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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


How 3D Printing in Education Improves Learning

With the advent of affordable 3d printers like the DaVinci 1.0 (costs less than $500 in the USA), we wanted to see how this technology can best benefit education. Studica is always looking for ways to help education customers marry new technologies with their teaching goals, to help create a stronger learning experience for students.


Technology in Action

Technology Phobia

All of us suffer from some sort of phobia, be it high places, closed areas, water, etc., and for most of these there is a cure. The phobia affecting many people over the past 40 to 50 years is Technology Phobia, or the uncertainty of how technology would affect their lives and their work.
Let us be honest with ourselves; all of us suffer from technology phobia to some degree or another.

A Brighter Tomorrow

How often we wish for another chance

To make a fresh beginning,

A chance to blot our mistakes

And change failure into winning--

And it does not take a new year

To make a brand-new start,

It only takes the deep desire

To try with all our heart

To live a little better

And to always be forgiving

And to add a little laughter

To the world in which we're living--

So never give up in despair

And think that you are through,

For there's always a tomorrow

And a chance to start anew.

Anonymous


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

National Education Foundation Launches STEM Grant Program

In order to improve the critical STEM education in the nation’s K-12 schools, National Education Foundation (NEF), the national non-profit leader in bridging the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) divides, has launched a multimillion dollar grant program in partnership with TEKSystems and Pearson.

Any school district/school with 35% or more students on Free/Reduced cost lunch is eligible. Apply at http://www.cyberlearning.org/adoptgrant. NEF will award 100 grants in 2013-14 school year, with at least one in each state.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

$200 Million from DOE Backed Up By $300 Million from Corporations Supporting STEM Education

Many of the country’s largest tech companies, including Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Salesforce, pledged a total of $300 million for computer science education, part of a partnership meant to prepare students for careers in technology. The corporate donations follow a White House effort to direct federal money toward teacher training and resources that bolster science, technology, engineering and math. President Trump directed the Education Department to put $200 million in grant money toward computer science education.

Many of the companies involved in the computer science initiative have been pushing to increase computer training in schools. Tech companies see the STEM fields, and computer science in particular, as a weakness in American education and have pressed for coding and other classes to be bolstered to keep the United States competitive with nations that are pulling ahead in those areas.


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

The Art of the Future

These are stories of high school students and teachers (and public and private partners acting through networks) to do “real world” scientific research and development (R&D) and engineering design. This is the new face of advanced technological education in America’s high schools and community colleges. Job profiles are provided by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education initiative.


News

Manufacturing Day 2017 at Over 2617 locations around the U.S.

Manufacturing Day is a growing grassroots movement of manufacturers dedicated to overcoming the shared challenges facing manufacturers today. The most pressing issue is a gap in skilled labor. 80 percent of manufacturers cannot find the skilled workers they need. This gap continues to widen. Manufacturers’ ability to address this issue has been hindered by the public perception that careers in manufacturing are undesirable and by the lack of sufficient preparatory education. Both of these problems stem from a lack of understanding of present-day manufacturing environments, which are highly technical. Manufacturing environments, which include highly trained, well-paid employees who work on state-of-the-art equipment, are commonly thought of as antiquated factories designed for low-skilled workers. Manufacturing Day addresses this misperception by giving all manufacturers an opportunity to open their doors and show, in a coordinated effort, exactly what manufacturing is.


Skills USA Members Joined by the Secretary of Education in Support of Career and Technical Education

Students representing career and technical education (CTE) programs in 29 states met with congressional representatives Sept. 26 after hearing the Secretary of Education call SkillsUSA “an integral part of their educational experience.” The students were attending the annual Washington Leadership Training Institute (WLTI) to learn to be better advocates for public career education. During the Sept. 23-27 event, they visited their congressional representatives and paid respects at Arlington National Cemetery’s Tomb of the Unknowns as well as the Pentagon 9/11 Memorial. The annual WLTI, with 506 attendees, was the largest in SkillsUSA’s 52-year history.

Skills USA

50,361 Workforce Credentials Issued in Virginia in Fiscal Year 2017

Virginia has achieved the goal set in Executive Order 23 – Establishing the New Virginia Economy Workforce Initiative, which called for the annual production of 50,000 workforce credentials aligned with high-paying jobs in science, technology, engineering, math, and healthcare (STEM-H). The 50,361 STEM-H credentials awarded during fiscal year 2017 represent a 36-percent increase compared to fiscal year 2014 when the goal of 50,000 credentials per year was set. These credentials include: associate degrees, certificate programs, apprenticeships, certifications, licenses, and industry credentials.                   

 

“Because we set an ambitious goal of 50,000 STEM-H credentials each year, Virginia is transforming its workforce into one that is both highly skilled and work-ready for businesses across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Terry McAuliffe.  “These workforce credentials are critical to supporting Virginia’s growing high-tech economy by providing citizens the skills they need to get good-paying jobs. The success of this effort is a testament to the hard work of our educators, students, and business leaders who are strengthening our new Virginia economy every day.”


Robot Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

unveils a framework for universities to train the next generation of creators, rather than laborers, by enhancing skills that are innately, and uniquely, human. The impetus for the book was a realization that robotics and artificial intelligence are advancing more rapidly than anyone predicted. Even scientists appear to be caught off-guard by the sudden and unprecedented capabilities of their creations. These technological advances have vast implications, especially for the future of work.

Northeastern University President and author Joseph E. Aoun said, “Machines are smart and getting smarter,” More jobs are going to disappear and new jobs will be created. We need to meet these challenges.”

http://robot-proof.com/

His plan? Cultivate the best of what it means to be human. Aoun has proposed a new comprehensive curriculum based on a field he calls humanics—the human equivalent of robotics—which is defined by the mastery of three literacies: technological literacy, data literacy, and human literacy—the third referring to qualities computers can’t replicate, no matter how smart they become.

Northeastern University President and author Joseph E. Aoun

Massachusetts CTE Approach Works - Widely Popular With Students

In Massachusetts 48,000 students are enrolled in vocational schools and vocational programs in traditional high schools, with an estimated 3,200 more on waiting lists due to a shortage of available space for those who qualify for acceptance. At Blue Hills Regional Technical School in Canton, which has approximately 850 students in grades 9 through 12, there were 511 applications for just 240 places in the Class of 2021.

What is driving the popularity of vocational education – career and technical education (CTE) – in Massachusetts? How does today’s vocational education differ from that of yesteryear? What is happening in the Bay State on the CTE frontline that is making it so successful and sought after?


IBM Expands New Collar Career Partnerships with U.S. Community Colleges

America’s largest technology employer is expanding partnerships with numerous community colleges in the United States to better prepare more Americans for “New Collar” career opportunities. In these well-paying roles, in-demand technology skills are valued more than credentials, and a traditional four-year college degree may not always be required. In addition to collaborating on curricula design for next generation IT skills, IBM will work with community colleges near its major U.S. facilities to offer more local students the opportunity to participate in internships and apprenticeships within the company, as well as direct hiring for IBM careers. This initiative will grow over the next six months to include more than a dozen schools in or near communities such as Columbia, MO; Rocket Center, WV; Dubuque, IA; Boulder, CO; Poughkeepsie, NY; Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX and Houston, TX. With this initiative, IBM is working to expand technology career opportunities in areas that traditionally have been underserved by high-tech employers.

 


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Competitions

MTConnect Student Challenge Sponsored by Association for Manufacturing Technology and Office of the Secretary of Defense

College students with an interest in bringing together software and hardware solutions to improve manufacturing operations now have an opportunity to leverage their creativity and innovative know-how through the MTConnect Student Challenge, a competition that invites submissions for both ideas and applications utilizing the MTConnect standard. The MTConnect Student Challenge is offering a total of $33,000 in cash prizes for winning submissions. MTConnect is an open-source, XML-based communications standard that fosters connectivity between manufacturing equipment and devices. This Challenge builds on the success of previous competitions that sought submissions from industry professionals related to the use of MTConnect. The MTConnect Student Challenge is open to community college and university students at the undergraduate and graduate level and may be of particular interest to students who are studying manufacturing-related fields; electrical, mechanical or industrial engineering; as well as software engineering and IT-related studies. http://www.challenge.gov/challenge/mtconnectstudentideas/


A Century of Plastics

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Materials. Pre-Engineering
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on how plastics of all sorts have been engineered in to everyday products over the past century, with emphasis on materials selection and engineering.
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Century of Plastics activity explores how the development of plastics -- and the engineering of plastic components into everyday products -- has impacted the world. Students learn about the history of plastics, what plastics engineers do, and how many products have been enhanced through the addition of plastic components. Students work in teams to identify products without plastic, and products they think could not exist in a
pre-plastic world. They work as teams of "engineers" to see if they can redesign a product to use 50% less plastic components than in current designs.  
 

Foundations

Boeing Engineers Create STEM Activities to Challenge and Inspire Students

Boeing, Iridescent's Curiosity Machine, PBS Learning Media and the Teaching Channel have produced a collection of educational materials and tutorials that children can use to engineer an airfoil, find alternative energy sources and design their own satellite, among dozens of other activities.

The activities are intended to develop skills such as the ability to think critically, collaborate and communicate effectively. Boeing engineers worked side-by-side with its partners to develop lesson plans, documentaries and hands-on activities that break down complicated concepts into easy-to-digest resources. All materials and tutorials are available to download for free at Boeing's Educational Resources page. http://www.boeing.com/principles/education.page#/edu_resources

Employment