Home

Thomas Shaw's picture

Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


NEW EDITION OF WELDING SKILLS ADDRESSES INDUSTRY CERTIFICATION

American Technical Publishers announces the availability of new welding training materials specifically designed for welders and students working with all types of welding processes and systems. Welding Skills, Fourth Edition, is an effective instructional tool that addresses all aspects of the welding trade and the latest welding technology. In addition, competencies recommended in the American Welding Society (AWS) Schools Excelling through National Skills Standards Education (SENSE) guidelines are included throughout the textbook.


Technology in Action

Technology Phobia

All of us suffer from some sort of phobia, be it high places, closed areas, water, etc., and for most of these there is a cure. The phobia affecting many people over the past 40 to 50 years is Technology Phobia, or the uncertainty of how technology would affect their lives and their work.
Let us be honest with ourselves; all of us suffer from technology phobia to some degree or another.

Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


Click Your State For Local Information

Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

$500 Million in Community College Grants for Training Programs. Click (READ MORE) for State allocations.

$500 million in grants to community colleges and universities around the country for the development and expansion of innovative training programs. The grants are part of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training initiative, which promotes skills development and employment opportunities in fields such as advanced manufacturing, transportation and health care, as well as science, technology, engineering and math careers through partnerships between training providers and local employers. The U.S. Department of Labor is implementing and administering the program in coordination with the U.S. Department of Education.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

President Trump Establishes Workforce Council and Signs Career and Technical Education Bill Into Law

President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order (E.O. 13845) establishing the President’s National Council for the American Worker. The council – co-chaired by the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Labor, the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, and the Advisor to the President overseeing the Office of Economic Initiatives – will develop recommendations for a national strategy that fosters coordination, cooperation, consistency, and information exchange among federal and local government entities, private industry, and non-profit organizations to empower American workers. Ten other federal officials will comprise the council including the Directors of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Within 180 days of the executive order, the council must develop a national campaign and recommendations to create and promote workforce development strategies that provide education and skills-based training. The intent is to prepare youth and adults for the jobs of today and of the future.


Syndicate content

The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

Accelerate STEM Innovation with FREE Ed Tech Tools

It is generally accepted that one can not design education today to prepare young people and adults for the future because we do not know what the future will be. Today, technology has zoomed past schools, industry, government, consumers and civil society. The modern world needs a new way, or more accurately, an old way of seeing technology. 

The question is not whether we can design for the future; rather, the question is: Can we update antiquated practice more closely aligned to what is emerging today in our own backyards?

 

News

Brigadier General Ben Robinson Praises Teachers

Teachers Give Kids the Chance to Improve Their Lives, Teach Kids to Understand American Society and Train them to be Valuable Workers.

When you think about that, it’s about having quality of life, having the opportunity to understand what a great country this is and how you participate in it. And finally, to be able to do a good job for someone who is paying you.

General Robinson say’s today’s students need four important skill sets:

·         Knowledge-based skills drawn from their formal education

·         Technical Skills

·         Soft Skills (employability skills)

·         Opportunity Skills (knowledge of personal finance and appreciation of arts and culture)

 Students are willing to take challenging classes if they are properly motivated, but motivation requires relevance. And so-called relevant classes must include paths to possible careers.

Remember, you educate for quality of life, quality of opportunity and workforce. So why not have industry members come and speak to you about careers? Because what it does is it creates relevance, and relevance creates opportunity or the opportunity for rigor. And rigor gives you the opportunity to have advanced degrees and build a great America.


Time to Reinforce the Building Blocks of The American Dream

Successful nations, just like successful businesses, are built on three things: people, education and ideas. 

By opening our nation’s doors to people ready to build new lives and abide by the Constitution, the U.S. has become a stronger, more vibrant nation. By investing heavily in public education, the nation transformed both natives and newcomers into literate, numerate Americans ready to contribute to an advanced industrial economy. And by investing in scientific research, the nation combined and advanced new ideas — many from these new Americans — in new ways to build the most productive, prosperous nation the world has even seen.

However, these three pillars of the American dream — people, education and the investment in scientific research that is the wellspring of new ideas, new capabilities and new products — are all endangered.


A New U: Faster + Cheaper Alternatives to College

Every year, the cost of a four-year degree goes up, and the value goes down. But for many students, there’s a better answer. 

So many things are getting faster and cheaper. Movies stream into your living room, without ticket or concession-stand costs. The world’s libraries are at your fingertips instantly, and for free. 

So why is a college education the only thing that seems immune to change? Colleges and universities operate much as they did 40 years ago, with one major exception: they’ve gotten dramatically more expensive. And they’ve actually gotten slower, with the average time to graduate now over five years. 

As a result, graduates often struggle with enormous debt burdens. Even worse, they often find that degrees did not prepare them to obtain and succeed at good jobs in growing sectors of the economy. Parents and students have accepted this because a college degree has been seen as a prerequisite to a professional career. But now, for the first time, there are real alternatives. 

A New You

ONE and DONE, Workforce Development at Houston Community College

Houston Community College is pioneering a program to ensure students earn a level one certificate, receive resume writing assistance and get help with job interviews in just one semester.  The “Take One & Done” program is being offered at HCC’s Southeast College Eastside Campus.

“Students come full time and we will provide financial aid, child care from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. if necessary, and they will get a level one certificate in one of seven programs,” says Melissa Gonzalez, president of Southeast College. “We looked specifically at these programs, where there are jobs and there is a demand for workers.”

“Take One and Done” includes level one certificates in:

  1. Welding Technology-Basic Welding Helper
  2. Construction Management Technology
  3. Industrial Electricity Electrical Helper
  4. Business Management-Insurance Specialist/Associate
  5. Logistics & Supply Chain Management - Maritime Logistics & Specialist
  6. Real Estate - Residential
  7. HVAC

Silicon Valley Companies Encouraging Local Student to Aspire for High-Tech Jobs

Internships, contests and engineering coursework give teens from the area’s majority-Latino high schools an entree to STEM careers. 

Most students at the high school, on San Jose’s East Side in the southern end of Silicon Valley, are from Mexican immigrant families. Nearly all will be the first in their families to go to college; some will be the first to complete high school. The kids who grow up in Silicon Valley’s Latino neighborhoods, the children of groundskeepers, janitors, cooks and construction workers, rarely get a shot at high-paying, high-tech jobs. Just 4.7 percent of the Valley’s tech professionals are Latino and 2.2 percent are African-American, according to 2015 data from the American Community Survey. By contrast, 57 percent are foreign-born, with many coming from India and China, a local industry group estimates.

Silicon Valley STEM

FIRST Championship About Way More Than Robotics

It’s about the lessons it teaches its students, the empowerment it creates for its teachers, and the love of learning it fosters among all involved. FIRST Championship is the shining example of everything FIRST values: teamwork within and between teams; learning and on-the-fly problem-solving; “Coopertition®,” which is what we like to call displays of unqualified kindness and respect in the face of fierce competition; and “Gracious Professionalism®,” which encourages high-quality work, emphasizes the value of others, and shows respect for everyone.

FIRST Championship is an incredible experience with many lessons, but there are three that can be applied to every classroom.

1. It’s not about winning—it’s about the journey

Competition is about so much more than who comes out on top. True winning means we’ve inspired a real love of learning in our students, teaching them to solve problems, work collaboratively, and communicate with others. Most important, it teaches them humility and resilience in the face of failure, and the innovation and creativity they need to overcome these obstacles. Our students frequently tell us they leave our program as very different people than when they joined. They transform from timid to confident leaders, from hesitant to adept engineers, and it’s a pleasure for us to watch them grow.


Syndicate content

Competitions

All American Soap Box Derby

Gravity Racing Challenge

With Soap Box Derby cars being used in over 300 schools in 13 states and in classrooms in Singapore, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, and Japan, the International Soap Box Derby continues its mission to develop and provide educational opportunities for K-12 youth worldwide.

Promoting the S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering, and math) initiative in education through gravity racing, the Gravity Racing Challenge (GRC) program is designed to provide K-12 educators and students  with  meaningful, project and standards based, intercurricular  learning opportunities. Educators are successfully implementing the GRC program in classrooms,  after-school, summer or enrichment programs and clubs worldwide.


Aerospace Engineering

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering, Aerospace
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on aerospace engineering and how space flight has been achieved from an engineering vantage point. Students build and launch a model rocket and consider the forces on a rocket, Newton's Laws, and other principles and challenges of actual space vehicle launch. They design their structure on paper, learn about aerospace engineering, launch their rocket, and share observations with their class.
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The "Blast Off" lesson explores rocketry, and the principals of space flight. Students work in teams with teacher supervision and construct and launch a rocket from an inexpensive kit. They observe their own achievements and challenges, as well as those of other student teams, complete a reflection sheet, and present their experiences to the class.  
 
 
Time Needed
Two to four 45-minute sessions.
 
Objectives 
 
ª  Learn about aerospace engineering.
ª  Learn about engineering design and redesign.
ª  Learn about space flight.
ª  Learn how engineering can help solve society's challenges.
ª  Learn about teamwork and problem solving.
 

Foundations

Tuition-Free Community College, The America's College Promise

Forty percent of college students are enrolled at one of America’s more than 1,100 community colleges, which offer students affordable tuition, open admission policies, and convenient locations.  They are particularly important for students who are older, working, need remedial classes, or can only take classes part-time. For many students, they offer academic programs and an affordable route to a four-year college degree. They are also uniquely positioned to partner with employers to create tailored training programs to meet economic needs within their communities such as nursing, health information technology, and advanced manufacturing.

The America’s College Promise proposal would create a new partnership with states to help them waive tuition in high-quality programs for responsible students, while promoting key reforms to help more students complete at least two years of college. Restructuring the community college experience, coupled with free tuition, can lead to gains in student enrollment, persistence, and completion transfer, and employment. Specifically, here is what the initiative will mean:

Employment