of manufacturers report a shortage of qualified applicants for skilled production positions, and the shortage could cost U.S. manufacturers 11% of their annual earnings. Manufacturing executives reported an average of 94 days to recruit engineering and research employees and 70 days to recruit skilled production workers. The skills gap is driving up what are already above average wages and benefits in U.S. manufacturing. Studies show an increasing skills gap with as many as two million jobs going unfilled in the manufacturing industry alone in the next decade.

The Association for Advancing Automation (http://www.a3automate.org) (A3) explores the impact of automation on the ever-evolving job market and the growing shortage of skilled employees with experience and training in advanced technologies. A3 examines the types of jobs that are going unfilled and reviews workforce development initiatives, including education, apprenticeships, and on-the-job training that will fill labor shortages and support ongoing economic growth and productivity. http://www.a3automate.org/work-in-the-automation-age-white-paper/

Working in the Automation Age

Makin' the MAKERSPACE

There is tremendous buzz lately about setting up a makerspace. Thankfully, educators, policy makers (for some reason they are not always one and the same?) administrators and the education community in general are realizing that in order to really cultivate metacognition and real-world skills, we need hands-on, project-based learning. Object-based learning is making a comeback, and teachers are connecting lessons back to the industry, creating a more vocational education. A big part of this movement towards active learning and STEM is creating a makerspace in the classroom.

Gittel Grant

States Want More Career and Technical Training, but Struggle to Find Teachers

Many Minnesota employers say they can’t find skilled workers with the right career training. Meanwhile, high schools are cutting career and technical education courses because they can’t find qualified teachers. “The jobs are there, and we’re not preparing our kids well enough to get into those jobs because the system has not allowed us to,” said Stephen Jones, the superintendent of schools in Little Falls, Minnesota. His district hasn’t had to cancel any courses for lack of instructors, but he says smaller districts in the state have.

Two-thirds of states are currently reporting a shortage of CTE teachers in at least one specialty, according to a Stateline analysis of federal data. Many states, such as Minnesota and South Dakota, have had a shortage of CTE teachers for a decade. Some states, such as Maine, Maryland and New York, have had a shortage for almost 20 years.

A Letter From Students: "Make STEM Education Count"

As juniors in high school, we are concerned about our future. Since we have started high school, we have taken on challenging classes in an effort to prepare ourselves for higher education. We all started taking high school level classes in middle school in preparation to take college classes that we are currently enrolled in as high school students.

Our high school requires more STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) courses to graduate than what Idaho currently requires for graduation. We have spent hours preparing for and taking standardized tests including ISATs, civics exam, biology EOC (End of Course) assessment, and college entrance exams. In addition to all of our academic endeavors, we have all participated in community service activities and extracurriculars. Our class dreams big, and we are not afraid to put forth the extra effort to achieve those dreams.


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Competitions

MTConnect Student Challenge Sponsored by Association for Manufacturing Technology and Office of the Secretary of Defense

College students with an interest in bringing together software and hardware solutions to improve manufacturing operations now have an opportunity to leverage their creativity and innovative know-how through the MTConnect Student Challenge, a competition that invites submissions for both ideas and applications utilizing the MTConnect standard. The MTConnect Student Challenge is offering a total of $33,000 in cash prizes for winning submissions. MTConnect is an open-source, XML-based communications standard that fosters connectivity between manufacturing equipment and devices. This Challenge builds on the success of previous competitions that sought submissions from industry professionals related to the use of MTConnect. The MTConnect Student Challenge is open to community college and university students at the undergraduate and graduate level and may be of particular interest to students who are studying manufacturing-related fields; electrical, mechanical or industrial engineering; as well as software engineering and IT-related studies. http://www.challenge.gov/challenge/mtconnectstudentideas/


Series and Parallel Circuits

Grade Level: 
Middle School
Subject: 
Science
Provided by TryEngineering -
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Series and Parallel Circuits activity encourages students to test two different circuit designs through the use of low voltage light bulbs. Students work in teams to predict the difference between the two circuit designs, and then build examples of the two different circuits using wires, bulbs, and batteries. After testing several predictions about each circuit type, the groups will compare results and discuss findings.
 
Lesson Focus
Demonstrate and discuss simple circuits and the differences between parallel and serial circuit design and functions. Note: This lesson plan is designed for classroom use only, with supervision by a teacher familiar with electrical and electronic concepts.
 
Objectives 
- Learn that different circuit designs result in different electrical behaviors.
- Learn about current flow and the operational differences between series and parallel circuits.
- Learn to predict outcomes and draw conclusions.
- Learn about teamwork and working in groups.
 

Foundations

The Gene Haas Foundation

The Gene Haas Foundation made a gift of $1 million for scholarships in advanced manufacturing, as well as machining training and education to benefit as many as 1,000 students. The presentation ceremony took place next to the Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) on the Glendale Community College campus. Gene Haas presented a check to Kathy Burnham of the SME Education Foundation, which will administer the scholarship fund.


Employment