CA

  • user warning: Table './apluss5_teched/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and last (automatic?) repair failed query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_filter WHERE cid = '3:a3acd6cea017ca57ee74cd61cd915bcf' in /home/apluss5/public_html/techedmagazine.com/includes/cache.inc on line 27.
  • user warning: Table './apluss5_teched/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and last (automatic?) repair failed query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment-->\n</p><p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UCR professors honored with STEM award<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">At their third-annual summit, the California STEM Learning network honored two female UCR professors and 10 other women with the &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo; statewide award.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Held on Oct. 15 and 16, the two-day conference on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) took place in San Diego, with the attendance of over 350 researchers, educators, policymakers and entrepreneurs. The summit focused on creating new partnerships that would bring more innovative ways in terms of how STEM education is taught, learned and applied.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;The synergy of participants and their total commitment to STEM was amazing,&rdquo; said Dr. Pamela Clute, UC Riverside&rsquo;s assistant vice chancellor of educational and community engagement, executive director of the ALPHA Center and lecturer in math. In an interview with the Highlander, she said the summit gave useful insight on the innovative ways in which teachers could educate students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Dr. Clute was one of the speakers at the summit as well as a recipient of the &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo; award. The award is presented to those who have shown leadership in advancing critical areas of STEM education, including adoption of NEXT Generation Science Standards and advocating for strengthened public-private partnerships and alignment of resources.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;That validation of our work makes us want to do more&hellip; Teachers do change futures and they do change lives because they provide the inspiration that young people need,&rdquo; Dr. Clute said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Susan Hackwood, the executive director of the California Council on Science and Technology and professor at UC Riverside also received the award. Dr. Hackwood is the founding dean of UCR&rsquo;s Bourns College of Engineering and she has overseen the development of all research and teaching aspects of five degree programs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">California is currently ranked 43rd in the nation in undergraduate math and science proficiency. According to the Department of Labor, the fastest growing and best paying occupations are in medicine, engineering, computer science, energy/environment and data communication. Out of these jobs, 63 percent require STEM knowledge and 92 percent require post secondary education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Right now, STEM education is absolutely necessary for a vibrant economy and we need to educate the next generation in these fields,&rdquo; said Dr. Clute.
Her presentation at the summit, &ldquo;Why STEM, Why Partnership,&rdquo; was centered on the grounds of building a partnership between education, businesses, government, media, and faith-based groups to work towards improving STEM education. &ldquo;This is about community and working towards the same goal,&rdquo; she said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chris Roe, the CEO of California STEM Learning Network, said in a recent Press-Enterprise article that adjustments coming to the state&rsquo;s educational curriculum will bring changes in the way STEM education has been taught by both new and veteran teachers.
Other speakers at the summit included State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, ambassador for California&rsquo;s STEM school program and basketball champion Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and scientists from NASA, Google and Pixar.</span><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.highlandernews.org/4971/ucr-professors-honored-with-stem-award/\">http://www.highlandernews.org/4971/ucr-professors-honored-with-stem-award/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Los Gatos High School\'s hands-on science class a boost to STEM efforts <o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Cathy Messenger has long understood that the best way to teach kids science is to show them what the discipline\'s complicated formulas and physics are good for.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">So when the Los Gatos High School chemistry teacher heard there was private grant money available to launch the sort of advanced research class that she\'d been thinking about for years, she jumped at it. Now she presides over a classroom of 21 students working on everything from sending water samples to space to reversing benzene contamination of soil with phanerochaete chrysosporium.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Yes, phanerochaete chrysosporium.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;You learn the content and it means something,&quot; Messenger says of her class where students were recently typing on laptops, mixing solutions and discussing findings with each other. &quot;It\'s about the experience. When do you retain information the most? When you\'ve learned something that you have to immediately put to use.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">I first heard from Messenger about her Advanced Science Research class last summer. I had just written about the <a href=\"http://www.siliconvalley.com/topics?Google%20Inc.\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Google</span></a> (<a href=\"http://markets.financialcontent.com/mng-ba.siliconvalley/quote?Symbol=GOOG\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">GOOG</span></a>) Science Fair and said that I intended to write more columns about ideas that can help spark students\' interest in science, technology, engineering and math. It turns out that Sabera Talukder, one of the Google finalists, had taken Messenger\'s class last year, the<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">first year she offered it.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Messenger told me that Talukder came up with a low-cost way to purify water in developing countries when Talukder\'s passion and curiosity intersected with the mentoring and resources provided in the advanced research class. And it all made so much sense to me. Silicon Valley employers and educators for years have been worrying about where the next generation of technologists is coming from. Students -- especially girls -- seem to fall away from math, science and technical fields in middle school and high school. By college, the brightest are headed for business, finance, Wall Street and the big bucks.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">But maybe a high school course in which kids think for themselves, push themselves and confront real-world problems, is the sort of thing that can flip a switch.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;I feel just so lucky to have this class,&quot; says Talukder, 16, who\'s back this year working on prototypes of her purification system, which she hopes to deploy in Bangladesh this winter. &quot;It\'s given me a sense of purpose: How can I affect and how can I change the world?&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">And as Talukder struggles with raising money to build her prototypes, it\'s given her a real-world lesson on how difficult it can be to bring about change.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Actually, I found out that the hardest thing about science is not the research,&quot; she says. &quot;It\'s implementing it.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The research class seems like a no-brainer, but in a world where standardize tests rule and school budgets are stretched to the breaking point, such elective classes are something of a luxury. The work Messenger\'s students are doing doesn\'t directly line up with test questions. And projects that involve growing plants on the ocean\'s surface, testing the toxicity of cadmium chloride and analyzing water\'s properties in microgravity cost money.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Messenger, a biochemist who worked for years in medical diagnostics research, is resourceful. She\'s recruited her husband, an electrical engineer, and another parent, who is a mechanical engineer, to help mentor students. The grant she landed provides funding for up to three more years, including $5,000 a year for supplies. (It also comes with the condition that the donor remain anonymous.) And Messenger has joined with Valley Christian Schools on a project to send a team experiment to the International Space Station in March.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">It\'s a shame that innovative programs like Messenger\'s are so random and so fragile. Teachers and schools need to get lucky; to find a grant here, a volunteer mentor there. And when the current grant expires, Messenger isn\'t quite sure how she will pay to continue the class.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;It\'s always been my passion,&quot; she says of the research-based class. &quot;It\'s part of why I became a teacher.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">And clearly the passion is contagious. In Messenger\'s class one recent afternoon, students talked about the practical implications of their research. Andrea Kibel, a junior, is exploring the idea of growing food on the oceans\' surface. She says she was inspired by similar projects launched on inland lakes.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;There is so much ocean surface available compared to fresh water,&quot; she says.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Sophomore Eugenia Huang has embraced the independent nature of the research class. A few weeks into the school year, she switched her focus from pyrolysis (heating biowaste to create fuel) to working on benzene with phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white fungus. The fuel idea, she explains, would have required purchasing a $12,000 furnace or building one that would burn at 800 degrees.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;We were just afraid that it would blow up,&quot; she says.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">But the discovery by doing, or even discovering what you can\'t yet do, is part of the joy of science -- a joy that seems to be warmly embraced by the researchers in Cathy Messenger\'s classroom.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.marinij.com/ci_21957501/cassidy-los-gatos-high-school-cathy-messenger-stem-science-class\">http://www.marinij.com/ci_21957501/cassidy-los-gatos-high-school-cathy-messenger-stem-science-class</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">CSUDH program turns out more math and science teachers than any other CSU campus<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Cal Poly is renowned within the California State University system for its applied-science programs. Humboldt State is known for its forestry. Perhaps it\'s time that California State University, Dominguez Hills, in Carson gains a reputation as the CSU system\'s leading producer of math and science teachers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Half a decade ago, in response to lagging student achievement in math and science, then CSU Chancellor Charles Reed challenged all 22 campuses to double their output of teachers in those subjects.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As a whole, the system met its five-year goal. But no campus had more success than Dominguez Hills.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In the five years after Reed made his pledge in 2006-07, Dominguez Hills - one of the smaller campuses in the CSU network - churned out 620 math and science teachers, according to data from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. That\'s the highest number of all the schools.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Carson campus has a close runner-up in the much larger California State University, Long Beach, which produced 601 such teachers in the five years ending in 2010-11, the latest available data. But after that the competition isn\'t even close: Northridge, the next runner-up, produced 479. The output of the other campuses ranged from 79 to 478.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Allow me to brag,&quot; said Kamal Hamdan, an education professor and the project director for Cal State Dominguez Hills\' Math and Science Teacher Initiatives. &quot;This is really a source of pride for us, as we are a small campus.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The impressive numbers at Dominguez Hills stem largely from Hamdan\'s program, which sweetens the deal for those interested in becoming K-12 math and science teachers. Many of the incentives come from several pots of state and federal money, countering the unfortunate trends of skyrocketing tuition and student debt.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Perks include waiving the college debt for any newly minted teacher who dedicates four years to an inner-city school; a $10,000-a-year salary bonus<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">program for such teachers who stick around for longer than four years at a high-need school and agree to mentor other teachers; stipends for new classroom teachers to purchase calculators, pencils and other supplies; and a fast-track program allowing holders of bachelor degrees to become full-on classroom teachers in a matter of months.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Not just anyone can qualify; students must meet at least one of several criteria. One is to be a midcareer professional with substantial experience in math and science - perhaps an engineer at the Boeing Co. or Lockheed Corp. who is looking for a change. A qualified applicant could also be a college graduate with a math or science degree. Or someone with experience as a teachers aide or paraprofessional.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">All applicants must finish with a decent GPA, demonstrate proficiency on exams and, perhaps most importantly, agree to teach in a disadvantaged urban setting.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Another recommended qualification is a love of teaching. Many midcareer professionals who graduate from the program - known as Transition to Teaching - take a hefty pay cut.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Such was the case for Daisy Lee, a math teacher and teacher coach at Banning High in Wilmington who, as one of the program\'s first graduates in 2001, discovered that the roughly $60,000 she earned as a litigation secretary had been knocked down to about $34,000.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;That was a bigger shock than the kids,&quot; she said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Not that going from the office environment to a room filled with teenagers was seamless. Lee wasn\'t quite prepared for the physicality of the job, for instance.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;I always tease Dr. Hamdan (by telling him), `You should have told us to buy a good pair of shoes,&quot;\' she said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">She also remembers students tossing litter on the floor of the classroom, ignoring the nearby trash cans.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;It was a shock, but I had no problem asking them to pick it up,&quot; she said. &quot;Once I did, they did. They just needed someone to point it out to them.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Lee, 44, quickly acclimated to the job. Wherever she goes, math scores tend to improve. This has happened at both Narbonne and Gardena high schools, whose scores both went from dismal to much better during her stay. Now she\'s hoping for similar results at Banning.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;I want kids to understand math is fun,&quot; she said. &quot;You just need teachers who are fun.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A more recent product of the Dominguez Hills program is 23-year-old Sarah Kwon.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Like many college students, Kwon, a San Pedro native, racked up $25,000 in student debt at the University of California at Berkeley, where she\'d earned a science degree. Because she made a commitment through the Dominguez Hills program to stay at Wilmington Middle School for at least four years, all but $2,000 of those loans will be forgiven.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Naturally, that was a huge enticement. So was the speed of the program: Within three months of enrolling, she was in the classroom, earning a paycheck. (Kwon spent a year teaching by day and taking classes toward her credential by night.)<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The program also gave her a $150 gift card to purchase materials for her middle school classroom, such as calculators, pencils and flash drives.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;One of the best things about TTT (Transition to Teaching) is they are so well-funded,&quot; she said. &quot;There\'s just so much money that they throw at us. ... It\'s almost ridiculous.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The program seems to have achieved its objective with respect to Kwon, a lifelong science buff who has no intention of leaving the profession after her four years are up.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;I think I will stick around,&quot; she said. &quot;I like it.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.dailybreeze.com/education/ci_21976989/csudh-program-turns-out-more-math-and-science\">http://www.dailybreeze.com/education/ci_21976989/csudh-program-turns-out-more-math-and-science</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Colfax High School Students Receive MIT Invention Grant<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Jonathan Schwartz, Colfax math and engineering teacher is mentoring the team.&nbsp; &quot;This opportunity builds on the Career Technical Education program we\'ve expanded at Colfax High School with the support of the Sierra College Science, Technology, Engineering &amp; Math (STEM) Collaborative,&quot; said Schwartz. We focus on product development to attract students to STEM careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">InvenTeams of high school students, teachers and mentors receive grants to invent technological solutions to real-world problems and to inspire a new generation of inventors.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;The InvenTeams program represents the future,&quot; said Leigh Estabrooks, invention education officer from the Lemelson-MIT Program.&nbsp; &quot;We place an emphasis on STEM-focused projects to develop interest in these fields among youth.&nbsp; With InvenTeams, our primary goal is to foster high school students\' passion for invention, in turn inspiring them to consider careers in science, technology, engineering or math.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Colfax students will invent a Tri-Metric tool that can be used when building emergency housing. The goal is to make it easier to lay-out a house. It would allow novice builders to make sure the floor, walls and roof are all square, maximizing support to make the home sturdy.&nbsp; The students hope to design the mechanical device so it can be manufactured for under $20. The idea is to build in all the complex math of trigonometry into the tool so it can be used by anyone.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Not only will it help with construction and address a need in relief efforts,&quot; said Schwartz. &quot;More importantly, there will an educational component in this invention that teaches the math involved in constructing a house.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Carol Pepper-Kittredge, Director, Center for Applied Competitive Technologies (CACT), Sierra College will mentor the team. &quot;This project is an extension of the leadership Jonathan Schwartz and Colfax High School have demonstrated as participants in CACT\'s Sierra STEM Collaborative,&quot; said Pepper-Kittredge. &quot;By applying their design, fabrication and math skills to solve a global problem, students, especially young women, will be inspired to consider technical careers.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Entrepreneur and author Peter Sims, who wrote Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries and coauthored the best-seller True North: Discover Your Authentic Leadership with Bill George will also mentor the team. A Colfax High School graduate, Sims has already met with students and inspired them with tales of how industry leaders innovate and produce new products.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Schwartz, himself an inventor, says that students will experience working on a team and applying critical thinking skills. &quot;They will design, and repeatedly prototype, test, and rebuild the Tri-Metric construction tool over nine months. They will go through the same experience that inventors go through,&quot; said Schwartz. &quot;In June, the students will showcase a prototype of their invention at EurekaFest at MIT in Cambridge, MA.&quot; EurekaFest, presented by the Lemelson-MIT Program, is a multi-day celebration designed to empower a legacy of inventors through activities that inspire youth, honor role models and encourage creativity and problem solving.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">For more information, contact Jonathan Schwartz, Colfax High School at 530-346-2284 x 2408 or <a href=\"mailto:jschwart@puhsd.k12.ca.us\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">jschwart@puhsd.k12.ca.us</span></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">ABOUT THE LEMELSON-MIT PROGRAM</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">
Celebrating innovation, inspiring youth
The Lemelson-MIT Program celebrates outstanding innovators and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention. Jerome H. Lemelson, one of U.S. history\'s most prolific inventors, and his wife Dorothy founded the Lemelson-MIT Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994. It is funded by The Lemelson Foundation and administered by the School of Engineering. The Foundation sparks, sustains and celebrates innovation and the inventive spirit. It supports projects in the U.S. and developing countries that nurture innovators and unleash invention to advance economic, social and environmentally sustainable development. To date The Lemelson Foundation has donated or committed more than U.S. $150 million in support of its mission. <a href=\"http://web.mit.edu/invent/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">http://web.mit.edu/invent/</span></a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.rocklintoday.com/news/templates/community_news.asp?articleid=11095&amp;zoneid=4\">http://www.rocklintoday.com/news/templates/community_news.asp?articleid=11095&amp;zoneid=4</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">LAUSD unveils state-of-the-art science center named for astronaut Sally Ride <o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">L.A. Unified unveiled a state-of-the-art science facility in Glassell Park Monday that bears the name of the late astronaut Sally Ride, in hopes of inspiring a new generation of students to pursue careers in math and science.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Sally Ride Center for Environmental Science is a&nbsp;$4.8 million LEED-certified facility that sits behind the Sonia M. Sotomayor Learning Academies. The&nbsp;6,000 square foot&nbsp;facility, less than a mile from the L.A. River, includes three state-of-the-art labs that will focus on areas such as hydrology and energy. The labs have high-tech, professional grade equipment, including a photovoltaic demonstration system, a PH water lab, a centrifuge, and field spectrometers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The site will be used not only as a hands-on science lab for students who will conduct water and soil testing and energy conservation research, but also to train teachers.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Sally Ride\'s mother and sister were at Monday\'s ceremony.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;This is the sort of thing that Sally would have been absolutely delighted about,&quot; said her sister, Bear Ride. Sally Ride was an L.A. Unified alum who attended Encino Elementary School and Portola Junior High School.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Bear Ride said her&nbsp;sister had been deeply influenced by her math and science teachers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;In fact, all the astronauts I know tell stories about their teachers pushing in the old black and white TV sets to watch John Glenn being launched into space, and it was those teachers who really caught the imagination of kids,&quot; Ride said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">They &quot;learned, if you\'re curious about how stuff works or why things happen, science is the way to go. There are different ways to get at that, but I think curiosity is the way to do it, hands on stuff. And this is what this center\'s all about,&quot; said Ride.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The facility was built and equipped primarily&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/gi/prop1d07summary.asp\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">by a state grant</span></a>&nbsp;to support career technical education, said L.A. Unified Board member Bennett Kayser. The facility will likely not open to all students until next fall, as the district needs more time to hire a director, sort out scheduling issues, and seek out partners for long-term funding.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In the meantime, the center is being used to train teachers, and for some experiments with students from the L.A. River School, a new pilot school.&nbsp;Kayser said students will be doing research that complements work done by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">L.A. Unified has two other similar outdoor classroom programs, including Clear Creek near Mt. Wilson, which is located near the headwaters of the L.A. River, and Point Fermin in the San Pedro area, located at the mouth of the river, Kayser said.&nbsp;&quot;Here we are, right in the center of those two sites. We should be able to do some very interesting research.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Sally Ride was the first American woman to fly in space and youngest U.S. astronaut in 1983. The then-32-year-old physicist and science writer was an inspiration to many women who considered pursuing careers in science and engineering. Ride, who died earlier this year, passionately championed efforts to involve young people, and especially girls, in the sciences.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">L.A. Unified officials hope the center will serve as a hub for students at many schools in the area. The district has about 100 campuses that are less than a mile from the L.A. River, Kayser said.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Christopher Bibelheimer, 14, and his mom Becky showed up at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. The Mt. Gleason Middle School eighth-grader, who has cerebral palsy, hopes he\'ll be able to make use of the facility. He says the center sounds &quot;cool&quot; because&nbsp;&quot;you\'re not in a book, having someone lecture at you...The fact that I get to go out and do something, that\'s what I like.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Democratic Assemblyman Gil Cedillo of Los Angeles urged dozens of students present at Monday\'s ceremony to embrace their inner nerd.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Science is cool. It\'s hip. It\'s what\'s happening,&quot; Cedillo said. &quot;Be a nerd. Own it. Be proud of it. There you go&quot; &mdash; he said to titters in the crowd &mdash; &quot;OK, if you\'re a nerd, raise your hand. If you like science and homework.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A few raised their hands.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;If you like your computer, you like your smart phone, if you like all those things.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">More hands went up.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Own it. I\'m proud of you. If you\'re a nerd, like it. Own it.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2012/10/29/10767/lausd-unveils-state-art-science-center-named-astro/\">http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2012/10/29/10767/lausd-unveils-state-art-science-center-named-astro/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Channel Islands Staffer Honored as a \'Leading Woman in STEM\'<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Sandy Birmingham, a STEM Pipeline and Outreach Coordinator for Project ACCESO at California State University Channel Islands (CI), has been named a &ldquo;Leading Woman in STEM&rdquo; for her work to advance science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Birmingham was one of 12 California women honored at the 2012 California STEM Summit held in San Diego Oct. 16. The award, presented by the nonprofit California STEM Learning Network (CSLNet), recognizes &ldquo;achievements in advancing innovative and effective STEM education initiatives across the state and serving as exemplary role models for California women and girls.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The organization honored Birmingham for her work creating high-quality, hands-on afterschool STEM programs. As Pipeline and Outreach Coordinator at CI&rsquo;s Project ACCESO, she works with area K-12 schools, community colleges, CI faculty and undergraduates, and employers on programs and partnerships to excite students about STEM learning and careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;It&rsquo;s not just an interest to me. It&rsquo;s a national priority,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;STEM yields innovation and the careers of the future.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Birmingham has been a history teacher, a Spanish teacher, and more recently served as a program director for Moving Beyond the Bell Afterschool Programs, where she was honored for helping structure innovative afterschool STEM programs in the Sierra Sands Unified School District, partnering with the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division and other local employers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The &ldquo;Leading Woman&rdquo; recognition took Birmingham by surprise. She shared the honor with 11 other prominent women from across the state, including a California Assemblywoman, a National Science Foundation grant-awarded physicist, the Chancellor of UC Davis, and Dr. Joan Bissell, Director of Teacher Education and Public School Programs for the CSU system.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I was so humbled to be standing alongside these accomplished women,&rdquo; Birmingham said. &ldquo;To share that honor with them was a huge highlight in my career.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">CSLNet created the &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo; awards to help highlight the dramatic need to increase the number of women in STEM fields and recognize women leaders who are making a difference. Currently, only 25 percent of STEM jobs in the U.S. are held by women.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">At CI, Birmingham works with Project ACCESO Director Professor Phil Hampton on multiple initiatives that stimulate interest in STEM learning and careers among students in kindergarten through college. In addition to developing afterschool programs, she coaches CI students on how to create and execute project-based lesson plans; oversees mentoring programs; helps organize the Science Carnival, school science nights and other community events; and reaches out to create new partnerships with regional schools and employers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Birmingham serves as a member of the California After School Network&rsquo;s Leadership Team, STEM Committee and Nominating Committee, and as an ambassador emeritus for the Afterschool Alliance. She graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles with a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Master of Arts in Education from Azusa Pacific University as well as a teaching credential.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In addition to receiving her award at the STEM Summit, Birmingham and a former colleague gave a presentation on systematic approaches to making STEM partnerships successful.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">She gave her award &ndash; an engraved glass statue &ndash; to her father.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;My dad raised me and worked three jobs so I could get an education and go to college,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Any time I have the opportunity, I want to honor him.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/29/ci-staffer-honored-as-a-leading-woman-in-stem-6178/\">http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/29/ci-staffer-honored-as-a-leading-woman-in-stem-6178/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC Davis chancellor a \'Woman of Stem\'<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi is among a dozen &quot;Leading Women in STEM&quot; recognized Tuesday at the 2012 California STEM Summit in San Diego.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The awards recognize honorees for their achievements in advancing innovative and effective STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education initiatives across the state, and for being exemplary role models for California women and girls.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Katehi is an electrical engineer by training, with 19 U.S. patents in her name. At UC Davis, she holds joint appointments in the departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Women and Gender Studies. She has been a member of numerous national boards and advisory committees on science, engineering and education, including serving as chair of the National Academy of Engineering\'s Committee on K-12 Engineering education from 2007 to 2009.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Since her early years as a faculty member, Katehi has focused on expanding research opportunities for undergraduates and improving the education and professional experience of graduate students, especially from underrepresented groups. She has mentored more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, doctoral and master\'s students in electrical and computer engineering.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">This fall Katehi was awarded a grant of nearly $4 million by the National Science Foundation for a program aimed at increasing the participation of women, especially Latinas, in academic STEM careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;For our economy to thrive in the future, we need more young women,<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">as well as young men, to have opportunities to study science, engineering and mathematics and pursue careers in these areas,&quot; Katehi said. &quot;The California STEM Learning Network is a leader in advancing STEM education, and I am honored to receive this award.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The California STEM Summit brings together business, government, education, nonprofit and philanthropic luminaries to spark change in STEM education and workforce development, as well as to launch new STEM education initiatives.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Recognizing the dramatic need for increased numbers of women in STEM fields -- only 25 percent of STEM jobs in the United States today are held by women -- the California STEM Learning Network is highlighting accomplished women STEM leaders and supporting initiatives across California to bolster STEM education for female students, noting that women with STEM jobs earn 33 percent more than comparable women in non-STEM jobs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;The California STEM Learning Network is proud to honor these highly accomplished education, industry, nonprofit and civic leaders for their innovative and successful efforts to create world-class STEM education across California,&quot; said Chris Roe, California STEM Learning Network CEO. &quot;Their leadership will ensure that our next generation of leaders is truly reflective of the great diversity and talent that we have in our state.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The honorees, in addition to Katehi, are: Joan Bissell, California State University Chancellor\'s Office; Sandra Birmingham, CSU Channel Islands; Rachel Bondi, Creative Artists Agency; Assemblymember Susan Bonilla (CA-11); Pamela Clute, UC Riverside; Judy D\'Amico, Project Lead the Way; Dawn Garrett, Raytheon; Susan Hackwood, California Council on Science and Technology; Helen Quinn, Stanford University; Carol Tang, Coalition for Science After School; and Nancy Taylor, San Diego Science Alliance.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The California STEM Learning Network is working to bring systemic change to how STEM is taught and learned in the state in order to prepare the nation\'s most STEM-capable graduates. Established as a nonprofit in 2010, CSLNet brings together stakeholders from K-12, higher education, business and industry, governmental agencies, community-based organizations and philanthropies.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Through this cross-sector collaboration, the network fosters innovation and helps to scale and sustain effective STEM teaching and learning in and out of school for all students.
</span><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.dailydemocrat.com/news/ci_21790199/uc-davis-chancellor-woman-stem\">http://www.dailydemocrat.com/news/ci_21790199/uc-davis-chancellor-woman-stem</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">STEM Conference for Girls Accepting Participants<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Ventura-based education firm Upper Hand to College will host a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) conference for girls in grades 6-12 on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 8:30 a.m.to 3:30 p.m. at the UCSB campus. The conference will offer a fun, inspiring and motivational day, geared toward increasing the number of women in STEM fields. The conference features keynote speaker Dr. Anita Sengupta, a NASA scientist who worked on the Mars Curiosity Rover.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Few girls are pursuing careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields. A recent Girl Scout Research Institute study found that 17 percent of high school girls are interested in STEM fields, yet women account for only 20 percent of the bachelor&rsquo;s degrees in engineering, computer science and physics. Furthermore, while women make up nearly 50 percent of the U.S. workforce, they hold less than 25 percent of the jobs in STEM.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We want to help increase the number of women seeking careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields,&rdquo; said Naiyma Houston, Founder and Director of Upper Hand to College. &ldquo;We invite all girls, grades 6-12, to join us for this inspiring and fun-filled day to learn about the variety of career opportunities in STEM fields and meet and connect with female role models.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Girls attending the conference will:<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Engage in hands-on activities and seminars<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Become aware of the wide variety of career opportunities in technology, science and engineering<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Gain a new enthusiasm for STEM<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Meet and connect with awesome female role models<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Learn the importance of taking classes in science, math and technology in middle school and high school<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Leave with the knowledge and understanding that women have the capability to be successful in the professions of science, technology and engineering<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Each student will attend two workshops of their choice. Workshops include: Make Your Own Lip Balm; Build a Water Filter; Fun with Polymers; Create a Prosthetic Hand Model; Create Your Own Hand Sanitizer; Challenge Your Design Skills; Hair Dryer Dissection; Design a Hot Air Balloon; Aquarium Visit; and Campus Tour of UCSB. A description of each workshop is available on the conference registration form.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Upon completion of the day&rsquo;s workshops, participants will earn a Certificate of Participation from the 2012 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Conference.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The conference will also feature a separate track of workshops for parents, teachers and counselors where participants will learn why a STEM education is especially valuable for girls and how to best prepare girls for a STEM education in high school and college. Parents have the opportunity to participate in a Parent Academic Coaching session with Robin McDougal, M.Ed, author of The Pearl Project, and What Color is Your Thinking?<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">To register for the conference, visit <a href=\"http://conta.cc/QeTezE\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">http://conta.cc/QeTezE</span></a> or call (805) 984-2656. The cost to register for students is $20; and $25 for Parents, Teachers, and Counselors.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/28/science-technology-engineering-and-math-stem-confe/\">http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/28/science-technology-engineering-and-math-stem-confe/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UCR professors honored with STEM award<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">At their third-annual summit, the California STEM Learning network honored two female UCR professors and 10 other women with the &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo; statewide award.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Held on Oct. 15 and 16, the two-day conference on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) took place in San Diego, with the attendance of over 350 researchers, educators, policymakers and entrepreneurs. The summit focused on creating new partnerships that would bring more innovative ways in terms of how STEM education is taught, learned and applied.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;The synergy of participants and their total commitment to STEM was amazing,&rdquo; said Dr. Pamela Clute, UC Riverside&rsquo;s assistant vice chancellor of educational and community engagement, executive director of the ALPHA Center and lecturer in math. In an interview with the Highlander, she said the summit gave useful insight on the innovative ways in which teachers could educate students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Dr. Clute was one of the speakers at the summit as well as a recipient of the &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo; award. The award is presented to those who have shown leadership in advancing critical areas of STEM education, including adoption of NEXT Generation Science Standards and advocating for strengthened public-private partnerships and alignment of resources.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;That validation of our work makes us want to do more&hellip; Teachers do change futures and they do change lives because they provide the inspiration that young people need,&rdquo; Dr. Clute said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Susan Hackwood, the executive director of the California Council on Science and Technology and professor at UC Riverside also received the award. Dr. Hackwood is the founding dean of UCR&rsquo;s Bourns College of Engineering and she has overseen the development of all research and teaching aspects of five degree programs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">California is currently ranked 43rd in the nation in undergraduate math and science proficiency. According to the Department of Labor, the fastest growing and best paying occupations are in medicine, engineering, computer science, energy/environment and data communication. Out of these jobs, 63 percent require STEM knowledge and 92 percent require post secondary education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Right now, STEM education is absolutely necessary for a vibrant economy and we need to educate the next generation in these fields,&rdquo; said Dr. Clute.
Her presentation at the summit, &ldquo;Why STEM, Why Partnership,&rdquo; was centered on the grounds of building a partnership between education, businesses, government, media, and faith-based groups to work towards improving STEM education. &ldquo;This is about community and working towards the same goal,&rdquo; she said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chris Roe, the CEO of California STEM Learning Network, said in a recent Press-Enterprise article that adjustments coming to the state&rsquo;s educational curriculum will bring changes in the way STEM education has been taught by both new and veteran teachers.
Other speakers at the summit included State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, ambassador for California&rsquo;s STEM school program and basketball champion Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and scientists from NASA, Google and Pixar.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.highlandernews.org/4971/ucr-professors-honored-with-stem-award/\">http://www.highlandernews.org/4971/ucr-professors-honored-with-stem-award/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Underserved LA youth completes first ever STEM summer program at SIPA<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA) held a special ceremony on October 25 to celebrate the successful completion of the first-ever Summer Science, Technology, Engineering, &amp; Math (STEM) Exploration program. The STEM program, a joint venture between SIPA and Verizon, was a means for underserved Los Angeles youth to be exposed to fields of study which the organizers believe to be important for success in the 21st century.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A total of 40 students participated in the 10-week course which included classroom instruction, applied projects, individual and team competitions, and educational exposure trips. In the educational trips, participants were able to visit local museums and landmarks such as the California Science Center, Peterson Auto Museum, and the Port of Los Angeles.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Among those who completed the program, only 26 attended the ceremony because other students were only in LA for the summer, and had to return to their hometowns when the school year began.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">According to Dennis Arguelles, SIPA Director of Programs, the program sought to &ldquo;build a sense of appreciation&rdquo; in the students for science, technology, engineering and mathematics; and to &ldquo;expose the youth to possible careers in these fields.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Arguelles cited a report by the US Department of Education that noted how the US has lagged behind in global rankings for education in the past few years.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We want to prepare our kids for performing at a high level at the global economy, not just the US economy,&rdquo; Arguelles explained, &ldquo;And we believe that studying these fields is vital to achieving success in the global economy.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Arguelles also expressed his gratitude for the financial grant from Verizon, which was used primarily to conduct the first-ever STEM program by SIPA.&nbsp; Arguelles said that thanks to Verizon&rsquo;s funding, SIPA was able to develop a curriculum that worked best towards their primary objective of catalyzing interest in the youth in STEM subjects.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We were able to experiment and see what works best for our curriculum, and we were able to formalize the foundations of the program,&rdquo; said Arguelles.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;SIPA is very happy to be able to contribute to the future of these children,&rdquo; Arguelles added.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Thanks to the class projects and educational trips, SIPA was able to give valuable STEM exposure to children coming from families with limited financial wherewithal.&nbsp; The creative approach in the program allowed for interesting and engaging discussions that got the students excited for future STEM careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Noah Jeremiah, an 8th grader who delivered a testimonial at the completion ceremony, said that he particularly enjoyed the project that required them to construct their own solar towers and tested those same towers against strong wind currents.&nbsp; He also said that another memorable experience was their tour of the Columbia Memorial Space Center.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Elizabeth, who is also in 8th grade&nbsp; and who has been attending SIPA sessions for about one and a half years now, expressed her sense of pride in her testimonial speech.&nbsp; She won an individual award in one of the STEM contests wherein the students were challenged to build the strongest bridge out of 100 popsicle sticks.&nbsp; The 8th grader also said that STEM was very successful in helping her learn more about physical science, even though she had difficulty learning about it in school.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Eugene Eng, Verizon Vice President for External Affairs, was also in the event for the ceremonial turning over of the check worth $45,000 to SIPA.&nbsp; Eng remarked how it was terrific that SIPA recognized the importance of cultivating a culture of STEM learning among Los Angeles youth.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;STEM skills are core skills that children are going to need in order to be competitive in the 21st century,&rdquo; Eng said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Just based on the reaction, energy, and enthusiasm generated by Joel (Jacinto) and his staff, it is already a good gauge on measuring the success of their approach in teaching STEM to the children.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Eng also said that Verizon will continue to work with SIPA in the future to work on STEM or other noteworthy projects that are in line with the company&rsquo;s corporate social responsibility programs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">SIPA Executive Director Joel Jacinto confirmed that the financial grant was used as a &ldquo;direct support&rdquo; to the SIPA&rsquo;s summer program, of which the STEM modules were a part of. Furthermore, the funds will also be used for the instructional technology equipment and mobile devices that are being integrated into the SIPA curriculum.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;It is important to note that corporate America is interested in us and is starting to invest in the Filipino-American community,&rdquo; Jacinto revealed, &ldquo;It is important that we are benefitting from Verizon&rsquo;s philanthropic program.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.asianjournal.com/community/community-news/17937-underserved-la-youth-completes-first-ever-stem-summer-program-at-sipa.html\">http://www.asianjournal.com/community/community-news/17937-underserved-la-youth-completes-first-ever-stem-summer-program-at-sipa.html</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Twelve California Women Honored as &quot;Leading Women in STEM&quot; for Advancing STEM Education<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Twelve women from across California were honored as &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo; at an awards luncheon at the 2012 California STEM Summit at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel &amp; Marina in San Diego. The Leading Women in STEM awards recognize their achievements in advancing innovative and effective STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education initiatives across the state and serving as exemplary role models for California women and&nbsp;girls.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The California STEM Summit is a statewide leadership convening of business, government, education, nonprofit and philanthropic luminaries to spark change in STEM education and workforce development and launch new STEM education initiatives. The Summit is convened by the nonprofit <a href=\"http://www.cslnet.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California STEM Learning Network</span></a> (CSLNet), which works to bring systemic change to how STEM is taught and learned in California in order to prepare the nation&rsquo;s most STEM-capable&nbsp;graduates.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Recognizing the dramatic need for increasing the number of women in STEM fields &ndash; only 25% of STEM jobs in the U.S. are held by women &ndash; CSLNet is highlighting accomplished women STEM leaders and supporting initiatives across California to bolster STEM education for female students, noting that women with STEM jobs earn 33% more than comparable women in non-STEM&nbsp;jobs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;The California STEM Learning Network is proud to honor these highly accomplished education, industry, non-profit and civic leaders for their innovative and successful efforts to create world-class STEM education across California,&rdquo; said <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Chris+Roe%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Chris Roe</span></a>, California STEM Learning Network CEO. &ldquo;Their leadership will ensure that our next generation of leaders is truly reflective of the great diversity and talent that we have in our&nbsp;state.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Leading Women in STEM honorees are: <o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dr. <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Joan+Bissell%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Joan Bissell</span></a>, Teacher Education and Public School Programs, <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22California+State+University%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California State University</span></a> Chancellor&rsquo;s Office<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Sandra+Birmingham%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Sandra Birmingham</span></a>, STEM Pipeline Outreach Director, California State University, Channel Islands<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Rachel+Bondi%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Rachel Bondi</span></a>, Chief of Mobile Innovation, Creative Artists Agency<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Assemblymember Susan Bonilla (CA-11)<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dr. <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Pamela+Clute%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Pamela Clute</span></a>, Assistant Vice Chancellor Educational and Community Engagement, <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22University+of+California%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">University of California</span></a>, Riverside<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Judy+D%E2%80%99Amico%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Judy D&rsquo;Amico</span></a>, Senior Director of Engagement, Project Lead the Way<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dawn Garrett, SAS Operations Director, Raytheon<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dr. <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Susan+Hackwood%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Susan Hackwood</span></a>, Executive Director, <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22California+Council+on+Science%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California Council on Science</span></a> and Technology<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dr. <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Linda+Katehi%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Linda Katehi</span></a>, Chancellor, UC Davis<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dr. <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Helen+Quinn%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Helen Quinn</span></a>, Professor Emerita, <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Stanford+University%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Stanford University</span></a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Dr. Carol Tang, Director, Coalition for Science After School<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Nancy+Taylor%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Nancy Taylor</span></a>, San Diego County Office of Education/<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22San+Diego+Science+Alliance%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">San Diego Science Alliance</span></a></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Honorees were awarded for their leadership in advancing critical areas of STEM education including adoption of Next Generation Science Standards, strengthening STEM teacher pathways, advocating for strengthened public-private partnerships and alignment of resources, and ensuring all California students have access to high-quality STEM in out-of-school&nbsp;time.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">More about the STEM Summit is at <a href=\"http://www.castemsummit.com/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">http://www.castemsummit.com</span></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/Twelve-California-Women-Honored-as-Leading-Women-3952836.php\">http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/Twelve-California-Women-Honored-as-Leading-Women-3952836.php</a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Colfax High students get up-close look at manufacturing - Colfax Record<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Students from Colfax High School were among those celebrating Manufacturing Day this month. To attract students to highly paid in-demand manufacturing careers, Sierra College is collaborating with businesses, high schools, Placer County and local cities to celebrate Manufacturing Day during October. Businesses across the nation are hosting Manufacturing Day events to promote manufacturing careers and manufacturing\'s value to the U.S. economy.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Sierra Pacific Industries lumber mill in Lincoln hosted Colfax High School Project Lead The Way on Oct. 3. Students toured the co-generation plant, which creates power from its waste to power the plants small- and large-log mills as well as to the city of Lincoln.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;It was an amazing experience to see how a tree is turned into lumber and other useful products,&rdquo; said Colfax High junior Trever Nielsen. &ldquo;I am extremely interested in the engineering aspect of the mill, and seeing the large automated machines in operation was great.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Colfax High math and pre-engineering teacher Jonathan Schwartz said the trip to Lincoln was a &ldquo;fantastic&rdquo; day, and thanked the Sierra College Center for Applied Technologies and to Sierra Pacific Lumber Mill for arranging the tour.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;The 34 students that went on the field trip learned about the milling process and how essential math skills are to just about every aspect of manufacturing,&rdquo; Schwartz said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Carol Pepper-Kittredge, director of the Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies, helped facilitate the tours. &ldquo;Students are inspired when they see appealing work environments and hear about interesting projects from employees,&rdquo; Pepper-Kittredge said. &ldquo;Our goal is to give students a memorable experience that motivates them to pursue mechatronics, welding, engineering, or drafting and engineering support at Sierra College and acquire the skills needed to work for local manufacturers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Local high schools are offering excellent career technical education courses where students are exposed to design, drafting and fabrication using industry 3D design software and manufacturing tools,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;The tours make manufacturers aware that students are earning welding industry certifications, making robotic projects, programming CNC equipment and producing amazing designs.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">According to Dave Snyder, Placer County Economic Development Director, there are approximately 270 manufacturers in Placer County, with an annual payroll of $547 million that employ more than 7,000 residents. On Tuesday, Oct. 30, the Placer County Economic Development Board will host the 2012 Manufacturer&rsquo;s Forum to bring together manufacturers and elected officials. The Placer County Board of Supervisors, the City of Colfax, and other Placer County cities proclaimed Oct. 5 as Manufacturers Day.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies serves manufacturers and technology companies with customized training and technical support; provides entrepreneurs with access to rapid prototyping and other manufacturing technologies; and supports career technical education programs in manufacturing and product development, engineering and design pathways at the high school and college level.</span><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://colfaxrecord.com/detail/222023.html\">http://colfaxrecord.com/detail/222023.html</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:28.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Times;color:black\">Discovery Days at AT&amp;T Park<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:28.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Times;color:black\"><a href=\"http://www.bayareascience.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Field-small.jpg\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black;font-weight:normal;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\"><o:p></o:p></span></a></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">AT&amp;T Park will become a science wonderland when the Bay Area Science Festival concludes again with this FREE science extravaganza on <b>Saturday November 3rd 11AM-4PM</b>. Last year, more than 21,000 people enjoyed a non-stop program chock-full of interactive exhibits, experiments, games, and shows, all meant to entertain and inspire. With more than 150 exhibits, there is something for everyone to unleash their inner scientist.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Parking/Transportation</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">We encourage everyone to take public transportation to the event as we expect</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:#404040\"> </span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">big crowds. AT&amp;T Park is accessible by MUNI, Caltrain, and </span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:#404040\"><a href=\"http://www.bart.gov/\"><span style=\"color:#00A3D5;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">BART</span></a>. </span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">For more information on public transportation options to the ballpark, check out</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:#404040\"> <a href=\"http://sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com/sf/ballpark/directions/index.jsp?content=public_transit\"><span style=\"color:#00A3D5;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">AT&amp;T Park&rsquo;s transit page</span></a>.</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Limited parking will be available in</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:#404040\"> <a href=\"http://sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com/sf/ballpark/directions/index.jsp?content=automobile\"><span style=\"color:#00A3D5;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Lot A</span></a> </span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\n&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">for $10/vehicle.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Chevron STEM Zone</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">&nbsp;&ldquo;Studio C&rdquo;/Technology</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">
This exhibit is a fully-functioning television studio where guests get to experience the technology behind a sports&rsquo; broadcast. &nbsp;Participants will use teleprompters, video cameras, studio lights, audio recording equipment, and green screen technology to create their own broadcast &ndash; which can then be uploaded to our YouTube channel.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">&nbsp;&ldquo;Science of Pitching&rdquo;/Aerodynamics</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">
This demonstration uses compressed air to launch a ping pong ball towards a target (a batter and a catcher&rsquo;s mitt). &nbsp;A small patch of sand paper near the end of the cannon barrel causes the ball to spin as it leaves the barrel. &nbsp;Students can observe how the spin of the ball will affect the flight of the ball toward the plate.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">&nbsp;<b>&ldquo;Energyville&rdquo;/Engineering</b></span></i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Four laptop computers are connected to the internet site</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:#404040\"> <a href=\"http://www.energyville.com/\"><span style=\"color:#00A3D5;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">www.energyville.com</span></a>. &nbsp;</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">Energyville is a game developed by The Economist Group that allows players to control the energy mix of a virtual city and to discover the economic, environmental, and security impacts of their decisions. Come play the game and learn more about the energy sources and demands that shape energy decisions worldwide.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">&ldquo;Gravity Ball Drop&rdquo;/Acceleration due to Gravity</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">
This demonstration shows that the acceleration due to gravity affects all objects equally. &nbsp;The exhibit uses an apparatus to drop 5 different sports balls ranging in size from a golf ball to a bowling ball, at the same time. &nbsp;The exhibit shows that all balls will drop at the same rate. &nbsp;The exhibit also shows that drag will affect the rate of fall.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">&nbsp;<i>Chevron Energy Solutions -&nbsp;The Science of Solar</i></span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Chevron invites visitors to adjust and play with mini-solar panels to &nbsp;capture sunlight and to power a water pump. The better the panels are angled to&nbsp;capture sunlight, the more solar energy is generated to power the water pump.Watch how much faster the water pump transfers water from one bucket to another when the mini-solar panels are angled in the right position to capture the most sunlight.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Techbridge &ndash; Design and &ldquo;carry on&rdquo;!</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">
Come by the Techbridge booth to participate in an opportunity to design a prototype of a carrying device to transport grain (sand). Participants will be provided with basic materials such as recycled plastic grocery bags, cardstock, rubber bands and paper. With these materials, they will have 5 minutes to design the carrying structure and test it on a Barbie doll or another type of doll. This activity will highlight the engineering design process and designing for a cause.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Chabot Space &amp; Science Center -&nbsp;Train Like an Astronaut</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Have fun with our hands-on activities that take you through astronaut training-style exercises. Test your balance skills and how well your brain can adapt to new conditions. Watch what happens to objects as we simulate launching them into space with our vacuum chamber!<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">MARE/Lawrence Hall of Science &ndash; Marine Activities, Resources and Education -&nbsp;Sand on Stage</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Visitors will explore sand samples from around the world with hand&nbsp;lenses and microscopes. By observing the color, size, and shape of sand grains, they will be able to make predictions about the beaches from which the sand came. Are waves on the beach good for surfing? What is the sand made of? How old is the sand? Visitors will also be able to create and take home sand cards to share with others.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><u style=\"text-underline:#404040\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">RAFT (Resource Area for Teaching)</span></u></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
<b>Glove-a-phone</b>
Combine a straw, glove and tube to make a &ldquo;note&rdquo; worthy sound activity.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Colors of Light</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Discover the rainbow in white light with this easy to build spectroscope.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Puff Rocket</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Experiment with air pressure as you propel a straw rocket with a simple squeeze.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\"><o:p></o:p></span><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Rollback Can</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Learn about potential and kinetic energy as you roll the can and it rolls back to you!<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Richmond High School, Robotics Program -&nbsp;Shooting hoops with G6</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
Come shoot some hoops with G6!&nbsp; See how the robot built by the students performs on the court shooting basketballs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;color:black\">Girls Inc. -&nbsp;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powered Vehicle and HTML Coding</span></i></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;;\ncolor:black\">
We will provide a model of an alternative vehicle energy source, and providing an explanation on how it works. Allowing the participants to examine and operate the model. Youth will learn how easy and simple HTML coding is to design a website on their own.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:22.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/discovery-days-at-att-park/\">http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/discovery-days-at-att-park/</a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Alcoa Foundation Awards Simi Valley Education Foundation $15,000 Grant To Support STEM Project in Simi Valley Unified School District <o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Simi Valley Education Foundation announced the award of $15,000 grant from Alcoa Foundation to support a new STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) project in the Simi Valley Unified School District. This generous grant will incorporate the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT education kits into a STEM Enrichment Program. Use of robotics brings science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to life for students!<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Under the direction of the Simi Valley Unified School District Director of Secondary Education and Director of Elementary Education, the STEM Enrichment Program will be utilized in grades 4-6 in elementary schools and in all three middle school and all four high schools in the Simi Valley Unified School District. The year will culminate with a robotics night where students will share what they have learned and created.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Kevin Casey, Director/General Manager and Jim Vigdor, Operations Manager, both from Alcoa Fastening Systems in Simi Valley, personally delivered the check to the Foundation at a recent Board meeting. &ldquo;Alcoa is delighted to partner with the Simi Valley Education Foundation again this year. By investing in STEM education, we can play an active role in shaping and supporting curriculum and creating hands-on opportunities to keep students engaged,&rdquo; Jim Vigdor said. To date, Alcoa Fastening Systems has provided $132,000 in grants to the Foundation.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As one of the largest global mining, manufacturing and engineering companies, Alcoa sees a huge opportunity when they provide grants to help prepare students in the areas where they are seeing a tremendous skills gap: science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM).<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Simi Valley Education Foundation believes that an excellent public education is every child&rsquo;s right and is committed to providing programs and funds to enhance the learning experience of the students in Simi Valley.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">For more information visit the <a href=\"http://www.svef.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">http://www.svef.org</span></a> or call 877-SIMI-KID.</span><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/23/alcoa-foundation-awards-simi-valley-education-foun/\">http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/23/alcoa-foundation-awards-simi-valley-education-foun/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Google partners with CSU to bolster STEM education in California<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A brain trust of educators, philanthropists and business leaders convened in San Diego to discuss how science, technology, engineering and math &ndash; STEM subjects &ndash; are taught in California schools.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The summit wrapped up Tuesday afternoon - but not before honoring a dozen &ldquo;Leading Women in STEM&rdquo;, all of whom work in science and technology-driven fields. Including LA&rsquo;s own, Rachel Bondi, Chief of Mobile Innovations for the talent agency, CAA.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The other big reveal: a $25,000 grant that partners Google with the California State University System, and the California STEM Learning Network &ndash; the nonprofit that hosted the conference.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">All three organizations are members of the &ldquo;100K in 10&rdquo; campaign &ndash; a program the Obama administration launched to recruit 100,000 new STEM teachers over the next decade. &nbsp;(An attempt to thwart the looming shortage of STEM teachers across the country.)<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chris Roe, CEO of the California STEM Learning Network, said he learned about the award &ldquo;a few days ago.&rdquo; Roe said the initiative will support new science and math elementary teachers in STEM through an online professional learning community. Enrolled teachers will receive graduate credit transferable to a Master&rsquo;s Degree.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Within California&rsquo;s education budget, $25,000 is barely a blip on the radar, but Roe insists that the money will go a long way toward improving STEM education statewide.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;It&rsquo;s often times the small money at the margins that can create the incentives for groups to work together that might not otherwise do so.&nbsp; So I think the grant amount is very small but what it does is it changes behavior.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Roe said the collaboration will roll out slowly. A few Cal State campuses will begin to offer the online courses shortly after the holidays.&nbsp;</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2012/10/17/10528/google-awards-grant-bolster-stem-education-califor/\">http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2012/10/17/10528/google-awards-grant-bolster-stem-education-califor/</a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">NBA Great Named Calif. After-School STEM Ambassador<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the National Basketball Association\'s all-time leading scorer, will be promoting the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects over the next year as California\'s After-School STEM Ambassador, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced Monday.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Torlakson revealed the news about Abdul-Jabbar at the third annual <a href=\"http://www.castemsummit.com/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California STEM Summit</span></b></a>, where the basketball superstar <a href=\"http://www.castemsummit.com/program/summit-day-1/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">was set to deliver a keynote address</span></b></a> toward the end of the day.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;If America is to maintain our high standard of living, we must continue to innovate,&quot; said Abdul-Jabbar in a statement. &quot;We are competing with nations many times our size, and STEM learning represents the engines of innovation. With these engines, we can lead the world, because knowledge is real power.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As California After-School STEM Ambassador, Abdul-Jabbar will make appearances at after-school programs around the state over the next year to promote STEM education. The California STEM Learning Network, which my colleague Nora Fleming wrote extensively about <a href=\"http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/01/05/15stem.h31.html\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">earlier this year</span></b></a>, convened the STEM Summit in its mission to improve STEM education throughout the state.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Believe it or not, Abdul-Jabbar has invested considerable time promoting STEM education over the past few years. Through his <a href=\"http://www.skyhookfoundation.org/about/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Skyhook Foundation</span></b></a>, which he <a href=\"http://kareemabduljabbar.com/?p=1033\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">started in 2009</span></b></a>, Abdul-Jabbar has been actively promoting the importance of STEM education and STEM-related careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">On Jan. 18, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton appointed Abdul-Jabbar as a <a href=\"http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2012/01/181300.htm\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">U.S. Global Cultural Ambassador</span></b></a>. In that role, which he\'ll continue throughout the rest of 2012, Abdul-Jabbar has been traveling around the world to discuss the importance of education and cultural tolerance.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Earlier this summer, he also <a href=\"http://www.skyhookfoundation.org/resources/KAJOpeningStemStatement.pdf\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">spoke</span></b></a> at <i>U.S. News and World Report</i>\'s STEM Conference in Dallas, saying, &quot;STEM education is the key to gainful employment for all of the young people we serve.&quot; At the conference, Abdul-Jabbar hammered on the cultural shift that\'s necessary to make STEM jobs more attractive to youths, especially in lower-income communities.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;They see themselves only being able to be successful in the area of sports or entertainment,&quot; Abdul-Jabbar said at the summit, <a href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/high-school-notes/2012/06/28/abdul-jabar-more-opportunities-to-turn-pro-in-science-than-in-the-nba\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">according to <i>U.S. News</i></span></b></a>. &quot;If they can\'t be Jay-Z or LeBron James, they don\'t think they can be successful.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Abdul-Jabbar pointed out that while there are only 450 NBA jobs available at any one time (30 teams with 15 players on each, not counting the Developmental League), there are &quot;thousands upon thousands of engineering jobs&quot; available.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">He made the same point in an <a href=\"http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/stem-education/2012/05/17/kareem-abdul-jabbar-media-makes-kids-believe-they-can-be-next-lebron-or-jay-z\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">interview</span></b></a> with <i>U.S. News</i> back in May, saying that youths would be &quot;better off if they have a lot of opportunities to choose from, not just sports or entertainment. And they will have those additional opportunities if we continue to emphasize education, especially in STEM classes.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Abdul-Jabbar\'s role as STEM ambassador could take on extra importance in California, as a November 2011 <a href=\"http://www.cftl.org/documents/2011/StrengtheningScience_full.pdf\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">report</span></b></a> from WestEd found that a majority of elementary students in the state weren\'t being exposed to high-quality science instruction, according to my colleague Erik Robelen on the <a href=\"http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2011/11/many_california_elementary_stu.html\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Curriculum Matters blog</span></b></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/schooled_in_sports/2012/10/kareem_abdul-jabbar_named_calif_after-school_stem_ambassador.html\">http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/schooled_in_sports/2012/10/kareem_abdul-jabbar_named_calif_after-school_stem_ambassador.html</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b style=\"mso-bidi-font-weight:normal\"><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino;\nmso-bidi-font-style:italic\">California STEM Summit Convenes Business, Education, Policy and Philanthropic Leaders to Launch Statewide STEM Teaching, Learning and Job Creation Initiatives.</span></b><b style=\"mso-bidi-font-weight:\nnormal\"><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">With California business, civic and education leaders sounding alarm bells about shortages of highly trained workers and the vital need to bolster science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, the <a href=\"http://www.cslnet.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California STEM Learning Network</span></a>(CSLNet) is convening business, government, education, nonprofit and philanthropic luminaries to launch new STEM education initiatives at the <a href=\"http://www.castemsummit.com/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">2012 California STEM Summit</span></a> taking place October 15 and 16 at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel &amp; Marina in San Diego,&nbsp;California.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Despite record unemployment, California employers say they can&rsquo;t find enough STEM-capable candidates, with 1.4 STEM jobs open for every qualified job seeker. This increased demand for STEM workers comes as California lags behind other states in math and science proficiency, and as comparably fewer of its students graduate with STEM&nbsp;degrees.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The goal of the <a href=\"http://www.castemsummit.com/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">California STEM Summit</span></a> is to spark change in STEM education and workforce development. The Summit will launch and advance new initiatives designed to boost STEM education from Pre-K to college, including programs to recruit and train teachers and bolster STEM offerings during out-of-school-time settings. Attendees will also learn about the new Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards and how together they provide a framework for high-quality STEM education for California&rsquo;s more than six million K-12 students. California STEM Summit speakers include: <o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;NBA legend and education champion <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Kareem+Abdul-Jabbar%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Kareem Abdul-Jabbar</span></a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Education scientist and TED Talk luminary Dr. Sugata Mitra<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Assemblywoman <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Susan+Bonilla%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Susan Bonilla</span></a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-left:.5in;text-indent:-.5in;mso-text-indent-alt:\n-.5in;mso-pagination:none;mso-list:l0 level1 lfo1;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;\nmso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22David+Seidel%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">David Seidel</span></a> of NASA&rsquo;s <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Jet+Propulsion+Laboratory%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Jet Propulsion Laboratory</span></a>, who will share findings from the Mars rover Curiosity expedition and discuss how NASA is making these resources available to educators.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\">The Summit will also recognize Leading Women in STEM across the state and feature a Student STEM Showcase, with hands-on demonstrations of award-winning science, technology, engineering and math innovations by&nbsp;students.</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;All California students deserve access to world-class STEM education that prepares them for academic, career and personal success,&rdquo; said <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Chris+Roe%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Chris Roe</span></a>, California STEM Learning Network CEO. &ldquo;The California STEM Summit serves as a catalyst to advance high quality STEM education and prepare California&rsquo;s future workforce so our state can continue to lead the world in innovation and new job&nbsp;creation.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">California boasts more patents and Nobel Prize winners than any other state and is home to nearly one million STEM workers, more than 13% of the nation&rsquo;s overall STEM workforce. More about the STEM Summit is at <a href=\"http://www.castemsummit.com/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">http://www.castemsummit.com</span></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-Business-Education-Civic-Leaders-3939728.php\">http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-Business-Education-Civic-Leaders-3939728.php&nbsp;</a></o:p></span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Lt. Gov. Talks Jobs, Education at Cal Poly Pomona<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\">Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom admonished California for getting away from its roots as a &ldquo;state of dreamers and doers&rdquo; Tuesday.</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Newsom, along with business and education leaders, participated in Cal Poly Pomona&rsquo;s Engineering and Cyber Security Workforce Development Summit.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Students, alumni, and faculty attended the on-campus event, which included panel discussions on the future of workplace development, aerospace and cyber security.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Newsom said as someone fairly new to state government, he considers himself a &ldquo;frustrated optimist&rdquo; with regards to the California&rsquo;s economic and educational future.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I think the state needs to step up its game,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp; &ldquo;I think the state needs to get back in the future business.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Between 1950 and 1980, no state grew more jobs than California, which had a 3.7 percent annual growth rate during those decades, he said.&nbsp; In the past 30 years, that growth has stalled to around 1.1 percent annually, he added, pointing to complacency as a problem.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We have become average,&rdquo; he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Newsom, who sits on the board of trustees for the CSU system, pointed to education cuts, adding that California&rsquo;s public universities saw more then $2 billion slashed last year.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">He said it took 143 years to build up the University of California system, and now it is in peril because of cuts.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Were not just cutting into the muscle and the bone, even here at CSUs, we&rsquo;re cutting into the artery,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;When you don&rsquo;t have a plan for cuts, you cut the wrong place and you bleed out.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A solid future requires investment in education, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;You can&rsquo;t have an economic development strategy without a workforce development strategy,&rdquo; he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The lack of training in key fields also is an issue, specifically those involving technology.&nbsp; The state has more than 500,000 jobs available that employers can&rsquo;t fill because the skill set is not there, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got to educate past or at least up to technology,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp; &ldquo;We&rsquo;re not conveying enough talent.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Newsom called for more partnerships between businesses and colleges and universities.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The challenge to get back to greatness is to give up the idea that Sacramento needs to be the place of inspiration, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;There is not a problem in this state, economic or otherwise, that hasn&rsquo;t been solved by somebody somewhere,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;So the challenge is scaling it.&nbsp; Go local. Regions rising together. Don&rsquo;t wait around for Sacramento.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Business leaders from companies such as Visa, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ducommun Inc., and Occidental Petroleum Corp. talked about the importance of luring college graduates from the STEM&nbsp; (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields to work in their industries, the skills needed to get hired, and the average six-figure salaries that come with those jobs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Per Beith, Boeing&rsquo;s director of global network operations, said his company has hired many engineers from Cal Poly Pomona and is looking for employees who have software, network, and electronics skills.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Also needed are leaders, as long-time employees get set to retire, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Don&rsquo;t just think about your technical skills,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp; &ldquo;Think of your leadership skills because your opportunity to grow at an accelerated rate at companies like Boeing I think is unsurpassed.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">William Leubke, technical director of the Corona-based NAVSEA, also said Cal Poly graduates play a big role in his agency.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Around 10 percent of NAVSEA&rsquo;s workforce comes from Cal Poly Pomona, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Mayar Amouzegar, dean of Cal Poly&rsquo;s College of engineering, said that the university has one of the largest engineering programs in the country.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">One out of 14 engineers in California comes from Cal Poly, he said.&nbsp; Companies have been receiving talented students from the colleges, but with very little investment back into the future of the university\'s engineering and science programs. That needs to change, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I am looking not to Sacramento to help us grow, but I am looking local at our partner companies,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp; &ldquo;To continue to produce wonderful engineers and scientists, we need investment and not necessarily all from Sacramento.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span>&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://claremont-laverne.patch.com/articles/lt-gov-gavin-newsom-visits-cal-poly-pomona\">http://claremont-laverne.patch.com/articles/lt-gov-gavin-newsom-visits-cal-poly-pomona</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Large Grant Aims to Increase Number of Math, Science Teachers<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">National Science Foundation grant will help Claremont Graduate University recruit and train math and science teachers for high-need public school districts.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Claremont Graduate University has received a grant of nearly $800,000 from the <a href=\"http://www.nsf.gov/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">National Science Foundation</span></a> to recruit and train math and science teachers for high-need public school districts.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The grant, funded through the NSF\'s <a href=\"http://nsfnoyce.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">Robert Noyce Scholarship Program</span></a>, will enable CGU\'s <a href=\"http://www.cgu.edu/ses\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">School of Educational Studies</span></a> to develop 40 new teachers over the next five years. These NSF Teaching Fellows will receive national exposure, significant financial support, and continued professional opportunities through this program, according to a news release from he graduate school.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We want to find the top undergraduate college students in the science, technology, engineering and math fields and put them on the path to the classroom and school leadership,&rdquo; Lisa Loop, co-director of Claremont Graduate University\'s <a href=\"http://www.cgu.edu/pages/1642.asp\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Teacher Education Internship Program</span></a> wrote. &ldquo;This grant allows us to offer scholarships and other support to graduates who have a passion to help the next generation and who want to make a difference, especially in high need areas and minority communities.&rdquo;

<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The United States has a critical need for qualified teachers in the science, technology, engineering, and math fields, and has established a goal of preparing 100,000 of them over the next decade. Traditionally, too few of the best undergraduate students have chosen to teach.

<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Robert Noyce Scholarship Program aims to remedy this problem by funding scholarships, extra support, and recruitment campaigns to attract graduates with science, technology, engineering and math backgrounds who might otherwise not have considered careers in teaching. 

<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">NSF Teaching Fellows will leave the graduate school in as little as one year with master\'s degrees in education or applied mathematics and California teaching credentials. In exchange, they are required to complete two years of teaching in high-need school districts for each year of financial support. 

<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The university will partner in its recruitment efforts with the five undergraduate schools in the Claremont College Consortium: <a href=\"http://www.hmc.edu/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Harvey Mudd</span></a>, <a href=\"http://www.cmc.edu/discovercmc/index.php\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Claremont McKenna</span></a>, <a href=\"http://www.pomona.edu/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">Pomona</span></a>, <a href=\"http://www.scrippscollege.edu/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Scripps</span></a>, and <a href=\"http://www.pitzer.edu/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">Pitzer</span></a> Colleges. It will also launch a recruitment campaign at <a href=\"http://www.tsu.edu/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Texas Southern University</span></a> to increase the enrollment of African-American candidates, though graduates from any other university are encouraged to apply.

<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">This is the second time Claremont Graduate University has received a grant from the Robert Noyce Scholarship Program. In 2005, the university was awarded $460,000 it used to recruit and train 40 STEM teachers, 38 of whom remain in the classroom today. The project&rsquo;s directors are <a href=\"http://www.cgu.edu/pages/388.asp\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">David Drew</span></a>, education professor at CGU, and <a href=\"http://www.math.hmc.edu/%7Edyong/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Darryl Yong</span></a>, mathematics professor at Harvey Mudd College, along with Loop. &nbsp;</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://claremont-laverne.patch.com/articles/large-grant-aims-to-increase-number-of-math-science-teachers\">http://claremont-laverne.patch.com/articles/large-grant-aims-to-increase-number-of-math-science-teachers</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Green Engineering Academy Students find Energy Savings<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Students in the Green Engineering Academy at Livermore High School (LHS) are looking for ways to make their school even greener by reducing energy usage. Over the summer, several students worked with KW Engineering on a facilities energy audit of the LHS campus and several area schools.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The audit uncovered about $35,000 in potential savings from simple changes, such as upgrading to more efficient light bulbs and computers, installing programmable thermostats, eliminating unnecessary lighting, and running pumps on the school pool only as needed. For the students, it was a chance to put into practice some of the engineering skills they have been learning in the classroom.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;The students experienced the non-geeky side of engineering,&rdquo; says LHS teacher Mike Waltz, who leads the Green Engineering Academy. &ldquo;I think it was cool for them to see what engineers really do and get some recognition for helping their school and the environment. Plus, they&rsquo;ve made connections with the engineers at KW and other partners in this project, so they now have new resources and mentors.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The audit is part of the Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE)&rsquo;s Leadership in Energy Efficiency Program (LEEP), which is funded by PG&amp;E&rsquo;s Innovator Pilot Program. LEEP provides financially constrained local school districts access to a centralized resource for energy efficiency expertise and energy management assistance. LEEP also partners with green jobs education programs like the LHS Green Engineering Academy to provide hands-on field training and resume-building opportunities for students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">After LEEP was established two years ago, the ACOE reached out to all of the school districts in the County. The Livermore School District&rsquo;s conservation committee seized the opportunity and soon reached out to Waltz.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We are thrilled to be in this partnership with the Alameda County Office of Education and PG&amp;E,&rdquo; says Livermore School Superintendent Kelly Bowers. &ldquo;This project really ties into our goal of ensuring that our students graduate with the skills to contribute and thrive in a changing world. Energy conservation is a big part of that changing world.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">While most of their friends were sleeping late, the Green Engineering Academy students were up bright and early over the summer to meet with the KW engineers for training and to visit school sites. They conducted audits of LHS, Granada High School, Amador Valley High School, and Alisal Elementary School in Pleasanton.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Although some of the students&rsquo; tasks seemed tedious &mdash; like counting light bulbs and checking the clocks on programmable thermostats &ndash; they are key components of a thorough energy audit. &ldquo;When we conduct a facility audit, we make a lot of estimates because we don&rsquo;t have time to get that specific,&rdquo; says Duane Kubischta of KW Engineering. &ldquo;The students know their campus best.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">LHS student Natasha Moore learned a lot doing the energy audit. &ldquo;It was really interesting to see what was happening at the different school sites,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;I was surprised to learn that people actually learn better in natural light and that just changing to a different light bulb can save so much energy and money. Simple things can cause big problems.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The students will work with KW Engineering on audits of schools in several Bay Area cities. Waltz says the students also may conduct audits at other Livermore schools. That supports the efforts of the conservation committee, led by consultant David Darlington who ran Environmental Education for Kids (EEK!) for many years.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;The primary business of schools is to educate. This is outside of their purview. So this committee is looking at absolutely every way to reduce consumption,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;The District spends nearly two million dollars each year on gas and electric. Our goal is to cut that in half in five years.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A classic example, adds Darlington, is an ice machine in a custodial closet at Granada High School. &ldquo;This was an old-fashioned ice machine that was rarely used. It was consuming 3.5 gallons of water a minute and 22 amps of electricity, an annual cost of $11,000,&rdquo; he says.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Other changes are occupancy sensors on vending machines, which turn off cooling when they are not in use, and upgrading lights in multipurpose rooms and gymnasiums district-wide. The cost to upgrade to energy efficient lights and appliances is mitigated by rebates.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">This school year, the conservation committee began a competition among school sites to reduce energy consumption. Each quarter, school sites will receive 50% of the money saved from reduced energy consumption compared with the same quarter a year earlier. Darlington says that in the first quarter, from July through September, energy costs are down by about $56,000.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m looking forward to seeing how our sites can continue to reduce consumption,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;The goal of cutting our energy bill in half in five years is ambitious, but it&rsquo;s good to aim high.&rdquo;</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.independentnews.com/community/article_3f590df2-0e6b-11e2-b4b1-0019bb2963f4.html\">http://www.independentnews.com/community/article_3f590df2-0e6b-11e2-b4b1-0019bb2963f4.html</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Partnering to Power the Future of California&rsquo;s STEM Education<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">At first glance, the <a href=\"http://cslnet.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California STEM Learning Network</span></a> (CSLNet) and the <a href=\"http://www.afterschoolnetwork.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">California Afterschool Network</span></a> may seem odd partners. One is an organization focused on boosting learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. The other, a statewide network building the quality and capacity of afterschool care across the state.&nbsp; But together they share a great concern about the future of California&rsquo;s students and their access to high quality STEM education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Currently, California&rsquo;s students face a vexing challenge: they have too few opportunities &ndash; during the traditional school day and during out-of-school time &ndash; to participate in the hands-on exploration of science and other STEM subjects that are vital to their futures. That&rsquo;s why CSLNet and the California Afterschool Network have joined together in common purpose to expand access to high quality STEM learning opportunities.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">To that end, we&rsquo;ve teamed up to launch <a href=\"http://stem.afterschoolnetwork.org/rfq\"><i><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">The Power of Discovery: STEM</span></i><i><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:15.0pt;color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:\nnone\">2</span></sup></i></a></span><b><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n15.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">,</span></sup></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> a new initiative to greatly expand STEM Learning Opportunities for young people in out-of-school time settings. <i>The Power of Discovery: STEM</i></span><i><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:15.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">2</span></sup></i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> will build and support partnerships between schools, after school organizations, and community partners such as museums and zoos, to strengthen their capacity to provide high quality STEM Learning opportunities.&nbsp; Mobilizing a broad coalition of partners, including higher education, business and industry and others with the STEM expertise and resources, this initiative will engage students in the hands-on exploration and practice of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As a first step, with funding and support from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, Noyce Foundation and the Samueli Foundation, <i>The Power of Discovery: STEM</i></span><i><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n15.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">2</span></sup></i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> initiative has funded three regional partnerships to serve as Regional Innovation Providers, offering critical support for STEM learning in selected regions across California. These regional partnerships will work to foster leadership and build effective partnerships between after school providers, schools and community organizations. Regional Innovation Providers will also support efforts to build the capacity of out-of-school time programs to expand quality STEM learning opportunities that generate interest in learning and further student understanding of the concepts of the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Power of Discovery: STEM</span></i><i><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:15.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">2</span></sup></i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> will initially leverage more than 4,500 statewide after school programs to engage students in high quality STEM learning opportunities.&nbsp; That&rsquo;s a promising start, but we&rsquo;re just beginning. With new partners, innovation providers and public-private-philanthropic sector collaborations, we look forward to expanding STEM in out-of-school time learning opportunities for greater and greater numbers of students, opening new doors of opportunity during and far beyond their academic careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Power of Discovery: STEM</span></i></b><b><i><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:15.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">2 </span></sup></i></b><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Regional Innovation Providers</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Six talented organizations have been selected to collaborate in three regional partnerships that will serve as Regional Innovation Support Providers to expand STEM learning in California. Each organization received a grant award of $70,000 and will work collaboratively to foster leadership, build partnerships and provide capacity-building to support high quality STEM in out-of-school time programs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Greater Bay Area</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The<i> </i>Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE), the Gateways East Bay STEM Network and the Tech Museum of Innovation in the Silicon Valley were selected to jointly facilitate cross-sector partnerships, and provide tools, resources, and support to increase high quality STEM learning Opportunities in at least 250&nbsp;after school program sites across eleven Bay Area counties including Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Sacramento/Northern California</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The Sacramento County Office of Education (SCOE) will work with partners such as UC Davis, the Powerhouse Science Center, SCOE&rsquo;s After School Office and Science and Math Curriculum Departments to create and offer STEM training, program planning and implementation support to administrators and staff to at least 125 afterschool program sites across ten regional counties including Alpine, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Orange County/San Diego</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In Southern California, the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) and Orange County STEM Initiative (OC STEM) will partner to increase high quality STEM learning opportunities in at least 250 after school program sites across Imperial, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego Counties. SDCOE and OC STEM will facilitate cross-sector partnerships, inclusive of institutions of higher education, industry, and community based organizations to accelerate student learning and build the capacity of out-of-school time programs to offer meaningful STEM learning opportunities.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://toped.svefoundation.org/2012/10/04/partnering-to-power-the-future-of-california&rsquo;s-stem-education/\">http://toped.svefoundation.org/2012/10/04/partnering-to-power-the-future-of-california&rsquo;s-stem-education/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">USD gets $20 million for engineering school<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:24.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><a href=\"http://www.utsandiego.com/photos/2012/sep/24/692529/\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;color:#1B0981;font-weight:normal;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\"><o:p></o:p></span></a></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:28.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Philanthropist Darlene Shiley is donating $20 million to the <a href=\"http://www.sandiego.edu/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">University of San Diego</span></a> to enable the campus to create a school of engineering in a region where two large universities are already competing for the best students in one of the hottest fields in academia.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:28.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The new gift will let USD transform its small but growing <a href=\"http://www.sandiego.edu/engineering/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">engineering department</span></a> into a school through the hiring of a dean, support workers, long term improvements to classroom and research space, as well as student scholarships.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m doing this because my late husband, Donald, was, at his core, an engineer whose work helped save the lives of 400,000 people,&rdquo; said Shiley. &ldquo;I&rsquo;d like to see USD turn out one or two engineers like him.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><a href=\"http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2010/jul/31/heart-valve-inventor-philanthropist-shiley-dies-ag/\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:\nnone\">Donald Shiley</span></a></span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;\nfont-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> invented heart valves that went into wide use in the 1970s, profoundly changing heart care, and making him one of the country&rsquo;s first practicing bioengineers. He was educated at the University of Portland, which would later receive a $12 million gift from the Shileys to improve its engineering school.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The $20 million that Darlene Shiley is giving USD is the largest gift the campus has received from a single donor since the late Joan B. Kroc bequeathed about $50 million in 2003. The Shiley family earlier gave USD $13.5 million for a science and technology center, theater renovations and the Masters in Fine Arts program. The latest gift makes Darlene Shiley and her husband Donald, who died in 2010, USD&rsquo;s second largest benefactor in university history.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;This is another in a series of very transformative gifts from the Shileys, and Mrs. Shiley,&rdquo; said USD President Mary E. Lyons. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going to have our own free-standing School of Engineering.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The USD engineering program, which is offered only at the undergraduate level, has tripled to 363 students since 2004, reflecting the growth of the discipline nationwide. US News and World Report ranked USD&rsquo;s program 25th best in the country among engineering schools where the highest degree is a bachelor&rsquo;s or Master&rsquo;s degree.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">USD doesn&rsquo;t have immediate plans to introduce a doctoral program, or to significantly increase undergraduate enrollment. &ldquo;Quality over quantity is what we&rsquo;re focused on,&rdquo; said President Lyons.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">She added the USD is more likely to complement the large engineering programs at the University of California San Diego and San Diego State University, which focus on many areas, especially such traditional disciplines as civil engineering. USD offers bachelor&rsquo;s degrees in electrical, mechanical, and industrial and systems engineering.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Enrollment in engineering programs has been rising, especially in regions like San Diego County, where there are large numbers of defense, electronics and biotech companies like General Atomics, Northrop Grumman and Qualcomm, who who need workers. Simply earning an undergraduate degree in engineering leads to a good-paying job, says the <a href=\"http://www.payscale.com/best-colleges/degrees.asp\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">2011-2012 PayScale College Salary Report</span></a>. Seven of the top 10 jobs in the report are for people who majored in engineering. For example, the starting median salary for an undergraduate who studied petroleum engineering is $97,900. The figure is $61,300 for an electrical engineering, a discipline taught at USD. The starting median pay for people with psychology degrees is $35,000, and it is $41,000 for those with a business degree.</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/sep/25/usd-given-20-million-create-engineering-school/\">http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/sep/25/usd-given-20-million-create-engineering-school/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC Davis wins grants to study the effects of robotics in teaching<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Two new grants awarded to UC Davis by the National Science Foundation will study the effect of robotics in teaching science, technology, engineering and math from elementary to high school.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Both projects are led by Harry Cheng, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the UC Davis K-14 Outreach Center for Computing and STEM Education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Robotics involves a variety of math, information technology, and engineering concepts,&quot; Cheng said. &quot;Introducing computing and robotics into the math and science curriculum helps make abstract ideas concrete and allows students to apply mathematical concepts to real world problems.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The C-STEM Center also will hold a Fall Robotics Academy for school teachers on the weekend of Oct. 13-14. The class will train teachers to use robots and computing in their classrooms.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;These recent NSF awards to the UCD C-STEM Center are a tremendous validation of the incredible work being done by Harry Cheng and his colleagues,&quot; said Enrique Lavernia, dean of the College of Engineering. &quot;It\'s critical that we develop creative and innovative approaches to K-12 instruction, to assure the successful realization of every student\'s potential. Professor Cheng has confronted the challenge of math engagement with middle school and high school students with an innovative approach using the latest in computing and robotics technology.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The larger grant, from NSF\'s National Robotics Initiative, provides $950,000 over three years to study<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">how the use of robotics programs in schools can change kids\' attitudes to science, technology, engineering and math subjects. Co-investigators on the grant are Professor Jean Vandergheynst, associate dean for undergraduate studies in the College of Engineering and co-director of the C-STEM center; and Tobin White, associate professor in the UC Davis School of Education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The project will recruit teachers from Sacramento area schools from grades six and up and provide them with robots, teaching resources and training in how to integrate computing and robotics in their teaching with engaging, fun activities for real-world problem solving.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Their students will be able to enter the RoboPlay Competitions run by the C-STEM Center. RoboPlay is designed to let K-12 students use robots while exploring their creativity in writing, art, music, choreography, design and filmmaking, and at the same time seamlessly learn and apply computing and STEM concepts to solve practical problems.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A second recent grant, of $300,000 over two years from the NSF\'s Cyberlearning: Transforming Education program, will fund a study of how robots and handheld computers can be used specifically in teaching algebra. That study will involve two schools in Washington Unified School District in West Sacramento.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The UCD robotics curriculum helps students excel, Cheng said -- especially students who do not typically do well in middle-school math and related subjects.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Together with another grant received in June 2011, the center has now received a total of three NSF grants totaling almost $1.8 million in the past 18 months to support its educational outreach work.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In addition to the Fall Academy, the center also organizes an annual two-week Summer Institute for teachers and a weekend Winter Academy in January. The marquee event is the annual UC Davis C-STEM Day, held this year in May, which combines a conference and workshop on computing and STEM education with robotics competitions for students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.dailydemocrat.com/ci_21620546/robot-teachers-may-one-day-be-providing-instruction\">http://www.dailydemocrat.com/ci_21620546/robot-teachers-may-one-day-be-providing-instruction<br type=\"_moz\" />\n</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC Berkeley adopts mentorship program for women in STEM majors<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As part of a larger effort to increase female participation in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, UC Berkeley has signed on to be a lead institution in a new online mentorship program designed to encourage young female undergraduates to enter STEM fields.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The program, called&nbsp;<a href=\"https://piazza.com/witson\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">Women in Technology Sharing Online (WitsOn)</span></a>, is a six-week national program that will take place on Piazza, an online forum site employed by students and professors to ask and answer questions about class material, such as homework and exams.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Pooja Sankar, the founder of Piazza, had the idea for this program,&rdquo; said Maria Klawe, the president of Harvey Mudd College, which is a sponsor of the program. &ldquo;She felt quite shy because she was one of three female computer science majors at the Indian Institutes of Technology (Kanpur campus) and, through her own experience, thought that girls in these fields didn&rsquo;t have enough role models.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">According to Klawe, the program, which starts Oct. 1, is not a formal class but rather an online community for mentors from these industries to share their experiences and impart advice to prospective students wanting to pursue careers in the fields.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Klawe said that mentors for the program must be females who have already earned their undergraduate degrees in one of the STEM fields and be able to commit at least one hour on their assigned day to answering questions posed by students on the program site. She said that 365 women have already signed up to be mentors for the program nationally, and, at this rate, she expects that the program will have more than 500 mentors by its start.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Computer science and engineering fields don&rsquo;t see a lot of women, and we actually know why,&rdquo; Klawe said. &ldquo;A lot of young women don&rsquo;t think they will be good in these fields because images in the media show that these fields are male-dominated.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Klawe, a renowned computer scientist who has made significant research contributions to her field, is one of six lead mentors in the program, which is designed to have a different lead mentor every week along with several other mentors to answer students&rsquo; questions daily.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">According to Klawe, though the program is aimed at undergraduate students, graduate students wishing to participate can sign up to be mentors.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I would have loved to have a mentor who was active in the field to help motivate my undergraduate courses &mdash; that is, give me perspective on exactly what was important to extract from my classes,&rdquo; said Leah Anderson, a third-year doctoral student in systems engineering in the civil and environmental engineering department who has signed on to be a mentor, in an email.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Signing up to participate in the program is simple, according to Colette Patt, the diversity director of the Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences in the UC Berkeley College of Letters and Science. Undergraduate students currently enrolled in a class that uses Piazza can sign up for the program instantly online. Students not using Piazza can request enrollment or ask faculty members to sign them up.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The program is also open to male undergraduates.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Women who are mentored by men really value that mentoring relationship, because it can be incredibly productive and valuable,&rdquo; Patt said. &ldquo;The same can be true in the opposite direction.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">This is not the only program on campus aimed at increasing female involvement in STEM fields. The Society for Women in Science and the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) residential theme program also aim to support and encourage young female undergraduates to pursue careers in the STEM fields.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Without these programs, it would take a very certain kind of woman to care and pursue her goals,&rdquo; said Alexis Seymour, a junior bioengineering major and a resident adviser for the WISE program. &ldquo;Not everyone feels fantastic about themselves, and they need to have that role model to see that someone has done it before.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.dailycal.org/2012/09/23/uc-berkeley-adopts-mentorship-program-for-women-in-stem-majors/\">http://www.dailycal.org/2012/09/23/uc-berkeley-adopts-mentorship-program-for-women-in-stem-majors/</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">NASA Selects Teachers To Fly Student Experiments In Reduced Gravity Aircraft<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Teachers from six NASA Explorer Schools (NES) have been selected to receive the 2012 School Recognition Award for their contributions to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The teachers selected are from Woodrow Wilson Middle School, Glendale, Calif.; Franke Park Elementary School, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Mountview Road School, Morris Plains, N.J.; Corpus Christi Catholic School, Chambersburg, Pa.; Fairport High School, Fairport N.Y.; and Forest Lake Elementary Technology Magnet School, Columbia, S.C.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In April 2013, three teachers from each school will travel to NASA\'s Johnson Space Center in Houston. There they will have the opportunity to fly aboard the agency\'s reduced gravity aircraft and conduct experiments designed by their students. The experiments will examine the acceleration and inertia of objects, how fluids with different viscosities behave in microgravity, and how the absence of gravity affects mass and weight.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Congratulations to the NES teachers selected for this innovative NASA experience. The reduced gravity flights allow teachers to conduct scientific investigations in a microgravity environment, similar to how experiments are conducted on the International Space Station,&quot; said Cecelia Fletcher, acting program manager for primary and secondary education at NASA Headquarters in Washington. &quot;This experiential learning opportunity helps to spread the excitement of STEM education with teachers and students throughout the NASA Explorer School network.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A team of NASA personnel reviewed many applications before selecting these six schools for their exemplary classroom practices and innovative uses of NES resources to engage a broad school population. These schools were chosen from more than 470 schools that are registered participants in the NASA Explorer Schools project.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The NASA Explorer Schools project is the classroom-based gateway for students in grades 4-12 that focuses on stimulating STEM education using agency content and themes.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">For more information about the Explorer Schools Project, visit:<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><a href=\"http://explorerschools.nasa.gov\">http://explorerschools.nasa.gov</a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">To watch a four-minute video that provides project information and shows previous winners aboard the reduced gravity aircraft, visit:<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><a href=\"http://go.nasa.gov/pjy29I\">http://go.nasa.gov/pjy29I</a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">For more information about NASA\'s education programs, visit:<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><a href=\"http://go.nasa.gov/pjy29I\">http://www.nasa.gov/education</a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.marketwatch.com/story/nasa-selects-teachers-to-fly-student-experiments-in-reduced-gravity-aircraft-2012-09-20\">http://www.marketwatch.com/story/nasa-selects-teachers-to-fly-student-experiments-in-reduced-gravity-aircraft-2012-09-20</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Santa Clara Teachers and Industry Join Forces to Promote STEM Education&nbsp;</span></b>&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Veteran Santa Clara Unified School District teachers Craig Young and Jack Riviere are two of ten Santa Clara teachers who have partnered with Bay Area businesses and universities to work in eight-week summer fellowship programs that, come Fall, will help them inspire their students to pursue the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and math.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME) is a consortium of Bay Area organizations that founded the summer fellowship program in 1985 in partnership with the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California at Berkeley. These organizations believe that teachers are the primary agents to inspire and develop the next generation of scientists and engineers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Thirty-eight organizations are hosting 165 teacher fellows for this 28th summer program.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Our Learning and Development group participates regularly in the IISME intern program,&quot; says Debra Korbel, Silicon Valley Bank technical training manager. &quot;Teachers bring a high level of creativity and thoughtfulness to how they approach learning.&nbsp;We benefit from their fresh perspective as well as their finely-tuned skill level.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;IISME does a wonderful job of helping match teacher skills and interests with corporate needs. Their respect and appreciation for teachers makes working with them a joy,&quot; says Jack Riviere, a Cabrillo Middle School teacher for eleven years.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Riviere&rsquo;s background in online teaching and learning is a good fit for helping to implement Silicon Valley Bank&rsquo;s new HR system. He credits his positive experience with Silicon Valley Bank and IISME staff, for making &quot;a summer spent &lsquo;working&rsquo; surprisingly refreshing.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Craig Young, who has taught physics at Wilcox High School for five years, has a second fellowship in the field of nanotechnology (sometimes called molecular manufacturing) at Stanford University.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;I bring an education perspective to the fellowship.&nbsp;The researchers at Stanford are very interested in how to communicate their work to a larger audience, especially younger students.&nbsp; They very much want to help develop the pipeline of students interested in pursuing science and engineering degrees. I help the researchers translate their often very complicated and specific work into language and images that will be effective with the general public and teenagers,&quot; says Young.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">IISME&rsquo;s Education Transfer Plan helps teachers link their summer work experiences to their teaching.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;I will be able to use my greater proficiency with Adobe Captivate to create more engaging and effective online lessons,&quot; says Riviere. &quot;My students will appreciate hearing how a local company has been able to combine technical and pedagogical excellence with high employee morale. Students like to hear about what technical and soft skills will help them be successful in the working world.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Many teachers look for ways to supplement their incomes during the summer.&nbsp;IISME fellowships provide a generous stipend while offering a chance to do interesting, challenging work that can provide a new perspective for classroom teaching,&quot; says Young, one of 25 teachers at Stanford for the summer.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;We\'re lucky to have the program available in this area and such a wide variety of academic and corporate research labs willing to participate.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Since 1985, IISME has awarded 3,135 Summer Fellowships to K-16 teachers from 672 schools and 123 districts, primarily in the Bay Area.&nbsp;For information, visit <a href=\"http://www.iisme.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">www.iisme.org</span></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.santaclaraweekly.com/2012/Issue-32/santa_clara_teachers_and_industry_join_forces_to_promote_stem_education.html\">http://www.santaclaraweekly.com/2012/Issue-32/santa_clara_teachers_and_industry_join_forces_to_promote_stem_education.html</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-right:30.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n17.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial;color:#171717\">The Evolution of Ed Tech in Silicon Valley<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">Over the past few years, every new day has seemed to bring news of another higher-education technology start-up company promising to change the world. According to the National Venture Capital Association, investment in education technology jumped from $100-million in 2007 to nearly $400-million last year. On Easter weekend earlier this year, I flew to Silicon Valley to find out what was going on. The result was a long article in <i>Washington Monthly, </i>called &ldquo;The Siege of Academe.&rdquo; (You can read it <a href=\"http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/septemberoctober_2012/features/_its_three_oclock_in039373.php?page=all\"><span style=\"color:#004377;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">here</span></a>.)<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">I had known some of the reasons for the start-up boom before arriving in California. The world has changed since the first wave of ed-tech start-ups went belly-up in the dot-com bust. Educational tools have become more sophisticated; computing power is cheaper; broadband access and mobile technology have spread.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">What I didn&rsquo;t really understand, until I got there, was how the economics of technology start-ups have also changed.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">The company that best embodied the new dynamics of investment was called Imagine K-12. It&rsquo;s a copy (in valley-speak, a &ldquo;fast follow&rdquo;) of a start-up incubation model developed by a firm called Y Combinator, except Imagine K-12 focuses specifically on education. The model works like this: Say you have an idea for a start-up but no idea what to do next. Imagine K-12 brings you in for three months, gives you a chair and table on which to put your MacBook Air, and teaches you the basics&mdash;how to build a prototype, craft a business plan, and hone a pitch. They help get the product in front of users for feedback and improvement, and introduce people to angel investors, venture capitalists, and other members of the start-up ecosystem. In exchange, Imagine K-12 gets between 4 and 8 percent equity in the company.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">In the old days (that is, 10 years ago), huge and well-capitalized venture-capital firms would simply load a bunch of money into their companies and light a fuse. As the companies tried to generate enough rapid growth to get to an IPO (where, presumably, everyone gets rich) many would flame out. The process put enormous stress on the start-ups, many of which ended up blowing apart on the launching pad. A few big hits would leave the VC&rsquo;s in the black, but over time people realized that the process could be improved with a more sophisticated manipulation of financial fuel.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">At the Imagine K-12 / Y Combinator levels, the initial amounts of money are small, in the range of $25,000 to $50,000. Imagine K-12&rsquo;s president explained to me that the cost of starting a new company is 10 times less than it used to be. That means investors can spread their money around to more entrepreneurs and ideas. Also, the entrepreneurs themselves can &ldquo;fail faster,&rdquo; which is crucial in an ecosystem driven by constant iteration in search of the next great breakout product.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">The &ldquo;fail faster&rdquo; dynamic has certainly borne itself out. A couple of days ago Twitter <a href=\"https://twitter.com/davisshaver/status/240431489953714176\"><span style=\"color:#004377;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">informed</span></a>&nbsp;me that OneSchool, the founders of which make a cameo appearance early in my piece, has already &ldquo;imploded.&rdquo; Parker Holcumb, by contrast, whom I described unsuccessfully pitching his mobile app to a venture capitalist, has forged ahead and is now selling his electronic highlighter on iTunes.&nbsp;Doubtless, companies that didn&rsquo;t even exist in April have already been dreamed up, funded, and passed their prime, while others have already garnered legions of followers and are well on their way to making people rich.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">What I don&rsquo;t think will change are the underlying economic and cultural forces driving the larger trend. It&rsquo;s not just that the tools, money, and opportunity are there for the taking. It&rsquo;s also that people living in Silicon Valley are of the mind-set that the education industry is ripe for disruption.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">Late in the trip, my guide Michael Staton and I met two men in their 60s at a Greek restaurant in the Financial District. It was the first time we had ventured north of Market Street, into the world of tall buildings and suits. The two men were Stewart Alsop and Tom Kalinske. Alsop was a technology journalist for a number of years before turning to investing. Kalinske ran Sega back when Sega Genesis was the coolest video game console you could buy. Then he went into business with Michael Milken and helped found Knowledge Universe and the popular educational-toy manufacturer, LeapFrog.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">Kalinske told me a story about a long time ago, in the 1990s, when Michael Milken was having pretty much exactly the same idea that Silicon Valley people are having now: There are great college professors out there, so why can&rsquo;t we just videotape their lectures, sell them to people, cut the middlemen colleges out of the deal, and be the middlemen ourselves? They identified Nobel Prize-winning college professors because they are, of course, the best. They sent video teams to the professors and, because this kind of thing that used to cost a lot more money to produce (what with film cameras and so forth), they&rsquo;d sunk $20-million into the project before realizing that most Nobel Prize winners are by and large really terrible lecturers and that nobody is going to want to pay money to watch them drone on for hours at time. Luckily, they got Thomson publishing to buy the business for $20-million so nobody took a bath, at least on their end. It was a close call.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">Then Alsop told his story about education and the Valley. Back in the 80s, he says, he tried to set up a foundation to help education with technology. He went to the meetings where curricula were set and talked to the people who made decisions about education. He came away disappointed and cynical. The system struck him as calcified and absurd. Nothing has happened in the years since to change his mind about that.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:14.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">That&rsquo;s pretty much the way people in Silicon Valley see it, which in and of itself doesn&rsquo;t distinguish them from lots of people everywhere; there is a long tradition in this country of dissatisfaction with our public K-12 education system, along with a much more recent (but growing) movement, led by the likes of Peter Thiel, of dissatisfaction with higher education. The difference is that (and that they, themselves, could make that happen, and reap untold riches in the process). By combining almost unlimited access to capital with the greatest software engineers in the world, they believe they are increasingly able to give prospective students what they want, when they want, in an instant, for free. How and when those forces reach higher education will be one of the fascinating dramas of our time.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><i><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:14.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Georgia\">Kevin Carey is director of the education-policy program at the New America Foundation.\'</span></i></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;tab-stops:11.0pt .5in;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2012/09/18/the-evolution-of-ed-tech-in-silicon-valley/\">http://chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2012/09/18/the-evolution-of-ed-tech-in-silicon-valley/</a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Class2Go: Stanford&rsquo;s New Open-Source Platform For Online&nbsp;Education<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The cost of higher education in the U.S. today is ridiculous. Student debt shot <a href=\"http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504343_162-57409131/could-$1t-student-loan-debt-derail-u.s-recovery/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">north of $1 trillion</span></b></a> earlier this year, for example. It&rsquo;s not surprising, then, that the adoption of web and mobile learning tools is skyrocketing, toppling old modes of learning and creating new ones.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">There is no better, more relevant example than &ldquo;MOOCs,&rdquo; otherwise known as &ldquo;massive online open courses.&rdquo; The buzz around these platforms (think Khan Academy, Coursera) is creating a stir in higher education, as they&rsquo;ve come to represent a new model of online learning (change) and the promise of quality, affordable education at scale &mdash; something that just wasn&rsquo;t possible five years ago.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As always, when there&rsquo;s change, something new, there&rsquo;s also plenty of hype, and uncertainty. No one is really sure whether MOOCs are the future higher education, or whether they&rsquo;re simply in a period of being over-hyped, before inevitably settling into a supporting role &mdash; offering certificates or flair rather than diplomas. But right now, that doesn&rsquo;t matter.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The experimentation at this early stage is what&rsquo;s important, as we try to figure out which subjects and learning styles are best suited to their platforms. To their credit, in spite of the uncertainty and their reputation for being intransigent, institutions of higher ed have begun to support and even develop their own MOOC platforms (like <a href=\"http://techcrunch.com/tag/edx/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">MIT, Harvard and UC Berkeley&rsquo;s joint venture, EdX</span></b></a>). But when it comes to actively participating in educational innovation &mdash; or at least MOOCs &mdash; it seems that few can hold a candle to Stanford.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Again, while Stanford is one of many universities getting on board, the university has long offered courses and lectures online, more recently through iTunes U, and at the end of August, went so far as to create a <a href=\"http://techcrunch.com/2012/08/30/stanford-creates-vice-provost-for-online-learning-to-fundamentally-reshape-education/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">&ldquo;Vice Provost of Online Learning&rdquo;</span></b></a> to oversee the integration of web technologies into Stanford&rsquo;s education. What&rsquo;s more, popular educational platforms like <a href=\"http://techcrunch.com/2012/04/18/coursera-raises-16m/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">the well-funded Coursera</span></b></a>, the tech-focused, Khan Academy-inspired Udacity and the group-based <a href=\"http://venturelab.stanford.edu/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Venture Lab</span></b></a> all either got their start at Stanford or are currently on campus.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">And, as of this month, Stanford has added yet another MOOC. While that may seem superfluous, <a href=\"http://class2go.stanford.edu/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">Class2Go</span></b></a> is no clone &mdash; it&rsquo;s bringing a unique approach to its online learning platform. Created by eight engineers in Stanford&rsquo;s CS Department, the not-for-profit service has been designed from the bottom up both for teaching and research, with a focus on portability and interoperability.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">To unpack that a little: When Class2Go says it&rsquo;s portable, it means that it wants to be platform agnostic. Its documents are already portable, its videos already live outside its system on YouTube, its assets can be repurposed as professors see fit and the platform&rsquo;s exercises and problem sets are in the Khan Academy format (meaning they&rsquo;re not in a proprietary database) and can be used anywhere.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In terms of interoperability, Class2Go&rsquo;s website reads, &ldquo;we don&rsquo;t want to build or maintain more than we have to,&rdquo; so it stands on the shoulders of, or relies significantly on, other services to run, like Khan, Piazza, YouTube, Python Django, Amazon AWS, Opscode and Github. Furthermore, designing the platform for both teaching and research means that the platform will leverage data to inform and evolve pedagogy, as well as to give them a glimpse into the efficacy of lessons, teaching style, tech tools, etc.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">But the biggest differentiating factor for Class2Go &mdash; in case it hasn&rsquo;t yet become apparent &mdash; is its early dedication to building and maintaining a totally open-source platform. This means that the platform aims to be both free of cost and of pricey IP, while professors are free to contribute to Class2Go&rsquo;s code and get involved in the development of the platform, as well as to collaborate with other institutions and organizations.<a href=\"http://tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/screen-shot-2012-09-17-at-9-36-12-pm.png\"><span style=\"color:windowtext;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\"><o:p></o:p></span></a></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">And that&rsquo;s where you start to see what might be Class2Go&rsquo;s biggest appeal. A big complaint against existing platforms (and really, educational technology as a whole) is that it is more concerned with progress for the sake of progress &mdash; even if that means technology replacing teachers (the human kind) altogether.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Instead, the most successful edtech platforms (and this is obviously especially true for MOOCs, given their structure) are those who truly empower teachers, designing their platforms in such a way as to optimize a teacher&rsquo;s ability to teach effectively, control their content &mdash; and engage their students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The platform does this by making all content created within, regardless of type, property of whoever creates it. Professors can also take advantage of the aforementioned backend, which enables them to track student use, see how students are watching video, when they drop out and what kind of content resonates with them the most, video or slideshows &mdash; essentially creating an A/B testing platform for teachers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">For students, the long-term goal is obviously to offer a wide variety of courses and learning experiences. However, the platform is still early in its development (after all, it came together over the course of three months) and hopefully continues to be experimental. Stanford will offer 16 MOOC courses in the fall, two of which will be on Class2Go. The platform&rsquo;s classes go live on October 8th and include: <a href=\"https://class.stanford.edu/networking/Fall2012/preview/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">&ldquo;An Introduction To Computer Networks&rdquo;</span></b></a> and <a href=\"https://class.stanford.edu/solar/Fall2012/preview/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">&ldquo;Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, &amp; Batteries.&rdquo;</span></b></a><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The other differentiating (and life-saving) factor for Class2Go is that it&rsquo;s being supported by the university. Compare that to Coursera, which was lucky enough to raise a huge first round for such a young company, but still has to eventually face &ldquo;Monetization Mountain.&rdquo; Business models seem to have been the farthest things from mind during the development of Class2Go, and, thanks to Stanford&rsquo;s support, the team can focus on building a great user experience for professors and students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Education and monetization have always enjoyed a strained relationship, and is an ever-present pressure over the oft-mission-based edtech startup. So, hopefully, being free from that will allow Class2Go to experiment in ways others may not be able to, and by becoming open source, build a platform that in the end will have greater integrity and more bells and whistles than its closed counterparts. Hopefully, Class2Go (which, by the way, is also working on mobile apps, hence the name) and the other MOOCs in its class will soon be able to move beyond the experimental phase to really begin solving the big </span><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://techcrunch.com/2012/09/17/class2go-stanfords-new-open-source-platform-for-online-education/\">http://techcrunch.com/2012/09/17/class2go-stanfords-new-open-source-platform-for-online-education/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n20.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Pamela Clute to deliver keynote at STEP Conference<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">RIVERSIDE, Calif. (<a href=\"http://www.ucr.edu\" title=\"www.ucr.edu\">www.ucr.edu</a>) &mdash; American industry is begging for employees with strong skills in science, technology, engineering and math, yet 70 percent of U.S. students who enter college with the intent to major in those STEM fields drop out of school or switch majors within four years according to a 2008 CPEC study. That&rsquo;s why this year&rsquo;s Science Technology Education Partnership (STEP) Conference is focusing on young students and their teachers, to try to turn those numbers around.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The STEP Conference is set for Oct. 2-3 at Bourns Technology Center at 1200 Columbia in Riverside, which also houses UC Riverside&rsquo;s College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT). More than 250 high school students from around Riverside County will get the chance for explore six CE-CERT labs from 1 to 4 p.m. on Oct. 2, learning about research on solar panels, synthetic fuels, atmospheric processes, emissions testing, alternative fuels and ways to create more energy efficient transportation.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC Riverside and other sponsors provide creative learning opportunities at the conference, especially for Riverside County students and teachers in grades 4-8. The goal is more than just igniting their interest in STEM subjects, said Pamela Clute, a UCR math professor who is also Assistant Vice Chancellor of Educational and Community Engagement and Executive Director of UCR&rsquo;s ALPHA Center.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Clute, the keynote speaker for the K-12 teacher conference from 3:45 to 6 p.m. on Oct. 3, wants teachers to help their students understand that mastering subjects like algebra I, algebra II and geometry today will open the door to interesting and lucrative STEM careers in the future.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;In the United States, only 33% of college students get a STEM degree, compared to 75% of the college students in China,&rdquo; said Clute. &ldquo;In China, the expectations from family, society and the media are that students should excel in STEM subjects, because they understand that doing well in those areas will improve their quality of life and the economic vitality of their country. In the U.S., students think entertainment and sports are the only ways to make it big.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The 2011-2012 PayScale College Salary Report makes that point plain. The top 10 college majors that lead to high salaries are all STEM subjects&mdash;petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, aerospace engineering, computer engineering, physics, applied mathematics, computer science and nuclear engineering.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Often you hear people ask, &lsquo;How is algebra relevant to my life?&rsquo; and I love explaining why,&rdquo; Clute said. &ldquo;The satellite that brings reception to your cell phone is often in the shape of a tetrahedron.&nbsp; This is geometry in action. Your cell phone is a mini computer. It receives all the signals sent to all cell phones in a particular service region. Yet because of signal coding systems, your cell phone only responds to the signals sent to you. This is algebra in action!<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We have to make math more informative by providing the tools and the ideas for enhancing instruction and helping teachers enrich their curriculum. Providing excitement about mathematics at an early age can help kids get over intimidating factors along the way.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The teacher conference will offer dinner and many hands-on activities. Clute said she wants teachers to leave with lots of stimulating ideas for teaching math and science, &ldquo;along with a validation that what they do matters and is important work.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><span style=\"mso-spacerun:\nyes\">&nbsp;</span>&ldquo;The instruction has to be relevant,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;I pick something in society, like a cell phone, for instance, and then I talk about the satellites that give us cell phone reception and the importance of the shape of those satellites&hellip;.that&rsquo;s all math, and the equations used to design those satellites; that&rsquo;s algebra.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Students from all over Riverside County will be visiting the conference to see ways that math and science are applied to research and products. Transportation and other support is being provided by the STEP Conference Board, Bourns Inc., the Riverside County Office of Education and the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce, as well as CE-CERT and UC Riverside&rsquo;s ALPHA Center, which works with educators to help them become passionate, enthusiastic teachers of math and science.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I&rsquo;m a strong believer in making school something wonderful that makes kids want to learn,&rdquo; Clute said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re teaching math like we taught it 2,500 years ago. We need to make a change to make it more relevant and exciting to kids, and more pertinent to this 21</span><sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:15.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">st</span></sup><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> century global economy. If we don&rsquo;t do this our students will face an extreme competitive disadvantage and our economic vitality, which depends on quality STEM education, will suffer.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/8850\">http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/8850</a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Top U.S. educator touts technology<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">REDWOOD CITY -- U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan got his show on the road here Wednesday, hyping the promise of technology to transform education as he embarked on a series of back-to-school pep talks across the country.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In two days in Silicon Valley, Duncan displayed the enthusiasm for change that has marked his 3&frac12; years as educator-in-chief and defended the Obama Administration\'s relentless push for higher standards and achievement, better teaching, education equity and now, technology in the classroom.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Our challenge is to make great education the norm,&quot; he told an auditorium full of students, teachers and community leaders at Sequoia High School. He lauded the progress at the school, where 51 percent of the students come from poor families and 25 percent are undocumented immigrants, yet 68 percent of juniors and seniors take at least one honor course and nearly all graduates continue to some kind of colleges, according to Principal Bonnie Hansen.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Duncan touted the federal Dream Act, which would allow undocumented students to enroll in college, join the military or legally work. &quot;We can\'t afford to keep that talent on the sidelines,&quot; he said to applause.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In pushing the promise of technology, Duncan and others stressed that digital innovation is not about replacing teachers. Equipping &quot;great teachers with great tools is going to save education,&quot; said Catlin Tucker, an English teacher from Windsor High in Sonoma County, who encourages her students to use smartphones for classroom work.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">On Tuesday, spending a day at Stanford University with high-tech leaders, Duncan said that education technology pioneers are helping to change the world. Among them are Sal Khan, whose online Khan Academy posts free videos on everything from addition to art history that are used in 15,000 classrooms. Khan, appearing with Duncan at Sequoia on Wednesday, said his goal is &quot;to teach 100 million students in the next five years.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Likewise, Stanford professor Andrew Ng has founded a firm, Coursera, offering free, online interactive courses taught by professors at some of the nation\'s most selective universities. On Wednesday he spoke of an institution where a four-year education costs more than $200,000 and is offering classes for free.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Duncan appeared with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, who touted the commission\'s &quot;Conect2Compete&quot; initiative that aims to offer low-income families with schoolchildren broadband service for $10 a month. The program is expected to start nationwide by January, FCC spokesman Neil Grace said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The messages about expanding educational access resonated with students. &quot;I liked it,&quot; said Sequoia senior Juan Valdez, 17, referring to increased online courses. &quot;It\'s going to be really hard to get money for a four-year college.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">But the applause for Duncan and his panelists didn\'t compare with students\' rapt attention and cheers for a student-produced music video and for a clip of Printz Board of the Black Eyed Peas, who helped with production.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Duncan took questions from the audience via Twitter, and said afterward that he sends his own tweets (he has 53,000 followers). &quot;It\'s a great way to get feedback,&quot; he said, and to reach young people.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">While his talk Wednesday promoted the promise of technology, on Tuesday evening Duncan touched on the federal agenda for change.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">He stressed the importance of preschool. &quot;The only way we can stop playing catchup in education is if our babies enter kindergarten ready to learn.&quot; And he touted the administration\'s record of school reform, enticing nearly all states to embrace tougher standards and better performance.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">He sees teacher training, support, compensation and retention as areas ripe for reform. &quot;The entire teacher pipeline is fundamentally broken,&quot; he said. While in high-performing countries like Singapore and Finland, the top 10 percent of college graduates are recruited for teaching; in the United States, two-thirds of the teachers come from the bottom third of their class.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Ironically, from the man who has perhaps prodded more change than any education secretary before him, Duncan echoed a criticism often voiced by teachers. Reform, he said, &quot;is way too top down.&quot; Administrators should ask teachers what they need to teach better, he said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;\nmso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">But, he said, he wants to encourage demand from parents for more educational change. &quot;The biggest critique is we are going too fast. Actually, we are going far, far too slow.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.mercurynews.com/education/ci_21528594/top-u-s-educator-touts-technology\">http://www.mercurynews.com/education/ci_21528594/top-u-s-educator-touts-technology</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC SAN DIEGO ENGINEERING SCHOOL ADDING HUGE NEW FACILITY<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">UC San Diego&rsquo;s already large Jacobs School of Engineering will become even bigger Friday with the opening of an $83 million center whose researchers work in areas ranging from aircraft design to the testing of medical devices, the 3-D printing of blood vessels and creation of all manner of artwork.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The 183,000-square-foot Structural and Materials Engineering (SME) building becomes the third-largest research facility at Jacobs, a nationally ranked engineering school whose enrollment increased by 1,000 students in just the past two years. The center, built almost entirely with public money, is loosely designed after Bauhaus, a German university famous for blending science, engineering and the arts.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We need this building because we&rsquo;re still in growth mode,&rdquo; said Freider Seible, the engineering school&rsquo;s dean and a structural engineer whose research focuses on bridge design. &ldquo;In difficult economic times, more students enroll in engineering because there&rsquo;s still the possibility of a well-paying job at the end of four years.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;And we are bringing together four seemingly disparate disciplines in one place. It will be interesting to see what comes out of that.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Those disciplines are structural engineering, materials and nanoengineering, medical device research, as well as the visual arts, which broadly includes drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, video and the computer arts.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;I am hopeful that people from the visual arts will help stir the imagination,&rdquo; Seible said. &ldquo;Engineering can be nerdy. This could make people more outgoing, creative and imaginative.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/sep/10/tp-engineering-school-adding-huge-new-facility/\">http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/sep/10/tp-engineering-school-adding-huge-new-facility/</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">GameDesk Opens New Game-Based School<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">GameDesk, <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">an organization</span></b></a> that&rsquo;s developing a variety of game-based learning initiatives, is venturing into new terrain with the opening of a new school and the development of new digital tools, with millions of dollars in funding from both the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and AT&amp;T.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/playmaker-school/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">PlayMaker School</span></b></a>, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, will open in Los Angeles on September 7, with 60 students in 6th grade, and will operate as a &ldquo;school within a school&rdquo; at <a href=\"http://www.newroads.org/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">New Roads</span></b></a>, an independent middle school.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Like <a href=\"http://www.q2l.org/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Quest to Learn</span></b></a>, the game-based school in New York, PlayMaker will incorporate principles of game-based learning into the entire instructional model, but with an additional focus on making and discovering. The goal is to engage students in both high-tech and low-tech games and modular, instructional activities. Individual students will work with an &ldquo;Adventure Map&rdquo; that will guide them to choose their own path, allowing for students to control how they learn and when they learn it. These modules will be not only individual tasks, but will also include group work. In a unit on kinetic and potential energy, for example, students will watch videos, play games, create digital roller-coasters, and create real-life models.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">With ongoing formative assessments tied not only to the Common Core, but also practical digital skills, collaboration, critical thinking, and <a href=\"http://casel.org/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">social emotion learning principles,</span></b></a> the focus is meant to go beyond traditional schooling goals. Instruction will focus on providing context for the content, whereby students understand the relevance of what they&rsquo;re learning. Teachers will play the roles of questioners, facilitators, and reflective agents.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">More information will soon be released about the specifics of the program.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">SCALING UP</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Lucien Vattel, the executive director of GameDesk, said he wants to scale the company&rsquo;s tools and learning models to schools and other groups across the country. To that end, the company <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/gamedesk-collaborates-with-att-to-build-a-new-learning-center-and-national-digital-learning-platform/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">received $3.8 million from AT&amp;T</span></b></a> to fund two new initiatives: a learning laboratory called Learning Center, which will include a &ldquo;classroom of the future&rdquo; where new digital tools will be developed, tested, evaluated, and aligned with academic standards; and free access to an online portal of digital learning content, as well as support for teachers to learn how to integrate it.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We see this as being a clearing house for all the best work in this space and we want the entire education community to contribute content to the site, from the professional developer, to the educator in Kansas, to the creative and tenacious parents and kids at home,&rdquo; Vattel said.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">As part of the professional development for the PlayMaker School, GameDesk also initiated a collaborative called <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/projects/dreamlab/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">DreamLab</span></b></a> focused on not only creating many of the GameDesk&rsquo;s projects, but also how to implement and sustain them. Instead of simply creating and implementing, however, they design in collaboration with student and teachers, to ensure that real needs are being met well.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Although still in its infancy as a component of GameDesk&rsquo;s work, DreamLab hopes to provide professional development for teachers on site. In addition, they hope to build a portal where teachers can collaborate on lesson design and share their ideas for implementing the games in the classroom. In the past months as they prepared for the new school opening, new teachers received intensive professional development, learned to design games, played games, and understood the pedagogical principles around using games for learning.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">GAMES IN STEM</span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">GameDesk</span></b></a> is also <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/projects/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">creating and collaborating on games</span></b></a> that target the Common Core standards. <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/projects/on-site-school-pilots/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Mathmaker</span></b></a>, which GameDesk created, is focused on having students take on the roles of engineers to learn math concepts. This game, as well as others, is directed at amplifying STEM curriculum, and is being piloting and used in large urban high schools.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">GameDesk also uses another math-focused game called <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/projects/motion-math-in-class/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Motion Math In-Class</span></b></a>, created by the team at Stanford University Learning, Design and Technology Program, which is part of its math curriculum. This interactive iPad app<a href=\"http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/04/dont-forget-the-fun-factor-in-educational-games/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\"> helps students learn fractions, proportions and percentages</span></b></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Another unique game is <a href=\"http://www.gamedesk.org/projects/dojo/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Dojo</span></b></a>, which uses play and biometrics to work on emotion regulation (not to be confused with <a href=\"http://www.classdojo.com/\"><b><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">Class Dojo</span></b></a>, which helps teachers with classroom management). So far, it has been used successfully with diverse populations and even youth within or exiting the juvenile justice system. Players experience real-life challenges that test their emotions, but also gives them strategies and feedback on how to overcome these challenges.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/09/a-new-game-based-school-opens/\">http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/09/a-new-game-based-school-opens/</a></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\">&nbsp;</p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chevron\'s Fuel Your School Program Expands to Support Nine Communities Across the U.S.<o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chevron U.S.A. Inc. announced the expansion of its Fuel Your School program to nine communities this fall from two communities in 2011. Fuel Your School will provide useful funding for eligible classroom projects developed by public school teachers and posted to DonorsChoose.org in the following communities:<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Alameda and Contra Costa counties, California<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Orange County, California<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Kern County, California<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Sacramento County, California<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- St. Tammany, Orleans and Plaquemines parishes, Louisiana<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Jackson County, Mississippi<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Multnomah County, Oregon<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Harris County, Texas<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">-- Salt Lake and Davis counties, Utah<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chevron will donate $1 for every eight gallon or larger fill up from Oct. 1 to Oct. 31 at participating Chevron and Texaco stations in those communities, up to a total contribution of nearly $5 million.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Educating today\'s students remains critical to our country\'s future, but America\'s schools face significant challenges and have fallen behind in science, technology, engineering and math,&quot; said Dale Walsh, president of Chevron Americas Products. &quot;Fuel Your School provides teachers with essential tools and resources that help students learn, explore and get excited about STEM education to help prepare them for the jobs of tomorrow.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The program is an innovative collaboration with DonorsChoose.org, an online charity to help students in need. All year, public school teachers across the U.S. post classroom project requests on DonorsChoose.org, ranging from pencils to microscope slides and even live tarantulas for use with biology lessons.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;Teachers spend more than $350 of their own money every year on materials for their students,&quot; said Charles Best, CEO of DonorsChoose.org. &quot;Our site enables public school teachers to post projects for funding from their community and companies like Chevron who want to improve students\' education.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The lack of adequate school funding across the nation has become so dire that some teachers do not have basic supplies to help students complete their classroom assignments. During the last school year, public school teachers shared more than 100,000 requests on the DonorsChoose.org website. One of those requests came from Ms. Lim-Breitbart, who teaches high school physics at Aspire California College Preparatory Academy in Berkeley, Calif., but lacked the resources to provide students with hands-on scientific activities. With the help of the Fuel Your School program, she and her students received digital thermometers and hot plates to use during physics lessons.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&quot;[The] donation helped change our classroom from \'getting by\' to \'doing real science\' this year,&quot; said Lim-Breitbart. Students now believe that &quot;science is a real option for them in the future.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Chevron partners with local communities, governments and non-profit organizations to increase learning opportunities for students and support the social and economic vitality of communities where the company has significant business operations. Chevron has contributed nearly $100 million for education in the U.S. over the past three years.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Since its inception in 2010, Fuel Your School has funded more than 3,000 classroom projects at nearly 600 schools, and the program has grown each year to support students in additional communities. Public school teachers and other educators are invited to post eligible projects starting on September 1 to <a href=\"http://www.DonorsChoose.org\">www.DonorsChoose.org</a>, for possible funding as part of the Fuel Your School program.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Consumers can track the classroom projects in need of funding and see how much money is being earned for public schools in each city by visiting <a href=\"http://www.FuelYourSchool.com\">www.FuelYourSchool.com</a>. Donations earned through Fuel Your School will be used to fund eligible classroom projects from Oct. 2 through Nov. 30, 2012, or until funds generated by this program have been exhausted by eligible projects. Consumers and Chevron employees may also independently fund classroom projects on the <a href=\"http://DonorsChoose.org\">DonorsChoose.org</a> website by making separate, individual donations.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.marketwatch.com/story/chevrons-fuel-your-school-program-expands-to-support-nine-communities-across-the-us-2012-09-05?siteid=nbkh\">http://www.marketwatch.com/story/chevrons-fuel-your-school-program-expands-to-support-nine-communities-across-the-us-2012-09-05?siteid=nbkh&nbsp;</a></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 16pt; \">\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 16pt; \"><b style=\"line-height: 29pt; \"> <hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;\">Nvidia, Agilent and other Silicon Valley tech companies boost STEM education through teacher internships</span></b></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">I\'ve heard it over and over, since I started asking what it takes to get kids, particularly kids living challenging lives, to embrace science, math, engineering and technology:</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Get science, math and the rest of it in front of them. Show kids what the disciplines can do when unleashed in the real world.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Brittany Wenger, the Florida high school kid who won <a href=\"http://www.siliconvalley.com/topics?Google%20Inc.\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Google\'s</span></a> (<a href=\"http://markets.financialcontent.com/mng-ba.siliconvalley/quote?Symbol=GOOG\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">GOOG</span></a>) recent global science fair, started this particular meme for me when I talked to her after her big victory. &quot;If kids are exposed, they\'re more likely to find their true passion,&quot; Wenger says, &quot;to be able to do whatever they want with science, rather than being forced into it.&quot;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">In other words: Show. Don\'t tell.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">And so wouldn\'t it make sense to better arm teachers with the experiences they need to show kids how science, technology, engineering and math are used in every day life? An obscure Silicon Valley outfit called Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education, thinks so. For 28 years, the Santa Clara nonprofit, better known as IISME, has been pairing teachers with universities and tech companies in the valley to give teachers a chance to see how principles and ideas they teach in the classroom are translated into real world products and initiatives.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The teachers typically spend eight weeks of their summers working for a local company (the program recently expanded modestly in Southern California) and the company pays them and kicks into a fund that provides teachers with $1,000 grants to launch new STEM lesson plan at their schools.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">This summer 165 teachers are interning at 38 companies or schools. And yes, says Jennifer Bruckner, the program\'s executive director, the project does strive to reach teachers who teach kids facing challenges. For instance, she says, more than a third of the program\'s teachers work at schools that are struggling academically or serve poor neighborhoods. She only wishes IISME could do more. It turned away 300 teachers this year, for lack of industry slots.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">&quot;Our biggest restriction is needing more organizations to come on board,&quot; she says.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">Andrea Hutchison, who teaches at Milpitas High School\'s Digital Business Academy, is one of the lucky ones. She landed a spot this summer at Nvidia, researching the different ways the graphics chipmaker\'s customers use its speedy processors. The work has opened her eyes to the processors\' applications in heart surgery, air traffic control, military surveillance, facial recognition and more.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">&quot;That\'s kind of my goal,&quot; Hutchison says, &quot;to take this back to my classroom. I want to show them what I\'ve learned, how the technology is used in all different areas.&quot;</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">Hutchison says shifting gears to a different kind of work is invigorating. Ideas bubble up from conversations and from looking at the world in a different way. &quot;I feel like when I go back into the classroom, I\'m going to be more motivated,&quot; she says.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">It\'s like planting a seed, a science and technology-loving seed that spreads enthusiasm to students. Bruckner says that through the years the summer program has enrolled more than 3,000 teachers from 670 schools. Those teachers, she says, have reached two million students.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">&quot;Kids are really inspired by teachers who have experienced the practical applications and who have worked side-by-side with scientists and engineers who can give them authentic stories,&quot; Bruckner says.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">David Hall, a chemistry and forensic science teacher at Sacred Heart Preparatory in Atherton, has been collecting his authentic stories at Agilent, where he is working in the molecular detection lab.</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">&quot;I\'m very happy to go into the classroom and share my experiences with students,&quot; Hall says. &quot;I can tell them that I\'ve been doing something really cool.&quot;</span></div>\n<div>&nbsp;</div>\n<div><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">And lest you think IISME interns get stuck with busy work, it so happens that Hall is working on a product in development that neither he nor his mentor, Carl Myerholtz, can say too much about. Hall will say that his work will lead to a three-day lesson plan covering liquid solutions and chromatography and work with a mass spectrometer.</span></div>\n<div>&nbsp;</div>\n</b><b style=\"line-height: 29pt; \">\n<div><span style=\"line-height:\n150%;\">My guess? Some kid at Sacred Heart is going to hear &quot;mass spectrometer&quot; for the first time. And after that, it will be a thought that she simply won\'t be able to get out of her head.</span></div>\n</b><b style=\"line-height: 29pt; \">\n<div style=\"line-height:150%\">&nbsp;</div>\n</b></div>\n</div>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.mercurynews.com/mike-cassidy/ci_21273923/cassidy-nvidia-agilent-stem-education-internships-tech\">http://www.mercurynews.com/mike-cassidy/ci_21273923/cassidy-nvidia-agilent-stem-education-internships-tech</a></p>\n<hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"font-size:18.0pt;\">Monta Vista, Lynbrook offering new course in STEM education</span></b></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">Students within the Fremont Union High School District wishing to further their studies through independent research can now get school credit for their work.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">The district approved a new independent study course in July that focuses on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">The development of the course was a natural fit for the district, which is home to nationally recognized science research by both teachers and students. Every year, a large group of students enter regional, state and national science competitions.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">Most recently and prominently, Angela Zhang of Monta Vista High School won a $100,000 scholarship for her cancer research in the 2011 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology. Zhang\'s prize-winning research studied the use of nanotechnology to eradicate cancer stem cells.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">The district also sees students do well in the annual Intel Science Talent Search contest. This year there was one semifinalist from Monta Vista and two from Lynbrook High.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">In 2011, Cupertino High School had its first finalist, Chelsea Voss, to go along with four finalists at Lynbrook. In 2010, finalists Raman Nelakanti and David Liu, both Lynbrook High students, went all the way to the talent search finals in Washington, D.C. Liu was awarded second place nationally and won $75,000 for his development of a system that can recognize and search catalog digital images.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-autospace:none\">Because of budget constraints, it would have been impossible to add the STEM course without help from the Fremont Union High School District Foundation, according to Kate Jamentz, academic deputy superintendent.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">The foundation will fund two sections of the course for the 2012-13 school year, one at Monta Vista and one at Lynbrook, where there is already notable student participation and teachers experienced in supporting such projects.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">The foundation also agreed to fund the participation of interested teachers from all FUHSD schools in the IISME Research Collaborative, which aims to support teachers interested in teaching research.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&quot;We have a lot of students, probably more than most districts, go out and do research projects on their own,&quot; Jamentz said. &quot;We will start at those two schools, but we have teachers throughout the district participating in IISME thinking about how to incorporate the course either in classes or science clubs.&quot;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">The new course would ideally target freshman looking to build their researching skills, but the schools will take sophomores in the first year.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">Up to 40 students a year could sign up for the course to learn to design and implement a research project with the support of a mentor. Students would receive 10 elective credits, but the course would not replace any math or science course or fulfill science requirements.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">Although the course will be offered only at Monta Vista and Lynbrook, the district would eventually like to branch out to other schools.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&quot;The real goal is to support inquiry and research in science,&quot; Jamentz said.</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&quot;Right now, we wanted to get it off the ground. We\'ll see how it evolves at each school.&quot;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"line-height:25.0pt;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.mercurynews.com/sunnyvale/ci_21278623/monta-vista-lynbrook-offering-new-course-stem-education\">http://www.mercurynews.com/sunnyvale/ci_21278623/monta-vista-lynbrook-offering-new-course-stem-education&nbsp;</a></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; \">Low-income kids of color SMASH into math and science at Stanford, Berkeley, UCLA,&nbsp;USC</span></b></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"line-height:150%;\"><a href=\"http://www.lpfi.org/smash\"><span style=\"\nline-height:150%;color:#1B0981;font-weight:normal;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">SMASH</span></a></span></b><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">, a program that gives low-income high schoolers of color a chance to study math and science in some of the best-equipped academic institutions in California, recently rolled out a branch at Stanford. I had the chance to visit the intense summer program a few weeks ago, and was very impressed by what founders Freada and Mitch Kapor have put in motion here.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The Kapors, who founded the&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.lpfi.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Level Playing Field Institute</span></a>&nbsp;in 2001, got the inspiration for SMASH&nbsp;at a 2003 fundraiser they attended&nbsp;in Andover, MA, for a program called&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.andover.edu/summersessionoutreach/mathscience/pages/default.aspx\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">(MS)2</span></a>. (MS)2 brought 100 disadvantaged African American, Latino, and Native American students from select public schools across the U.S. to highly elite prep school <a href=\"http://www.andover.edu/Pages/default.aspx\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Phillips Academy</span></a>&nbsp;for the summer. The program, which had changed the lives of hundreds of children, showed the students what they could achieve if they worked hard. Given the program&rsquo;s results, the Kapors didn&rsquo;t hesitate to make a generous donation.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">But when Freada asked how many of the children were from California, she was disappointed, but not surprised, by the answer.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;After a bit of shuffling and staring at shoes,&rdquo; she told me during my visit to the Stanford program in July, &ldquo;I was told &lsquo;none&rsquo; with an explanation that they had longstanding relationships with several high schools but none west of Chicago or Texas.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">California isn&rsquo;t considered a priority given the popular myth that Silicon Valley is a meritocracy &ndash;&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.inc.com/vivek-wadhwa/face-of-success-blacks-in-silicon-valley.html\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">a phenomenon I&rsquo;ve previously highlighted</span></a>. Blacks and Hispanics constitute only&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_14383730\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">1.5 percent and 4.7 percent respectively</span></a>&nbsp;of the Valley&rsquo;s computer workers &mdash; even lower than the national averages of 7.1 percent and 5.3 percent.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:12.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">The Silicon Valley elite &nbsp;rarely get to interact with minorities, so stereotypes get propagated, which only serves to make the problem worse. Venture capitalists invest in people who fit the &ldquo;patterns&rdquo; of successful entrepreneurs that they know, and hiring managers bring in more of the same types of people they have seen achieve success &mdash; in other words: people like them.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Indeed, during the July visit, the Kapors recalled an encounter between Mitch and one of his young Latino colleagues a few years ago. He asked if Mitch invented Lotus 1-2-3 (Mitch founded Lotus Software, and it was&nbsp;<a href=\"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lotus_Software#Diversification_and_acquisition_by_IBM\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">acquired</span></a>&nbsp;by IBM for $3.5 billion in 1995). Mitch said he was puzzled as to how someone in their 20s might know of a software program that was a blockbuster in the 1980s. He explained that his mother cleaned office buildings at night in Sacramento and would sometimes take him to work and let him play on the computer while she cleaned toilets and emptied corporate employees&rsquo; trash cans. For him, he said, this was the symbol of another life &mdash; of being successful. The interaction left Mitch in tears.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;How many Silicon Valley elites have ever had a conversation with the people who clean their offices,&rdquo; he asked me, &ldquo;do they see their kids as having the potential to be top talent in any field?&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">This motivated the Kapors to establish&nbsp;SMASH&nbsp;&mdash; the Summer Math and Science Honors Academy at UC Berkeley. They established SMASH through the&nbsp;Level Playing Field Institute. While inspired by the (MS) 2 program, SMASH is not a replica of it. Instead, SMASH focuses on providing project-based learning and integrating science and math into contemporary issues rather than an intensive curriculum oriented towards standardized tests.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">SMASH provides full funding for high-achieving, low-income high school students of color to spend time on campus for five weeks during the summers after their 9th, 10th, and 11th grade years. They are immersed in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), conduct experiments and participate in group discussions. They are taught by leading scholars and provided access to the most advanced research equipment. Then they are provided with year-round academic support, including SAT prep, college counseling, and other support to ensure their academic success.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The results speak for themselves: 100 percent of SMASH graduates have been accepted to competitive four-year colleges, and the overwhelming majority persist as STEM majors, according to Freada. Kids from under-performing public schools who are eligible for free lunches have often never heard of MIT or Middlebury or Morehouse, but those are campuses now populated with SMASH alumni.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">SMASH has grown since 2004 from one site at UC Berkeley to four sites throughout the state, including the one at Stanford. Another site is opening at the University of Chicago in 2013, and the program&rsquo;s organizers are in discussions with 18 other campuses to expand nationally. The goal? Twenty-five sites by 2020.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The biggest limiting factor is funding. The program is expensive, and the universities &mdash; even those with large endowments, such as Stanford &mdash; still charge the startup nonprofit full price for room and board. It&rsquo;s the single, greatest line item in the SMASH budget.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">SMASH has a rigorous and evolving curriculum, experiments with blended learning, including&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.huffingtonpost.com/meredith-ely/myscihigh-steals-the-show_b_1311931.html\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">MySciHigh</span></a>, which won first place at a recent Startup Weekend. The program also has a detailed operations manual for launching new sites. A STEM teacher training academy is also in its sights as the program explores how to scale its success.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">When I visited SMASH at Stanford in July and talked to many of the participating students. They called the program &ldquo;life-changing&rdquo; and talked about how it made them determined to become an engineer or a scientist.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Maria Castillo, a senior from Richmond High in California said the program inspired her to become an engineer so she could help solve the energy crisis. SMASH, she said, &ldquo;inspired me to speak my opinions no matter what other people think.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Hi Vo, a senior at Del Mar High School in San Jose, gushed about how excited he was about learning math and science because of the great scientists he met at Stanford. Daryle Alums, a student at KIPP King Collegiate in San Lorenzo, Calif., said SMASH got him interested in computer science and that he had started a company with his friends.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">I have little doubt that these students&rsquo; excitement and the sense of hope they developed is infectious. We just need thousands more like them returning to schools around the country to inspire the others.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://venturebeat.com/2012/08/10/low-income-kids-of-color-smash-into-math-and-science-at-stanford-berkeley-ucla-usc/\">http://venturebeat.com/2012/08/10/low-income-kids-of-color-smash-into-math-and-science-at-stanford-berkeley-ucla-usc/</a></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; \">How one California school uses iPads to support its PE programs</span></b></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:12.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">The iPads fill a gap where traditional PE instruction leaves off by ensuring the most accurate assessment of student skills and abilities.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The pressures of being a physical education teacher in today&rsquo;s public school environment are mounting. We&rsquo;re being asked to strike a balance between government physical fitness mandates for America&rsquo;s children and extreme budget cuts. Like many other public schools, we at Eastlake Middle School in Chula Vista, Calif., are struggling to walk that tightrope with fewer and fewer supports and are continuously searching for tools that help us achieve that goal.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">I&rsquo;ve been teaching for 14 years. During that time I&rsquo;ve seen a lot of changes in the average public school&rsquo;s physical education (PE) department. Some schools have kept their programs in place, some have whittled them back significantly, while others have done away with PE programs altogether. At our school, we decided that physical education needs to be supported&mdash;and we decided to embrace new technology tools to help us instill solid physical education and exercise values in our students.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Last year, we rolled out a new iPad-based PE program called <a href=\"http://www.sparkpe.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">SPARK</span></a>. The funding came from a Carol M. White Physical Education Program federal grant, which covered the cost of 40 iPads and a number of program training sessions for 50 instructors from across the district. We centered our grant project around obesity prevention and highlighted the fact that our students&rsquo; body mass index (BMI), aerobic capacity, and fitness scores were lagging behind national levels.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">We started using the iPads in our department in the 2011-12 school year. The &nbsp;SPARK program includes digital lesson plans, activity videos for students, interactive assessment tools, and online grading (which replaces traditional &ldquo;roll call&rdquo;), all stored on the lightweight, portable devices. They are easy to carry around and effectively replace all of the paper, pencils, and grade books that our PE teachers previously had to carry around with them.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The iPads also fill a gap where traditional PE instruction leaves off by ensuring the most accurate assessment of student skills and abilities. Whereas a math teacher can quickly pinpoint where an error was made on a test, there aren&rsquo;t always definitive &ldquo;rights&rdquo; and &ldquo;wrongs&rdquo; when it comes to physical movement. By using the SPARK program and our iPads, we can record the students in action and then use the playback for video analysis. This ensures that we have a thorough, tangible assessment of the students&rsquo; abilities. An eighth grader who is practicing a tennis serve, for example, can see what she&rsquo;s doing right and wrong on the playback, clearly visualize her actions, and then make the necessary adjustments. This is a lot more effective than a PE teacher telling her that she&rsquo;s &ldquo;not following through properly,&rdquo; or &ldquo;not holding the racquet the right way.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Motor skills are another area that we address quickly on our iPads. Whether we are on the basketball court, tennis court, or soccer field, wee just download the supporting curriculum from our PE program (I have some of them stored permanently in my iBook&rsquo;s application for quick access), open up the application, and show students a quick video on how to kick a soccer ball, throw a softball, or shoot a basket.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The iPads have also proven themselves as time-saving administrative tools. We use them to record grades, fitness data, and other important information without having to sit down at a desktop or laptop. We recently bought a cable that connects the tablets with our classroom projectors, allowing us to show videos to larger numbers of students in group settings. I&rsquo;ll kick off our PE program&rsquo;s dance unit, for example, by showing videos that walk students through a variety of steps and moves.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">As any middle school teacher will tell you, technology has significantly impacted the way we teach. With the right mix of tools and software, we&rsquo;ve been able to help children learn much better and achieve their grade-level standards. In that respect, our jobs have become much easier. That&rsquo;s pretty significant in an era where the typical public school teacher is facing a unique set of challenges with budget cuts and increasing class sizes.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Of course, not all teachers are quick to embrace this &ldquo;new&rdquo; way of teaching. This is fairly normal in a vocation where some individuals want to try new things and others prefer more traditional methods. What I&rsquo;ve found is that, in most cases, the second group just lacks understanding. When they don&rsquo;t know the capabilities and benefits of the technology, they shy away from it. Software, equipment, and devices are left to gather dust in the corner of the classroom, and the teacher goes back to his or her old ways of doing things.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">To help teachers break through these barriers, we work closely with them to ensure maximum comfort levels with the technology. Using Professional Learning Communities (PLCs), our district offers weekly (at minimum) sessions for teachers who need additional support with classroom technology. We also strive to put technology tools into the hands of as many instructors as possible&mdash;something that&rsquo;s not always easy to do in today&rsquo;s budgetary climate. By using grants as a support mechanism, we&rsquo;ve been able to achieve our goals in this area.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Our end objective with these technology initiatives is simply to get kids moving during a time when fun stuff like online gaming and social networking are creating highly sedentary lifestyles for our country&rsquo;s youth. By integrating our own technological innovations into the curriculum&mdash;and by reaching students on their own turf with online videos&mdash;we can get them moving, burning calories, and ultimately creating more active lifestyles. We want our MVPA (Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity) times to be high and our kids to enjoy movement and activity. It&rsquo;s as simple as that.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">By combining SPARK&rsquo;s movement-based curriculum with the user-friendly iPad, we&rsquo;ve been able to take several steps toward achieving our goal. Our PE department has been able to work more efficiently and effectively during a time when budget cuts and other hurdles make it difficult to be out there in the trenches, teaching 60 kids how to move.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><i><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Danielle Cherry is a seventh grade physical education teacher and assistant grant coordinator at Eastlake Middle School in Chula Vista, Calif.</span></i>&nbsp;</div>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/08/01/how-one-california-school-uses-ipads-to-support-its-pe-programs/\">http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/08/01/how-one-california-school-uses-ipads-to-support-its-pe-programs/</a></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p>&nbsp;<span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; font-family: Arial; \">Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Promethean Unveil the First Complete Set of Common Core Aligned Interactive Whiteboard Lessons for K-12 Educators</span></b></span><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n<o:AllowPNG />\n</o:OfficeDocumentSettings>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:WordDocument>\n<w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom>\n<w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves>\n<w:TrackFormatting />\n<w:PunctuationKerning />\n<w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>\n<w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>\n<w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>\n<w:ValidateAgainstSchemas />\n<w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>\n<w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent>\n<w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>\n<w:Compatibility>\n<w:BreakWrappedTables />\n<w:DontGrowAutofit />\n<w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables />\n<w:DontVertAlignInTxbx />\n</w:Compatibility>\n</w:WordDocument>\n</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>\n<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState=\"false\" LatentStyleCount=\"276\">\n</w:LatentStyles>\n</xml><![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]>\n<style>\n/* Style Definitions */\ntable.MsoNormalTable\n{mso-style-name:\"Table Normal\";\nmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;\nmso-tstyle-colband-size:0;\nmso-style-noshow:yes;\nmso-style-parent:\"\";\nmso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;\nmso-para-margin:0in;\nmso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;\nmso-pagination:widow-orphan;\nfont-size:12.0pt;\nfont-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;\nmso-fareast-font-family:\"Times New Roman\";\nmso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;\nmso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;\nmso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}\n</style>\n<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment-->\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">A unique collaboration between Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Promethean, has resulted in two completely developed, ready-to-use collections of Common Core interactive whiteboard lessons for reading and mathematics.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Unveiled at the International Society for Technology Education (ISTE 2012), a national conference for technology-using educators, these new lessons integrate best-in-class content from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt with best-in-class interactive and touch-screen technology from Promethean to create learning activities that promote problem solving, critical thinking, and class discussion. This is the first complete set of interactive Common Core aligned whiteboard lessons available to K-12 educators.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Two collections were released &ndash; mathematics for grades K -12 that follow Houghton Mifflin Harcourt&rsquo;s award-winning programs, GOMath! and On Core Mathematics, as well as reading for K-6 based on HMH&rsquo;s Journeys series. All lessons are designed to run on any interactive whiteboard. However, it is Promethean&rsquo;s presentation software ActivInspire&trade; that delivers the interactivity.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The new lessons promote more hands-on activities. On an interactive whiteboard, students engage in on-screen modeling of concepts, use visual and tactile manipulations to reinforce their understanding of math concepts, or work together to solve digital math equations.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;It is more critical than ever that educators reach 21st Century learners utilizing proven programs and technologies that engage students,&rdquo; said Bethlam Forsa, EVP, Global Content and Product Development, for HMH. &ldquo;Cutting-edge interactive whiteboard lessons such as these, feature a unique blend of elements that will help students master the material, while providing teachers with an effective way to align their lessons to Common Core Standards.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Every lesson has embedded assessment activities and with a simple connection to a hand-held device, such as any of Promethean&rsquo;s Learner Response Systems (ActivExpression&trade;, ActivEngage&trade; ActiVote&trade;), teachers can track the comprehension, measure understanding and modify instruction if necessary.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Research shows that when students actively participate, their performance improves. By fusing math and reading content with interactive tools, students get excited about learning critical concepts and will be better prepared for standard assessments,&rdquo; said Jim Marshall, President, Promethean North America. &ldquo;With these interactive lessons, teachers can effortlessly create memorable and dynamic lessons to meet the needs of all students.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">In related news, recent results from a study conducted by York University found that the integrated use of the tools with interactive content could reduce up to 3 months of learning time among elementary students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">For more information about the new On Core Lessons for Common Core Math, please visit <a href=\"http://www.prometheanworld.com/HMH\">www.prometheanworld.com/HMH</a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">source: <a href=\"http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/07/23/houghton-mifflin-harcourt-and-promethean-unveil-the-first-complete-set-of-common-core-aligned-interactive-whiteboard-lessons-for-k-12-educators/\">http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/07/23/houghton-mifflin-harcourt-and-promethean-unveil-the-first-complete-set-of-common-core-aligned-interactive-whiteboard-lessons-for-k-12-educators/&nbsp;</a></div>\n<p><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"> </span></p>\n<hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; \">Intel, schools hoping to lure more students into science and engineering</span></b></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Would you buy a deodorizing shoe rack? How about one that suggests outfits to go with your footwear?</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">To a layperson, brainstorming about how to build a better shoe rack might not look like engineering.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">But working together to create new things is part of engineering, and Carlos Contreras of Intel said young people need to get that message. He said they often don&rsquo;t know that engineering can be a creative process&mdash;or even what engineering is, exactly.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;In a survey of teens, we find that they have high regard for engineering as a profession, but don&rsquo;t know what engineers do or how much they make,&rdquo; he said.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">That&rsquo;s important to Contreras, who is Intel&rsquo;s education manager. The company recently had to pay $100,000 to Sandoval County, N.M., because its Rio Rancho plant failed to hire enough local employees, which Intel officials said was owing to a lack of qualified applicants, particularly those with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Contreras said this is a problem nationally.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;This is really a big national issue that everyone is grappling with,&rdquo; Contreras said. &ldquo;For every available STEM worker, there are two openings.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Throughout New Mexico and the rest of the nation, groups from Intel, the national science labs, universities, and other organizations are trying to get students more interested in such subjects and get them qualified for high-tech jobs.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">It&rsquo;s an issue experts say starts in the early grades, where many students don&rsquo;t get enough hands-on science projects, so they decide at a young age they don&rsquo;t like science.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Some teachers and students say this is because increased emphasis on reading and math, which are measured on high-stakes tests, has squeezed the time spent on science. And although math is tested and is a building block of science and engineering, New Mexico&rsquo;s emphasis in recent years has been on improving reading scores.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">According to the most recent state standardized test scores, only 43 percent of students statewide can do math at grade level.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">State education chief Hanna Skandera said she believes reading is a key building block for all other skills, but she plans to roll out some STEM initiatives soon.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Russ Fisher-Ives, who runs a nonprofit focused on those subjects and who co-founded the state&rsquo;s largest robotics competition, said adding emphasis on math isn&rsquo;t enough, because students need science to see math in action.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">&nbsp;&ldquo;It&rsquo;s got to be a whole community that is saying math is important, but not just for the sake of learning math,&rdquo; Fisher-Ives said. &ldquo;You&rsquo;ve got to see where it&rsquo;s used.&rdquo;</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Fisher-Ives said RoboRAVE International, which he co-founded, is growing every year. More students would be drawn to science, he said, if they did more hands-on projects, worked in teams, and competed.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;The book work and tests have a place, but we&rsquo;ve lost that approach of engaging kids in a high-energy, sports-like environment for academics,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;A human being doesn&rsquo;t just walk up and start doing math and science and just get this instant love for it. It takes some work.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Even students who enter college planning to pursue a STEM career are struggling, with about 40 percent leaving their major. Contreras said this is partly because the first few years are grueling and the &ldquo;fun&rdquo; aspects of engineering&mdash;where students get to create things&mdash;don&rsquo;t come until later.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">That&rsquo;s where building a better shoe rack comes in. This summer, Intel is running a six-week program for college students who are in their first two years of a STEM degree. Students develop apps and products, meet with professionals, and build robotics.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Vanessa Putnam, who has finished her freshman year as a chemical engineering student at New Mexico State University, said she is &ldquo;getting inspired to be an engineer&rdquo; through the program.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;It shows you that it&rsquo;s fun and sociable and it&rsquo;s a people world, not just a math and science world,&rdquo; Putnam said.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The Intel program targets students who are already interested in engineering and might just need an extra reason to stick with it. But Matt Nyman worries about those who are turned off to science as children.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Nyman, a University of New Mexico professor, teaches a course for students pursuing a degree in elementary education who want to brush up on their science content knowledge. He also works with teachers in Bernalillo Public Schools, helping them improve the way they teach science and integrate it into other subjects.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Nyman said teachers are told to focus on math and reading&mdash;the subjects that are tested and used to measure school performance&mdash;to the detriment of non-tested subjects like science.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;Talking with teachers, they have no time to teach science,&rdquo; Nyman said.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">A survey of eighth-grade science teachers, released by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, found that 27 percent reported that their students did hands-on experiments &ldquo;once or twice a month&rdquo; or less.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Even successful students are critical of the system. Elisabeth Burton, who will be a junior next year at Rio Rancho High School, won distinction at this year&rsquo;s national Intel Science and Engineering Fair.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">She attributes her love of science to her parents and said many of her peers have been turned off to the subject. She said that&rsquo;s because they learn science as facts, rather than a process of answering questions.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&nbsp;&ldquo;Just as in math, there&rsquo;s a lot of negative attitudes toward science,&rdquo; Burton said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s, &lsquo;Oh, I have to memorize this for biology.&rsquo; You think of science and you think memorization, which I think has been ingrained in kids since they were little.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Nyman said he has also found that his students, the ones studying to become teachers, don&rsquo;t understand science very well and don&rsquo;t feel confident in their ability to teach it.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Nyman said he believes this is partly because the students are products of No Child Left Behind, a federal law passed in 2001 that relies heavily on test scores in math and reading to evaluate school performance.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;I believe we are seeing fully the impact of No Child Left Behind,&rdquo; Nyman said, adding that future teachers &ldquo;come to UNM without the skills to succeed. They come in without the basic science.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Nyman also said state education leadership focuses on the importance of reading, while science and math advocates often run their own programs in isolation&mdash;like the Intel camp or RoboRAVE. Nyman said this is partly because the Public Education Department has cut the STEM department and no longer has a science coordinator.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Skandera acknowledged there are unfilled positions but said she has moved money in the budget and expects to open up two STEM positions in mid- to late summer. She said one will focus on math, the other on science.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Skandera also acknowledged that she came into her position with a heavy focus on reading initiatives, but said she plans to roll out more STEM projects soon, including competitive grants for robotics competitions and for low-performing schools to purchase science lab kits.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;I think it&rsquo;s fair to say, we absolutely consider reading a foundation for success,&rdquo; Skandera said. &ldquo;But it&rsquo;s a beginning point, not an end point.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"line-height:150%\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.eclassroomnews.com/2012/07/26/intel-schools-hoping-to-lure-more-students-into-science-and-engineering/?\">http://www.eclassroomnews.com/2012/07/26/intel-schools-hoping-to-lure-more-students-into-science-and-engineering/?</a></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><span style=\"line-height: 36px; \">Mobile App Competition Engages High School Students in STEM</span></span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">By his own admission, Andrew Rothstein, curriculum director at the&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://naf.org/\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">National Academy Foundation</span></a>, has a steep learning curve where technology is concerned.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">&quot;I can\'t even keep up with what was, let alone adapt to what is, or even imagine what will be,&quot; Rothstein said to a room full of educators and students last week at the foundation\'s annual conference.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">The former teacher\'s lack of technical expertise illustrates why&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">high schools</span></a>&nbsp;need to leverage industry expertise when trying to determine what to teach young adults about information technology.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">&quot;You can imagine the challenge of being the architect of something about which you know nothing,&quot; he said. &quot;I\'ve never downloaded an app. But fortunately I have a safety net.&quot;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">For the National Academy Foundation, that safety net was&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.lenovo.com/us/en/\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">Lenovo</span></a>, a computer company that manufactures PC laptops, desktops, and tablet computers.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">NAF and Lenovo launched a competition at the start of the spring 2012 semester, challenging high school students to develop Android-based mobile applications using Lenovo\'s ThinkPad Tablet. The foundation piloted the program in five NAF academies:<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/new-york/districts/new-york-city-public-schools/grover-cleveland-high-school-13340\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">Grover Cleveland High School</span></a>&nbsp;in New York,&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/north-carolina/districts/wake-county-public-school-system/apex-high-14744\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">Apex High School</span></a>&nbsp;in North Carolina,&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/connecticut/districts/hartford-school-district/pathways-to-technology-magnet-school-4468\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">Pathways to Technology Magnet High School</span></a>&nbsp;in Connecticut,&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/california/districts/los-angeles-unified-school-district/downtown-magnets-high-school-2610\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">Downtown Magnets High School</span></a>&nbsp;in California, and&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/texas/districts/waco-independent-school-district/a-j-moore-acad-20036\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">A.J. Moore Academy of Information Technology</span></a>&nbsp;in Texas.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">The National Academy Foundation builds curriculums focused on bridging the gap between education and business communities. The foundation&rsquo;s network includes more than 500 career academies that serve more than 50,000 students. Schools must submit proposals and an application to become a career academy or start one on their campus.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">Lenovo provided the tablets and the focus&mdash;mobile technology&mdash;but left the structure and implementation up to the teachers and administrators at each high school.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">The competition succeeded at getting students, teachers, and the foundation excited about&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/high-school-notes/2012/06/20/for-most-us-high-schoolers-stem-knowledge-is-only-skin-deep\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">STEM</span></a>&nbsp;(science, technology, engineering, and math). Students developed business plans and built apps from scratch&mdash;everything from a note-taking program with voice-to-text capability to an app stocked with Dominican food recipes.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">The NAF-Lenovo competition also highlighted the logistical challenges of implementing this type of program on a larger scale.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">Three of the five schools ran the programs as an after-school or enrichment option due to restraints in their curriculum, and Grover Cleveland High School was the only one able to dedicate the class time needed to take their students\' apps from concept to completion.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">The mobile app class at Grover Cleveland was allotted a double class period, giving the 40 seniors participating in the project enough time to complete their mobile apps, and students used an app-building program to assist them with the coding and design. Of the 20 apps created by the students, 17 are available for download on&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=Grover+Cleveland+High+School\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 95, 168); text-decoration: none; \">Google Play</span></a>, the Android App store.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">In contrast, Robert East and Pete Baus, seniors at A.J. Moore Academy, estimate they only had 24 hours of class time over 12 weeks to devote to their note-taking app. The time constraints and the duo\'s limited coding knowledge made it difficult to pull together a functional program, they said at the conference.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 10pt; line-height: 19px; \"><span style=\"line-height: 19px; \">While NAF plans to take what it learned from the partnership and revamp what its career tech academies look like, JD Hoye, president of the NAF, said it will take several years to revise and roll out a new curriculum to all of its schools.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom: 16pt; line-height: 19px; \">&nbsp;source:&nbsp;<a style=\"text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/high-school-notes/2012/07/23/mobile-app-competition-engages-high-school-students-in-stem\">http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/high-school-notes/2012/07/23/mobile-app-competition-engages-high-school-students-in-stem&nbsp;</a></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">&nbsp;<b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; \">A\'s to Reveal Chevron\'s &quot;STEM Zone&quot; and the Science of Baseball at the A\'s vs. Yankees Games July 20-22</span></b> </span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">The Oakland A&rsquo;s, the Exploratorium and Chevron USA Inc. will launch the &ldquo;STEM Zone,&rdquo;&reg; a hands-on exhibit that explores the science behind the fundamentals of baseball, during the July 20-22 A&rsquo;s vs. New York Yankees games at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. Chevron&rsquo;s STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Zone aims to inspire interest in math and the sciences among our Bay Area youth.</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The STEM Zone, to be located in the Coliseum on the southern end of the Eastside Club, will feature learning stations exploring the physics, biology, and mathematics behind our national pastime. Exhibits provide a scientific inside-look at the vibration of a bat and its &ldquo;sweet spot,&rdquo; the aerodynamics of curveball and knuckleball, gravity and parabolic arcs, and a player&rsquo;s biological reaction time. Baseball players &ndash; whether pros or kids in their backyard -- are intuitive scientists performing experiments in their laboratory: a baseball diamond.&nbsp; Recent studies have shown that the success of STEM education will determine whether the United States will have the needed technical capacity to solve challenges in areas such as energy, health, environmental protection and national security.&nbsp;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;We are excited to show fans the science and technology principles behind the game of baseball at the STEM Zone this weekend,&rdquo; said Ken Pries, Oakland A&rsquo;s vice president of broadcasting and communications. &ldquo;The A&rsquo;s and Chevron are working together to help make science fun and spark greater interest among Bay Area students in becoming the scientists and engineers of tomorrow.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">As part of their &ldquo;Science of the Game&rdquo; program this season, which deepens interest and understanding of science among Bay Area youth, the A&rsquo;s and Chevron have designed and distributed more than 15,000 &ldquo;Science of the Game&rdquo; workbooks to Bay Area schools that utilize science formulas to answer questions related to various aspects of the game of baseball. The three workbooks, targeting grades 1-2, 3-5, and 6-8, are also available at <a href=\"http://www.oaklandathletics.com/science\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">www.oaklandathletics.com/science</span></a>. Students who complete their workbooks and submit their answer sheet to the A&rsquo;s will receive two ticket vouchers (restrictions apply).</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&rdquo;A well-educated workforce is one of the cornerstones of our state&rsquo;s competiveness&rsquo;s and is critical for the success of our business,&rdquo; said Joe Laymon, Chevron&rsquo;s vice president of Human Resources. &ldquo;Chevron believes STEM education programs are vital because, as a company operating in California for over 130 years, we have a vested interest in preparing our state&rsquo;s students for future employment&rdquo;..&rdquo;&nbsp;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">Because STEM education is critical to preparing youth for the increasing percentage of technical jobs in the modern economy, Chevron has developed the STEM Zone&reg; and several other programs in partnership with nonprofits, school districts and other partners as part of a multifaceted approach to supporting STEM education. In Richmond, Calif., Chevron partnered with Project Lead The Way, the City of Richmond and the West Contra Costa Unified School District to introduce new curriculum and fund and install a computer lab at Richmond High School. Since 2009, Chevron has invested over $15 million to support STEM education programs that have reached more than 500,000 students and 6,700 teachers in California.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">Tickets for Oakland A&rsquo;s home games can be purchased at all usual ticket outlets, including the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Box Office, online at <a href=\"http://www.oaklandathletics.com/tickets\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">www.oaklandathletics.com/tickets</span></a>, or over the phone by calling 877-493-BALL (2255). Season, group (including all fundraising options) and suite tickets can be purchased by calling 510-638-GoA&rsquo;s (4627).&nbsp;</div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://oakland.athletics.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20120718&amp;content_id=35143126&amp;vkey=pr_oak&amp;c_id=oak\">http://oakland.athletics.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20120718&amp;content_id=35143126&amp;vkey=pr_oak&amp;c_id=oak</a></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; \">California STEM Learning Network Lauds Proposal to Create World-Class STEM Teaching Corps</span></b></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The <a href=\"http://www.cslnet.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">California STEM Learning Network (</span></a><a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22CSLNet%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">CSLNet</span></a>) and leaders from business and education are praising President <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Barack+Obama%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Barack Obama</span></a>&rsquo;s proposal to strengthen STEM education in America through a <a href=\"http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/07/17/president-obama-announces-plans-new-national-corps-recognize-and-reward-\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">new STEM Master Teacher Corps</span></a> that would develop and recognize talented teachers in science, technology, engineering and math.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">&ldquo;It is indisputable that STEM education is critical to our student&rsquo;s success and our state&rsquo;s leadership role as a global innovator,&rdquo; said <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Chris+Roe%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Chris Roe</span></a>, Chief Executive Officer of CSLNet. &ldquo;And the single most important factor in determining if a student will be successful is if she or he has a high quality teacher. This proposal will help California and the U.S. swiftly build a world-class STEM teaching workforce and is an instrumental investment in our economic future.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The administration would initially identify and support 50 Master STEM Teachers at 50 different sites, with plans of growing over four years to reach 10,000 Master Teachers. The plan is pending a $1 billion commitment from Congress.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">According to a <a href=\"http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/07/17/president-obama-announces-plans-new-national-corps-recognize-and-reward-\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">White House press release</span></a>, the STEM Master Teacher Corps will &ldquo;recognize and help retain America&rsquo;s most talented STEM teachers, build a community of practice among them, raise the profile of the STEM teaching profession, and leverage excellent teachers to collaborate with their peers to strengthen STEM education in America&rsquo;s public schools.&rdquo;</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">The Obama administration also announced plans to provide an immediate $100 million from the existing <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Teacher+Incentive+Fund%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Teacher Incentive Fund</span></a> to help school districts establish career ladders that identify, develop and leverage highly effective STEM teachers.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">In California, where students&rsquo; science and math scores rank among the lowest nationally, there is widespread agreement about the vital importance of improving STEM education to maintain California&rsquo;s ability to compete in a global economy.</span></div>\n<div style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"line-height:150%;\">California employers currently report not being able to find enough qualified workers to fill STEM jobs and by 2018 California will need trained STEM graduates to fill more than one million expected STEM jobs, by far the most of any state.</span></div>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-STEM-Learning-Network-Lauds-Proposal-3719256.php\">http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-STEM-Learning-Network-Lauds-Proposal-3719256.php</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; font-family: Arial; \">Two young math/science teachers win $175,000 grants aimed at bolstering STEM education</span></b></span><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n24.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"line-height:150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:\n150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Two young math and science teachers fresh from UC Berkeley&rsquo;s CalTEACH program have won $175,000 fellowships designed to help them remain in the teaching profession over the long term.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"line-height:150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:\n150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The two, Andrea Negrete of the Central Valley town of Parlier and Andrew McCarty of Redwood City, both 2012 Berkeley graduates, are among 34 beginning high-school teachers in 19 states selected for Knowles Science Teaching Foundation fellowships for 2012.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Both CalTEACH and the Knowles program are part of a nationwide effort to fill a big gap in American schooling by supporting teaching in what are known as the STEM fields &mdash; science, technology, engineering and math.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Berkeley&rsquo;s CalTEACH program, which graduated its first credentialed teacher in 2011 and its first full cohort of students this year, places undergraduates in local classrooms to beef up math and science education and to serve as college-going role models.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Knowles tackles a different part of the problem: supporting teachers as they established themselves in fields where half of all teachers leave within the first five years. The fellowships cover the first five years of teachers&rsquo; careers; Negrete and McCarty will take part in a program that includes professional development, teaching tools and materials and access to a nationwide network of their peers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">At Berkeley, both received National Science Foundation-funded Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships, aimed at bolstering math and science education in K-12, while at Berkeley. And both graduated with an unswerving commitment to teaching.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The daughter of recent immigrants from Mexico, Negrete is a strong advocate of higher education as a path for her community&rsquo;s advancement. She&rsquo;s also a crack mathematician.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">She earned her bachelor&rsquo;s degree in math as well as her teaching credential at Berkeley. As a Robert Noyce Teacher Scholar, she has served as an instructor in elementary and middle schools in Oakland and Richmond through the East Bay Academy of Young Scientists. As a teacher, she says, she hopes to &ldquo;challenge my students to learn the practicality of mathematics, give them the tools they may need to succeed in our society and bridge the gap of inequities in our educational system.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">She told her local newspaper, the Fresno Bee, that she will be back at Berkeley in the fall, earning a master&rsquo;s in math education in the Graduate School of Education. In addition, she will be teaching one or two classes and is looking for a position in a nearby school.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">McCarty earned his bachelor&rsquo;s degree in astrophysics and his teaching credential at Berkeley, and maintains his fascination with how the world works &mdash; an enthusiasm he&rsquo;s proven able to pass along to students as a high-school peer tutor, a teaching assistant to his high-school physics teacher and a Robert Noyce scholar. He has built his own telescope and traveled to Yosemite and Death Valley to look at the stars.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Of his hope to teach high-school physics, McCarty says that &ldquo;I particularly want to work with high-risk populations to help reduce the achievement gap.&rdquo; He, too, is looking for a teaching job in the fall, and hopes to find one in the Bay Area.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">CalTEACH, says McCarty, provided critical in-class teaching experience, &ldquo;as well as a wonderful, supportive and collaborative community.&rdquo; He remains in touch with his CalTEACH cohort and exchanges curriculum ideas with members online.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Program director Elisa Stone says she and others involved with CalTEACH are thrilled about the fellowships.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;We&rsquo;re really proud of the students for being recognized for being so well-qualified and having great leadership potential,&rdquo; Stone said. &ldquo;And we are excited that they will have access to this professional development and the ability to connect nationwide, beyond UC Berkeley and beyond California.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"line-height:150%\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">The students will continue to get campus support, too, through a new program for first-year teachers called CalTEACH Transitions, funded by JP Morgan Chase. It offers workshops, discussion groups, peer examination of student work and reflection on teaching, according to Stone.</span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial\"><o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2012/07/05/two-young-mathscience-teachers-win-175000-grants-to-teach/\">http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2012/07/05/two-young-mathscience-teachers-win-175000-grants-to-teach/</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:16.0pt;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><b><span style=\"line-height: 150%; font-family: Arial; \">UC Davis receives $1.6 million grant to aid K-12 students</span></b></span><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:24.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><o:p></o:p></span></b></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:24.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><a href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/UC+Davis/\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;color:#1B0981;font-weight:normal;text-decoration:none;\ntext-underline:none\">UC Davis</span></a></span></b><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"> has received a $1.6 million grant from the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation that will allow it to improve science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education in schools throughout Davis and Dixon.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">The four-year grant will bring together <a href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/University+of+California/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">University of California,</span></a> Davis, professors and K-12 teachers from the Davis and Dixon school districts to create a curriculum meant to improve students\' reasoning skills.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">The project, which is being called Innovations in STEM Teaching, Achievement and Research, or I-STAR, is being developed in accordance with nationwide initiatives to develop new math and science standards that will better prepare students for college and careers.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">&quot;We want to provide (children), as future citizens, with a lens into what it is that scientists actually do,&quot; said Cindy Passmore, the UC Davis associate professor who is leading the project. &quot;The exposure will help them make an informed choice about whether they want to go into (science and math) fields or not.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">UC Davis researchers and graduate students will interview students, observe classrooms and analyze <a href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/test+scores/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">test scores</span></a> over the next four years to measure the program\'s outcomes.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">&quot;We\'re trying to understand what\'s already happening in the classroom before creating a curriculum that fills in the gaps we find,&quot; said Passmore.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">&quot;We plan on building on and amplifying good things that are already happening.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">According to a UC Davis news release, the grant will allow a team of 34 participants &ndash; ranging from elementary school teachers to UC Davis faculty &ndash; to work together on the project.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\">The S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation was founded in 1957 with a mission to improve &quot;the quality of life for Californians by addressing selected issues that challenge the health and prosperity of that state.&quot;</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/10/4619979/uc-davis-receives-16-million-grant.html\">http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/10/4619979/uc-davis-receives-16-million-grant.html</a></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;text-align:justify;line-height:\n150%;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:\nPalatino\"><a href=\"http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/10/4619979/uc-davis-receives-16-million-grant.html\"><o:p></o:p></a></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">California joins STEMx</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">The <a href=\"http://www.cslnet.org/\"><span style=\"color:#B23B00;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">California STEM Learning Network</span></a> (CSLNet) joined Battelle and twelve other state STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) networks to officially launch <a href=\"http://www.stemx.us/\"><span style=\"color:#B23B00;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">STEMx</span></a> at the recent <a href=\"http://usnewsstemsolutions.com/\"><span style=\"color:\n#B23B00;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">U.S. News STEM Solutions Summit</span></a> in Dallas, Texas. Led by the Battelle Memorial Institute, STEMx connects state networks and partners to accelerate the growth of policies, practices and partnerships that will expand the number of STEM teachers, increase student achievement in STEM education and, ultimately, grow tomorrow&rsquo;s innovators.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">&ldquo;We are proud to be one of thirteen initial state partners at the launch of STEMx, an effort that will help us meet our goal of preparing STEM-capable graduates to compete in today&rsquo;s global economy,&rdquo; said <a href=\"http://cslnet.org/our_team/#&amp;panel1-1\"><span style=\"color:#B23B00;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Chris Roe, Chief Executive Officer of CSLNet</span></a>.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">Guided by the principles that diverse multi-sector partnerships significantly enhance the student learning experience and that the greatest power to transform STEM teaching and learning exists at the state-level, STEMx connects states and stakeholders from across K-12 and higher education, business, government, philanthropy and the community to impact STEM education and workforce development.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">The Network&rsquo;s core work of education, engagement and exchange will be propelled by an accessible technology platform enabling states to share, analyze and disseminate quality STEM education ideas, tools and practices. Through this process, STEMx will amplify innovative and transformative work already underway in California and other member states.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">&ldquo;The need for STEMx could not be more urgent and timely, especially in light of the adoption of the <a href=\"http://www.corestandards.org/\"><span style=\"color:\n#B23B00;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Common Core State Standards</span></a> and <a href=\"http://www.nextgenscience.org/\"><span style=\"color:#B23B00;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Next Generation Science Standards</span></a> by so many states. STEMx will certainly play a key role in collectively solving problems and driving much needed change,&rdquo; said Roe.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">The STEMx launch began with a marquee talk-show panel featuring Global Cultural Ambassador Kareem Abdul-Jabbar as host. In the spirit of the high-tech nature of STEMx, attendees were treated to a ribbon cutting featuring roving and aerial robots programmed by students and faculty from the University of Texas at Dallas. The afternoon concluded with ten breakout sessions on subjects including educational innovation, public policy, public-private partnerships and community engagement. Each session featured a cross-section of representatives from the thirteen initial STEMx member states, showcasing the collaborative work and leadership of STEMx states.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">Roe led a session on STEM policy and CSLNet chief educational officer <a href=\"http://cslnet.org/our_team/#&amp;panel1-2\"><span style=\"color:#B23B00;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Marcella Klein Williams</span></a> participated in the panel &ldquo;It Takes a Village,&rdquo; highlighting CSLNet&rsquo;s collaborative partnership to scale high quality STEM programming during afterschool.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:13.0pt;line-height:150%;mso-pagination:\nnone;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:\n13.0pt;line-height:150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\">Other STEMx member states include Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas and Washington.<o:p></o:p></span><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:13.0pt;line-height:\n150%;font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:&quot;Lucida Grande&quot;\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\">source:<a href=\"http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/07/11/california-stem-learning-network-cslnet-joins-12-other-states-launch-stemx\"> http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/07/11/california-stem-learning-network-cslnet-joins-12-other-states-launch-stemx&nbsp;</a>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<div id=\"above\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; \">\n<div class=\"switchtoheader\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 8px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; \">\n<div id=\"aboveleft\" class=\"aboveleft\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 4px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; width: 579px; float: left; \">\n<div class=\"headlines assetContainer pressrelease\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; float: left; \">\n<div class=\"withoutdred\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; float: left; \">\n<div><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \">Northrop Grumman Awards Grants to Los Angeles</span></span></span></div>\n<div>&nbsp;</div>\n<div><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"> Area Schools to Promote Science, Technology,</span></span></span></div>\n<div>&nbsp;</div>\n<div><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"> Engineering and Mathematics</span></span></span></div>\n</div>\n</div>\n</div>\n</div>\n</div>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \">&nbsp;</p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">Northrop Grumman Corporation&nbsp;</span></span><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">has provided grants worth a total of $2,700 to support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) educational initiatives at the Greater Los Angeles area schools.</span></span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">Northrop Grumman awarded nine individual grants of $300 each to teachers in local elementary, middle and high schools to fund projects that increase student awareness of opportunities in STEM fields. The grants were open to teachers at any public or charter school with an open enrollment policy. Selection was based upon the proposed activity\'s potential to engage students and the level of STEM focus.</span></span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">&quot;Northrop Grumman is committed to providing resources to help teachers promote awareness of the STEM disciplines to students at an early age,&quot; said Stephen J. Toner, vice president of Northrop Grumman\'s Azusa Operations. &quot;These grants will strengthen existing programs and better prepare students for careers in the technical fields.&quot;</span></span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">The grant program was announced in recognition of National Engineers Week in mid-February and winners were notified in May. Grants must be used in the current calendar year to purchase equipment, supplies, publications or transportation related to the proposed STEM project.</span></span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">The following teachers received the Northrop Grumman National Engineers Week STEM grants:</span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Louise Battles -- Mountain View Elementary School (Azusa) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Mike Dickinson -- Patrick Henry Elementary School (Anaheim) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Debbie Hill -- Gladstone St. Elementary School (Azusa) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Shinobu Hirota -- Brea Country Hills School (Brea) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- John Jones -- Diamond Bar High School (Diamond Bar) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Elizabeth Landrum -- Andres Duarte Elementary School (Duarte) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Alexis Piazza -- Gabriella Charter School (Los Angeles) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Tarek Salloum -- Patrick Henry Elementary School (Anaheim) </span></span></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"font-family: Arial; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"> -- Lindi Williams -- Gabriella Charter School (Los Angeles)</span></span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.marketwatch.com/story/northrop-grumman-awards-grants-to-los-angeles-area-schools-to-promote-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics-2012-06-29\">http://www.marketwatch.com/story/northrop-grumman-awards-grants-to-los-angeles-area-schools-to-promote-science-technology-engineering-and-mathematics-2012-06-29</a></p>\n<hr />\n<h1 class=\"headline entry-title\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: bold; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.5em; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: none; outline-color: initial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">California Governor Preserves High School Science Funding in State Budget</h1>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\"><a href=\"http://cslnet.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">The California STEM Learning Network</span></a> (CSLNet) is applauding California Governor <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Jerry+Brown%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Jerry Brown</span></a> for his decision to preserve funding for high school science in the budget he signed on Wednesday. The Governor had originally proposed to cut state funding for a second year of high school science, but his proposal faced significant opposition from a broad-based coalition concerned about the critical need for science education among California&rsquo;s&nbsp;students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;More than ever, we need to invest in our children&rsquo;s future. We applaud the Governor for demonstrating that he understands that science education is key to our children&rsquo;s ability to compete and our state&rsquo;s reputation as the leading global innovator. All students need to have a solid foundation in these critical subjects in order to be able to compete in the 21st century economy. This is why our coalition spoke out so strongly on this issue,&rdquo; said <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/?controllerName=search&amp;action=search&amp;channel=business%2Fprweb&amp;search=1&amp;inlineLink=1&amp;query=%22Chris+Roe%22\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">Chris Roe</span></a>, Chief Executive Officer of&nbsp;CSLNet.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">Currently, California requires its students to complete two years of high school science to graduate. Most states require students to complete three years, and some even require four&nbsp;years.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">While science education narrowly missed being a victim of the state budget crisis, education advocates and leaders &ndash; including the California STEM Learning Network and <a href=\"http://www.cde.ca.gov/eo/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson</span></a> &ndash; have been stepping up efforts to improve science, technology, engineering and math (<a href=\"http://cslnet.org/our_mission/#&amp;panel1-2\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;\ntext-decoration:none;text-underline:none\">STEM</span></a>) education. In fact, California&rsquo;s participation in the development and expected 2013 adoption of the <a href=\"http://www.nextgenscience.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">Next Generation Science Standards</span></a> will help to ensure that California students have access to a world-class education in science and&nbsp;engineering.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;While we are relieved that the State avoided cutting science education in the budget, we know that our work is not over. Improving STEM education is fundamental for our students,&rdquo; said&nbsp;Roe.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">According to the group <a href=\"http://www.changetheequation.org/\"><span style=\"color:#1B0981;text-decoration:\nnone;text-underline:none\">Change the Equation</span></a>, California employers currently report not being able to find enough qualified workers to fill STEM jobs. By 2018, California&rsquo;s STEM workforce is expected to grow by nearly 20%, twice the average of other&nbsp;jobs.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"margin-bottom:.25in;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:\nnone;text-autospace:none\"><span style=\"mso-bidi-font-size:18.0pt;font-family:\nArial;mso-bidi-font-family:Palatino\">&ldquo;Our education system needs to keep pace with this demand. To do otherwise, is to neglect the future of our students and of the economic vitality of the state as a whole,&rdquo; said&nbsp;Roe.</span><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"> <o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial\"><o:p>source: <a href=\"http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-Governor-Preserves-High-School-Science-3670770.php\">http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-Governor-Preserves-High-School-Science-3670770.php&nbsp;</a></o:p></span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<h1 id=\"story_headline\" class=\"entry-title\" style=\"font-weight: bold; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: rgb(2, 74, 130); line-height: 1em; font-size: 26px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">More Than 1,800 Inner City Students to Participate in STEM Programming</span>\n<div style=\"width: 1px; height: 1px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font: normal normal normal 10pt/normal sans-serif; text-align: left; text-transform: none; overflow-x: hidden; overflow-y: hidden; \">&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>\n</h1>\n<p>Beginning June 18 and over the next seven weeks, more than 1,800 elementary and middle school students across the country will become immersed in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) as they participate in the Summer Engineering Experience for Kids (SEEK) program. SEEK was coordinated through a partnership between SAE International and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), and will expose inner city students to hands-on projects and a valuable career path.</p>\n<p>&nbsp;&quot;This engaging and educational program has shown a tremendous impact on the communities it reaches,&quot; said&nbsp;<a rel=\"nofollow\" class=\" lingo_link\" style=\"outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(2, 74, 130); border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dotted; border-bottom-color: initial; cursor: pointer; display: inline; font-family: Georgia, \'Times New Roman\', Times, serif; font-size: 15px; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; \" href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/Matt+Miller/\">Matt Miller,</a>&nbsp;director, SAE Foundation and Pre-Professional Programs. &quot;Students will become engineers as they work in teams, think through challenges and create projects. Many of these students are experiencing new opportunities that are helping to shape&nbsp;<a rel=\"nofollow\" class=\" lingo_link lingo_link_hidden\" style=\"outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; text-decoration: none; color: black; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: none; border-bottom-color: initial; border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; cursor: pointer; display: inline; font-family: Georgia, \'Times New Roman\', Times, serif; font-size: 15px; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; \" href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/career+paths/\">career paths</a>&nbsp;in STEM fields.&quot;</p>\n<p style=\"margin-bottom: 15px; \">The SEEK program will be led by NSBE engineering students and technical professionals, using the National Science Board Award-winning curriculum,&nbsp;<i>A World in Motion&reg;&nbsp;</i>(<i>AWIM</i>).&nbsp;<i>AWIM</i>was developed by SAE International and allows students to work in teams to solve problems and create products while discovering the underlying math and science principles involved in the process. The program and curriculum are made possible through funds from major sponsors, like Caterpillar.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-bottom: 15px; \">&quot;College students from across the country will spend time with these students to become mentors for three weeks, but will make an impression on these kids that will last much longer,&quot; said Dr. Carl Mack, executive director of NSBE. &quot;These kids are seeing positive African American role models that are building bonds and investing time in each one of them. The mentors are helping to guide the next generation of aspiring engineers.&quot;</p>\n<p style=\"margin-bottom: 15px; \">Each week of the program, students will take on a new STEM project, present their final designs to a panel of local judges and participate in friendly competitions. This free program is offered to students in 3rd &ndash; 5th grade as well as 6th &ndash; 8th grade. It begins in&nbsp;<a rel=\"nofollow\" class=\" lingo_link\" style=\"outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(2, 74, 130); border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dotted; border-bottom-color: initial; cursor: pointer; display: inline; font-family: Georgia, \'Times New Roman\', Times, serif; font-size: 15px; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; \" href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/San+Diego/\">San Diego</a>&nbsp;on June 18, continuing for three-week-long sessions across six locations. The schedule is as follows:</p>\n<ul type=\"disc\">\n <li>San Diego, CA (<a rel=\"nofollow\" class=\" lingo_link\" style=\"outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(2, 74, 130); border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dotted; border-bottom-color: initial; cursor: pointer; display: inline; font-family: Georgia, \'Times New Roman\', Times, serif; font-size: 15px; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; \" href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/San+Diego+State+University/\">San Diego State University</a>) June 18 &ndash; July 6 (8:30 a.m. &ndash; 3:30 p.m.)&nbsp;<b>Sponsors:</b>&nbsp;Accurate Engineering, Caterpillar, Life Technologies,&nbsp;<a rel=\"nofollow\" class=\" lingo_link\" style=\"outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(2, 74, 130); border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: dotted; border-bottom-color: initial; cursor: pointer; display: inline; font-family: Georgia, \'Times New Roman\', Times, serif; font-size: 15px; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; \" href=\"http://topics.sacbee.com/Northrop+Grumman/\">Northrop Grumman,</a>&nbsp;San Diego Gas &amp; Electric, Solar Turbines and US MARINES</li>\n</ul>\n<ul type=\"disc\">\n <li>Oakland, CA (Martin Luther King Elementary) June 25 &ndash; July 13 (8:30 a.m. &ndash; 3:30 p.m. weekdays M-F)&nbsp;<b>Sponsors:</b>&nbsp;Caterpillar, Chevron, INTEL, Northrop Grumman and SD Bechtel</li>\n</ul>\n<ul type=\"disc\">\n <li>Houston, TX (University of Houston) June 25 &ndash; July 14 (8:30 a.m. &ndash; 3:30 p.m. weekdays M-F)&nbsp;<b>Sponsors:</b>&nbsp;Caterpillar, SHELL and University of Houston</li>\n</ul>\n<ul type=\"disc\">\n <li>New Orleans July 2&mdash;July 20 (8:30 a.m. &ndash; 3:30 p.m. weekdays M-F)&nbsp;<b>Sponsors:&nbsp;</b>Caterpillar, Chevron and Re-New Schools</li>\n</ul>\n<ul type=\"disc\">\n <li>Washington D.C. (Elementary program: Langley Education Campus; Middle school program: Eliot Hine Middle School) July 2 &ndash; July 20 (8:30 a.m. &ndash; 3:30 p.m. weekdays M-F)<b>Sponsors:</b>&nbsp;Alcoa, Caterpillar, CUMMINS, GE, Northrop Grumman, ONR, US Coast Guard and US Navy</li>\n</ul>\n<ul type=\"disc\">\n <li>Detroit, MI (Bates Academy) July 16 &ndash; August 3 (8:30 a.m. &ndash; 3:30 p.m. weekdays M-F)<b>Sponsors:</b>&nbsp;Caterpillar, Delphi Foundation, Detroit Automobile Dealer Association, DOW and Ford Fund\n <div style=\"width: 1px; height: 1px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font: normal normal normal 10pt/normal sans-serif; text-align: left; text-transform: none; overflow-x: hidden; overflow-y: hidden; \"><br />\n Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/06/18/4570600/more-than-1800-inner-city-students.html#storylink=cpy</div>\n </li>\n</ul>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.sacbee.com/2012/06/18/4570600/more-than-1800-inner-city-students.html\">http://www.sacbee.com/2012/06/18/4570600/more-than-1800-inner-city-students.html</a></p>\n<hr />\n<div class=\"entry-title\">\n<h1 class=\"epi-fontLg bwalignc rteleft\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 246%/normal Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-align: center; font-size: 16px; display: block; font-weight: bold; \"><b><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">California Institutes Lead Effort to Bring Life Science Education, Workforce Training and Entrepreneurship to the National Stage</span></b></h1>\n</div>\n<p style=\"font-size: 13px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 1.39em; margin-left: 0px; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">The BayBio Institute and BIOCOM Institute have joined state bioscience organizations in a nationally coordinated effort to ensure America&rsquo;s leadership in bioscience innovation by delivering industry-led life science education, workforce development, and entrepreneurship programs across the country. The two institutions are both founding members of the newly established Coalition for Bioscience Institutes (CSBI), formally announced at the</span>&nbsp;<a target=\"_blank\" style=\"color: rgb(34, 109, 179); text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://cts.businesswire.com/ct/CT?id=smartlink&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fconvention.bio.org%2F&amp;esheet=50317262&amp;lan=en-US&amp;anchor=2012+BIO+International+Convention&amp;index=1&amp;md5=3d860adb0c922454e56a9528508f18a3\">2012 BIO International Convention</a>. <span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">With SoCalBIO&rsquo;s recent joining of the CSBI, California is fully represented at the table and will be able to maximize its impact nationally.</span></p>\n<p style=\"font-size: 13px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 1.39em; margin-left: 0px; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">&ldquo;Life science is one of the fastest growing sectors in the state\'s economy and the BayBio Institute and BIOCOM Institute have long been active in providing pioneering STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workforce and education programs here in California,&rdquo; said California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom. &ldquo;Both Institutes&rsquo; affiliation with the CSBI will allow programs developed here to be shared with other institutes, and allow our communities to collaborate with successful programs developed around the United States.&rdquo;</span></p>\n<p style=\"font-size: 13px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 1.39em; margin-left: 0px; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">Working together since December 2011, CSBI serves as an umbrella for standard practice sharing, joint fundraising and national initiatives for life science/STEM education (student education, career exploration and teacher professional</span> <span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">development); workforce development (workforce training, incumbent worker professional development, dislocated worker training); and entrepreneurship. CSBI provides the opportunity for state bioscience organizations to share knowledge with the goal of improving bioscience education and innovation, while maximizing industry support. With its focus in these areas, CSBI complements the life science policy work of the Council of State Bioscience Associations (CSBA), formed by the BIO in 2002.</span></p>\n<p style=\"font-size: 13px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 1.39em; margin-left: 0px; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">&ldquo;At the BayBio Institute, we have seen time and again the important relationship between workforce and economic development,&ldquo; said CSBI Acting Co-Chair Lori Lindburg, executive director of the BayBio Institute.&ldquo;The CSBI offers an opportunity to speak with a unified industry voice, and to share and scale programs across states that the life science industry is uniquely qualified to deliver. By leveraging members&rsquo; resources, the CSBI is positioned to make an even greater contribution to the life science industry by inspiring and preparing students, developing employees&rsquo; skills, and helping startup companies succeed.&rdquo;</span></p>\n<p style=\"font-size: 13px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 1.39em; margin-left: 0px; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">&quot;Our regional efforts have been creating jobs, stimulating economic growth, and supporting veterans to help save lives and promote green sustainability,&rdquo; said Kristie Grover, executive director at the BIOCOM Institute. &ldquo;Now we have a mechanism to share our successful practices and programs with other states. The national CSBI network will have a positive impact on creating meaningful workforce development experiences that strengthen the economy and make real strides in improving Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) education.&rdquo;</span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20120620005885/en/California-Institutes-Lead-Effort-Bring-Life-Science\">http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20120620005885/en/California-Institutes-Lead-Effort-Bring-Life-Science</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">Robotics program gives students a different kind of learning opportunity</span></p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Students from three southern California high schools showed how the young people of today are becoming the engineers of tomorrow.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Taking advantage of a new program in the Perris Union High School District, nearly 75 students from Paloma Valley, Heritage and Perris high schools competed in a Robotics Challenge in the Paloma Valley gym.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Working in teams, these students displayed their newly acquired knowledge of robot construction and computer science before a crowd of parents and other supporters. Teams competed for trophies in a variety of events testing their ability to maneuver their remote-controlled robots.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">The competition was hosted by Gears 2 Robots, a service company that uses robotic technology to train students with a program that follows the guidelines of the STEM educational concept -- science, technology, engineering and math. Through a contract with the school district, Gears 2 Robots has provided equipment and training in robotics to these students all semester.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&quot;The robotics industry is booming while a lot of other careers are caving in,&quot; said Andy Ross, founder of Gears 2 Robots and the director of Saturday\'s program. &quot;This is a multi-discipline activity; it involves mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&quot;The students learn the technology and they also learn to work as a team. One person is good at building the robot, another is good at the software end of it.&quot;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Across the room, team members from Paloma Valley High were making adjustments to their robot before taking it out for another round of competition. The challenge was to direct their robot to pick up as many small balls as possible, go up a ramp, then deposit the balls at the top of the structure.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&quot;It\'s different,&quot; Paloma Valley freshman Ethan Hanson said about the robotics competition. &quot;I had never even heard of this. Then Mr. Wilson (Paloma Valley High science teacher Michael Wilson) came in one day and said they needed some guys for this new club. I really enjoy the challenge.&quot;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Dian Martin, a teacher on assignment to the Perris High School District office, suggested the idea of a robotics program to district teachers and officials after taking her 6-year-old son to a class at Gears 2 Robots, which provides instruction for children as young as kindergarten age.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&quot;I said, \'We\'ve got to get this into our district,\' &quot; Martin said. &quot;I took it to some of our science teachers and we talked about how we could roll this out to our high schools.&quot;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Under the leadership of science teachers Wilson (Paloma Valley), Jackie Cooper (Perris) and Karen Martin (Heritage), the students have been working with the robots only since January. By next year, Dian Martin said, students from the three high schools will compete for the chance to enter national competitions. She said the district\'s motto for the program is &quot;Rigor and Relevance Using Robotics.&quot;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">Through funds designated for its Career Technical Education program, the district is able to pay for Gears 2 Robots\' services, including the equipment, and for stipends allowing the teachers to participate in the after-school program. There is no cost to the students.</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.menifee247.com/2012/06/robotics-program-gives-local-students.html\">http://www.menifee247.com/2012/06/robotics-program-gives-local-students.html</a></p>\n<p style=\"margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial\">&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<div class=\"switchtoheader\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 8px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-style: inherit; font-family: inherit; \"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><b>Northrop Grumman awards grants to L.A. teachers to support STEM education</b></span> </span>\n<div class=\"clear\" style=\"line-height: 17px; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; clear: both; \">&nbsp; &nbsp;</div>\n</div>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-family: inherit; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">Northrop Grumman Corporation&nbsp;</span><span style=\"font-size: 1.167em; line-height: 1.354em; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">has provided grants worth a total of $3,300 to support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) educational initiatives in Los Angeles metropolitan area schools.</span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">Northrop Grumman awarded 11 individual grants of $300 each to teachers in local elementary, middle and high schools to fund projects that increase student awareness of opportunities in STEM fields. The grants were open to teachers at any public or charter school with an open enrollment policy. Selection was based upon the proposed activity\'s potential to engage students and the level of STEM focus.</span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">The grant program was announced in recognition of National Engineers Week in mid-February and winners were notified in May. Grants must be used in the current calendar year to purchase equipment, supplies, publications or transportation related to the proposed STEM project.</span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">The following teachers received the Northrop Grumman National Engineers Week STEM grants:</span><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <span style=\"font-family: Verdana; \"><br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Robyn Arnold -- San Jose Highly Gifted Center (Mission Hills)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Judith Baumwirt -- Granada Hills Charter High School (Granada Hills)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Albert Estrada -- Valley Alternative Magnet School (Lake Balboa)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Christine Ferris -- Our Community School (Chatsworth)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Mia Kang -- Ernest Lawrence Middle School (Chatsworth)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Bryan Kerness -- William S. Hart Union High School District Regional<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Occupational Program (Santa Clarita)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Manfred Koch -- Juan Lagunas Soria Elementary (Oxnard)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Amy Leserman -- Fulton College Preparatory School (Van Nuys)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Kevin Lorch -- Mesa Verde Middle School (Moorpark)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Mario Mendoza -- William Mulholland Middle School (Lake Balboa)<br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; --&nbsp; Belinda Young -- Ernest Lawrence Middle School (Chatsworth)</span><br />\n&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />\n</span></p>\n<p id=\"\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 14px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 6px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 6px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 1.167em; font-family: inherit; line-height: 1.354em; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">&quot;Northrop Grumman is dedicated to supporting STEM education, particularly because that knowledge helps to form the foundation of our company,&quot; said Liz Iversen, sector vice president and general manager of Northrop Grumman\'s Navigation Systems division. &quot;We want to do our part in helping to foster an appreciation of these subjects--now and in the future.&quot;</span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.marketwatch.com/story/northrop-grumman-awards-grants-to-los-angeles-area-teachers-to-support-stem-education-initiatives-2012-06-13 \">http://www.marketwatch.com/story/northrop-grumman-awards-grants-to-los-angeles-area-teachers-to-support-stem-education-initiatives-2012-06-13&nbsp;</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">Livermore student hopes to smash the opportunity gap</span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">Yesenia Sanchez is the first of many students that Livermore school district leaders hope to pull off the sidelines and help smash the opportunity gap for its disadvantaged students.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">Sanchez was one of 120 students statewide and the first from the Livermore school district selected to participate in the Summer Math and Science Honors (SMASH) Academy, a five-week program designed to prepare high-achieving, low-income students of color for careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">&quot;Yesenia is our pioneer,&quot; said Melinda Hall, the Livermore school district\'s director of curriculum and special projects. &quot;We want to remove the barriers that keep students like Yesenia from applying to academies like these. If students don\'t feel included at the district or high school, they will sit on the sidelines.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">For the next three summers, Sanchez, a freshman at Granada High School, will spend five consecutive weeks at Stanford University taking a variety of science, technology, engineering and math courses and learning how to improve other skills like public speaking and how to survive college.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">SMASH is the brainchild of Frieda Kapor Klein and her husband Mitch Kapor, who founded the San Francisco-based nonprofit Level Playing Field Institute in 2001 and its SMASH Academy in 2004. The academy had been based at UC Berkeley for the past seven years before expanding to Stanford last year and will open at UCLA and USC this summer.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">&quot;My parents pushed me all they way through this and really wanted me to go,&quot; said Sanchez, who has never been apart from immediate family for more than a week. &quot;They never had this opportunity back where they grew up, so they wanted me to succeed and do this.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">Sanchez was one of six students from the Livermore school district who applied for the program, which has an application similar to those for most colleges. She had to fill out an application, send in her transcripts, obtain letters of recommendation from teachers, write a personal essay about why she wanted to attend and take a math assessment test.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">She was one of three students from Livermore to make it past the initial phase and was then chosen for an interview before being selected in early May as one of 30 students to attend the Stanford academy.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">One of seven siblings, Sanchez could be the first in her family to go directly to a four-year college. She has two older siblings attending Las Positas College.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">&quot;Our kids are capable and we just have to expose them to opportunities,&quot; said Marta Urrutia, the districts migrant education program recruiter. &quot;We are making progress and growing and more opportunities will be there, and we just have to be ready to take advantage of them.&quot;<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">According to a report by the Level Playing Field Institute, there will be a projected 2.4 million STEM-related job vacancies by 2018. To stay competitive in the global job market, the country needs to provide more opportunities for kids of color to graduate with degrees in science or engineering.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">For Sanchez, science and math are two subjects she said come easy to her, but she had never really thought about majoring in those fields. Livermore school district officials hope this summer will help change her mind.<o:p></o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\" style=\"mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;\ntext-autospace:none\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>\n<p class=\"MsoNormal\"><span style=\"font-family:Arial;mso-bidi-font-family:Arial\">&quot;I think the program is amazing,&quot; Sanchez said. &quot;People don\'t always get this type of opportunity, and when they finally do, those that take advantage of it get so much out of it.&quot;</span></p>\n<!--EndFragment-->\n<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_20787177/livermore-student-hopes-smash-opportunity-gap\">http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_20787177/livermore-student-hopes-smash-opportunity-gap</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"subhead\" style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: 15px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal bold 14px/normal arial; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">State superintendent named new STEM task force chair</span></p>\n<p class=\"bodytext\" style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: 15px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; \">The California STEM Learning Network announced its CEO Chris Roe has been appointed by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson to serve on the newly-created science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) Task Force that will examine how to improve the way California educates its students in these subjects and engage more students in scientific and technical fields, which are integral to the state\'s economic future.</p>\n<p style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: 15px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; \">The task force will explore the status of STEM education in California, including instructional practices, teacher professional development, student testing, infrastructure and partnerships.</p>\n<p style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: 15px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; \">It will also assess the state\'s future needs and recommend a blueprint for improving STEM teaching and learning and providing equal access to STEM learning opportunities for all K-12 students. The blueprint will provide guidance on strategies for including career technical education, and the newly developed national Common Core Standards and Next Generation Science Standards in California\'s K-12 classrooms.</p>\n<p style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: 15px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; \">In California, STEM-related industries and jobs are a major driver of the state\'s economy. Over the last decade, job growth in STEM fields was three times greater than that of non-STEM occupations according to a 2011 U.S. department of commerce study, &quot;STEM: Good Jobs Now and for the Future&quot;. Despite the current high levels of unemployment, Change the Equation reports that in California, there are nearly 1.5 jobs available in STEM fields for every job seeker with a STEM background. California\'s STEM workforce is expected to grow by nearly 20 percent in the next five years alone -- twice the average of other jobs -- with 80 percent of those jobs expected to be in computing and engineering fields. That growth is predicated, however, on having a viable STEM workforce with the skills and abilities needed for success in these careers.</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.mercurynews.com/pacifica/ci_20789597/education-beat\">http://www.mercurynews.com/pacifica/ci_20789597/education-beat</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><span style=\"font-size: x-large; \">CSU Fullerton Receives $1.2M for STEM Programs</span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">The</span></span><span style=\"font-size: small; \">&nbsp;</span><a target=\"_blank\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 66, 118); text-decoration: none; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; \" href=\"http://www.hhmi.org/\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">Howard Hughes Medical Institute</span></a><span style=\"font-size: small; \">, </span><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">one of the largest nonprofit research organizations in the nation, has selected&nbsp;</span></span><a target=\"_blank\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 66, 118); text-decoration: none; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; \" href=\"http://www.fullerton.edu/\"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">Cal State Fullerton</span></span></a><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">&nbsp;to receive a $1.2 million grant to fund the school&rsquo;s ongoing efforts to provide &ldquo;real world research experiences&rdquo; for students in college and high school.&nbsp;<br />\n<br />\n&ldquo;What this grant means is that we will be able to continue reaching students who are thinking of careers in STEM fields and providing them research experiences, even before they come to Cal State Fullerton,&rdquo; said Robert Koch, acting dean of CSU Fullerton&rsquo;s College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.<br />\n<br />\nCSU Fullerton is one of 47 universities to receive a</span></span><span style=\"font-size: small; \">&nbsp;</span><a target=\"_blank\" style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 66, 118); text-decoration: none; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; \" href=\"http://hhmi.fullerton.edu/\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">Howard Hughes Medical Institute</span></a><span style=\"font-size: small; \">&nbsp;</span><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">(HHMI) grant ranging from $800,000 to $1.5 million, and totaling more than $50 million in funds dispersed by the institute. The nonprofit invited 215 colleges and universities to submit proposals for funding focusing on various aspects of science education. Some of the schools awarded funds plan to employ them in improving science-teaching skills among educators, engaging undergraduates in K-12 science outreach programs and activities, and taking on new faculty members to teach in interdisciplinary areas.<br />\n<br />\nCSU Fullerton was granted its award for its commitment to STEM programs &ndash;&ndash; science, technology, engineering and math &ndash;&ndash; aimed at attracting more high school, community college and CSUF students toward these fields of study, according to Maria Linder, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at CSU Fullerton and the recipient of the grant.&nbsp;<br />\n<br />\n&ldquo;The overarching goal is to promote and encourage the flow of undergraduates from our diverse and disadvantaged population into science and math careers as leading researchers and teachers by identifying, developing and preparing those with exceptional potential,&rdquo; said Maria C. Linder, professor of chemistry and biochemistry and recipient of the grant award.<br />\n<br />\nThe real world research experiences funded by this grant allow undergraduates and high school students an opportunity to participate in professional-level research programs.&nbsp;<br />\n<br />\nCSUF first launched the Cal State Fullerton HHMI Research Scholars Program in 2008, with the receipt of an earlier grant award of $1.2 million from HHMI. In its four years, the program has introduced three initiatives to educate, immerse or introduce students to scientific research.&nbsp;<br />\n<br />\nThe Undergraduate Research Scholars Program selects 14 undergraduate Cal State Fullerton students for an intensive 2-year faculty-mentored study program. Local community college students, high school students and math and science teachers are also invited to participate in some aspects of the program as well as grant-funded activities.<br />\n<br />\nThe annual Weekend Research Experience invites community college and high school students and educators to join faculty members in working on a research project, engaging directly with experimental work and aiding in research. The annual Summer Research Experience provides a similar experience for community college and high school students and educators, together with CSUF students; in this program, the groups come together to work on faculty-mentored research over either a 10-week or 5-week session.&nbsp;</span></span></p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.ocmetro.com/t-CSU-Fullerton-receives-1point2-million-grant-for-STEM-programs-06-01-2012.aspx\">http://www.ocmetro.com/t-CSU-Fullerton-receives-1point2-million-grant-for-STEM-programs-06-01-2012.aspx</a></p>\n<hr />\n<h2 style=\"margin-top: 10px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 3px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: bold; font-style: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 1; letter-spacing: -1px; color: rgb(153, 51, 51); text-align: left; \"><span style=\"color: rgb(0, 0, 0); \">Virtual lab initiative wins California networking award</span></h2>\n<div>&nbsp;</div>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Four groundbreaking projects that focus on the innovative use and expansion of high-performance networking have been honored by the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC) as recipients of the 2011 Innovations in Networking Awards.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Awards are presented annually in the categories of Educational, Gigabit/Broadband, High-Performance Research, and Experimental/Developmental Applications. The awards are given annually by CENIC to highlight exemplary innovations that leverage ultra high-bandwidth networking, particularly where those innovations have the potential to revolutionize the ways in which instruction and research are conducted, or in the case of the Gigabit award, where they further the deployment of broadband in underserved areas.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \"><strong>Educational Applications: Virtual Computing Lab Initiative</strong></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Begun as a pilot program at the Cal State East Bay and Northridge campuses, the Virtual Computing Lab (VCL) Initiative allows students to access the software applications their coursework demands from campus, home, or anywhere they have a browser and Internet connectivity. Furthermore, students have this access seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Complex, expensive software can run on the VCL and be accessed via an older PC or a Macintosh since the hardware in the VCL handles the processing.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Faculty use this same infrastructure for high-performance computing for activities and research. This project involved creating a shared VCL cloud (interconnected by CENIC&rsquo;s CalREN network) for students and faculties at multiple CSU institutions.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Thus for all the reasons listed above, the VCL enables significant cost savings and performance increases for the CSU. Complex software need only be installed once and the lab scaled to make it available to users in many locations without duplicating effort. Also, older and legacy equipment can be used to access the Lab. In times when new budget cuts confront California&rsquo;s public education every year, an application that can literally take these crises and turn them into opportunities not only to continue operations in the face of financially difficult times but to actually improve and extend an institution&rsquo;s mission certainly deserves recognition.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \"><strong>Gigabit/Broadband Applications: The Digital 395 Project</strong></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">CENIC has taken the opportunity with its Gigabit/Broadband award to recognize projects that promise to aid in closing the &ldquo;digital divide&rdquo; separating the most connected Californians from their fellow citizens living in un- or underserved areas which are not easily served by the market forces that have provided other areas of the state with top-quality connectivity.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">This year&rsquo;s winner, the California Broadband Cooperative&rsquo;s Digital 395 Middle Mile Project, certainly aims to do a great deal to close that gap in the areas of the state east of the Sierras between Nevada and Barstow along Interstate 395. Much of this region is dependent on decades-old infrastructure and has limited, insufficient broadband middle-mile capabilities, leaving wide swaths of the Central Valley and eastern California underserved. Also, the relative lack of connectivity in the area leaves some sections vulnerable to isolation in case of fiber cuts or other events due to a lack of diverse fiber paths.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">The Project proposes to build a new 553-mile, 10 Gb/s middle-mile fiber network that would mainly follow US Route 395 between southern and northern California. In addition to 36 municipalities, the project&rsquo;s proposed service area encompasses six Indian reservations and two military bases. More than 230 community anchor institutions will be provided access to 10 Mb/s broadband connectivity, with 2.5 Gb/s and higher-capacity fiber-based services offered to the region&rsquo;s last mile providers to expand or enhance service to households and businesses.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \"><strong>High-Performance Research Applications: Tele-Immersion for Physicians</strong></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Another strong &ldquo;killer app&rdquo; for advanced networks is the empowerment of medical professionals to extend their reach to one another and to their patients. UC Berkeley and UC Davis&rsquo;s Tele-Immersion for Physicians promises to use advanced networks to unite medical professionals not only with one another but with their data, so that the interaction between the people can become an interaction via the data in question (imaging data, for example). This brings about faster and more productive collaborations, where doctors can both see the same data at the same time instead of having to rely on individual mental models that may not reconcile with one another. This more fluid means of connecting with colleagues and information will bring about faster and more productive collaborations, where doctors need not rely on individual mental models that may not reconcile with one another.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">This project seeks to unite the Tele-Immersion Lab at UC Berkeley with the W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES) and the Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV), both at UC Davis, and comprises three components currently under development: tele-immersion infrastructure, real-time video capturing systems, and the algorithms needed to capture, visualize, and transmit such data. Successful experiments have been performed, and a proposal has been submitted for a Tele-Immersion node at the UC Davis Medical Center Department of Sports Medicine. Funding has been received from Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) and the National Science Foundation.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \"><strong>Experimental/Developmental Applications: CineGrid@Disney Demonstration</strong></p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">The international collaborative digital and rich media organization CineGrid has been recognized by CENIC in the past for empowering the production, use, preservation, and exchange of very high-quality digital media over photonic networks. This year, the organization is being recognized for multiple demonstrations of remote collaboration for cinema post-production presented to an audience of nearly 100 executives at the Frank G. Wells Theatre on the Disney Studio lot in Burbank, CA.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">The CineGrid@Disney Demonstration on October 13, 2010 was the result of a nine-month effort involving more than 50 participants from seven CineGrid member organizations: Disney Studios, NTT Network Innovation Laboratory, Skywalker Sound, Digital Domain, UCSD/Calit2, UIC/EVL, and Pacific Interface. The challenge was to bring together several different creative workflows, linking multiple remote locations, into a single room using very high-quality media running over high-speed networks for interactive, real-time synchronized &ldquo;live&rdquo; remote collaboration.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">Specific use cases demonstrated included: a 4K/60p telepresence virtual conference room; critical viewing of digitally restored archival film elements at 4K and 2K resolutions, streaming from a remote server; Digital Intermediate (DI) color grading; critical viewing of 3D HD stereoscopic visual effects; collaborative audio editing and mixing; and use of SAGE OptIPortable multi-panel display wall for collaborative review of multimedia marketing materials.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">The Demonstration relied on the active cooperation of five of CineGrid&rsquo;s network members &ndash; CENIC/CalREN, JGN2, GEMnet, PNWGP, and StarLight &ndash; who provided 1GigE and 10GigE connectivity to the geographically separated participants; in addition, the City of Burbank provided critical last-mile connectivity at 10Gb/s from Disney to CalREN, the CineGrid hub in the Los Angeles region.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 15px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 12px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; \">California&rsquo;s education and research communities leverage their networking resources under CENIC in order to obtain cost-effective, high-bandwidth networking to support their missions and answer the needs of their faculty, staff, and students. CENIC designs, implements, and operates CalREN, the California Research and Education Network, a high-bandwidth, high-capacity Internet network specially designed to meet the unique requirements of these communities, and to which the vast majority of the state&rsquo;s K-20 educational institutions are connected. In order to facilitate collaboration in education and research, CENIC also provides connectivity to non-California institutions and industry research organizations with which CENIC&rsquo;s Associate researchers and educators are engaged.</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/virtual-lab-initiative-wins-california-networking-award/?ast=31&amp;astc=2487\">http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/virtual-lab-initiative-wins-california-networking-award/?ast=31&amp;astc=2487</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n<table cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\" class=\"regionParent\" border=\"0\" style=\"width: 1000px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: auto; margin-right: auto; margin-bottom: auto; margin-left: auto; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); \">\n <tbody>\n <tr>\n <td valign=\"top\" class=\"region2\" style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-left: 0px; border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; text-align: left; vertical-align: top; width: 660px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); \">\n <table border=\"0\" width=\"100%\" cellpadding=\"0\" cellspacing=\"0\">\n <tbody>\n <tr>\n <td valign=\"top\">\n <table cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\" border=\"0\" width=\"100%\">\n <tbody>\n <tr>\n <td class=\"articleBox\" style=\"font-family: arial, helvetica, verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-left: 10px; display: block; width: 652px; \">\n <div class=\"hnews hentry item\">\n <h1 id=\"articleTitle\" class=\"articleTitle entry-title\" style=\"font-family: arial, helvetica, verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 18pt; color: rgb(38, 43, 127); font-weight: bold; \">Torrance middle school teacher Kevin Tambara wins Einstein Fellowship</h1>\n </div>\n </td>\n </tr>\n </tbody>\n </table>\n </td>\n </tr>\n </tbody>\n </table>\n </td>\n </tr>\n </tbody>\n</table>\n</p>\n<p>\n<table cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\" class=\"regionParent\" border=\"0\" style=\"width: 1000px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-top: auto; margin-right: auto; margin-bottom: auto; margin-left: auto; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); \">\n <tbody>\n <tr>\n <td valign=\"top\" class=\"region2\" style=\"padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-left: 0px; border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; text-align: left; vertical-align: top; width: 660px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); \">\n <table border=\"0\" width=\"100%\" cellpadding=\"0\" cellspacing=\"0\">\n <tbody>\n <tr>\n <td valign=\"top\">\n <table cellspacing=\"0\" cellpadding=\"0\" border=\"0\" width=\"100%\">\n <tbody>\n <tr>\n <td class=\"articleBox\" style=\"font-family: arial, helvetica, verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; margin-left: 10px; display: block; width: 652px; \">\n <div class=\"hnews hentry item\">\n <div class=\"entry-content\">\n <div id=\"articleBody\" class=\"articleBody\" style=\"font-family: arial, helvetica, verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-weight: normal; \">\n <p>Kevin Tambara, a science teacher at Bert Lynn Middle School in Torrance, is among 19 teachers nationwide to receive the Einstein Fellowship, which offers K-12 teachers in math- and science-related fields an opportunity to serve in the national education public policy arena.</p>\n <p>&nbsp;</p>\n <p>The fellows were selected from a nationwide pool of about 200 applicants.</p>\n <p>&nbsp;</p>\n <p>The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program was authorized by an act of Congress in 1994.</p>\n <p>&nbsp;</p>\n <p>Selected teachers spend a school year in the Washington, D.C., area serving in a federal agency or a congressional office. Fellows provide practical insight and a classroom perspective to policymakers and program managers developing or managing education programs.</p>\n <p>&nbsp;</p>\n <p>The idea is to help policymakers develop good educational programs, particularly in the realm of science, technology, engineering and math - widely referred to as STEM education.&nbsp;</p>\n </div>\n </div>\n </div>\n </td>\n </tr>\n </tbody>\n </table>\n </td>\n </tr>\n </tbody>\n </table>\n </td>\n </tr>\n </tbody>\n</table>\n</p>\n<p>source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.dailybreeze.com/education/ci_20559138/torrance-middle-school-teacher-kevin-tambara-wins-einstein\">http://www.dailybreeze.com/education/ci_20559138/torrance-middle-school-teacher-kevin-tambara-wins-einstein</a></p>\n<hr />\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<h1 style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: normal; font-style: inherit; font-size: 30px; font-family: georgia; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 34px; \">New STEM education alliance to form</h1>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;The Endeavour Institute has received a $50,000 planning grant to form a Central Coast alliance to boost science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM education.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 13px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 18px; \" class=\"rteleft\">The grant came from the California STEM Learning Network.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 13px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 18px; \" class=\"rteleft\">The Central Coast STEM Collaborative will include Cal Poly, UCSB, San Luis Obispo County Office of Education, Hancock College, Santa Barbara County Office of Education, and others.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 13px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 18px; \" class=\"rteleft\">&ldquo;The work carried out by the Central Coast STEM Collaborative will be essential in preparing students to meet our state&rsquo;s expected demand for an additional 1 million STEM-training workers,&rdquo; said Chris Roe, CEO of the California STEM Learning Network.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 13px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 18px; \" class=\"rteleft\">The participants are a network of families, educators, business professionals, colleges and universities invested in STEM education to ensure children pursue high-tech careers, officials said.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 13px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 18px; \" class=\"rteleft\">The Santa Maria Valley-based Endeavour Institute, which formed more than 20 years ago, is a nonprofit organization focused on improving STEM education on the Central Coast.</p>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-size: 13px; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; line-height: 18px; \" class=\"rteleft\">The planning grant begins in June and individuals or organizations interested in participating should contact Steve Kliewer, Endeavour Institute director, at 804-2245.</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://santamariatimes.com/news/local/education/new-stem-education-alliance-to-form/article_8b890288-8057-11e1-9dd6-001a4bcf887a.html\">http://santamariatimes.com/news/local/education/new-stem-education-alliance-to-form/article_8b890288-8057-11e1-9dd6-001a4bcf887a.html</a></p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<hr />\n<h1 style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 2em; font-weight: normal; line-height: 1.2; \" class=\"rteleft\">High-Quality STEM Education for All: It Takes a Village</h1>\n<p style=\"margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; font-size: 1.3em; \" class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<div class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \"><em>Dr. Idit Harel Caperton is the founder of the World Wide Workshop, a nonprofit that has developed a game design curriculum being used in five states.</em></span></div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">Over the last few years we\'ve seen a marked increase in the attention to STEM education, especially at the federal level. President Obama and Secretary Duncan have worked to bring STEM to the forefront of the nation\'s education dialogue as a necessary focus for a successful and competitive future workforce and economic development. They have encouraged growth in STEM learning opportunities with their branded programmatic initiatives like Educate to Innovate and Investing in Innovation. While these national campaigns have shed a much-needed light on the importance of cultivating and spreading STEM education everywhere, it will take many cross-sector partnerships and commitment of multiple players to move from light-shedding into actual implementations of STEM learning opportunities for America\'s 150 million K-16 students.</span></div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">Champions of this work understand how providing highly engaging STEM learning opportunities for youth can increase their future options and success in STEM careers. Moreover, a&nbsp;<a style=\"color: rgb(0, 94, 166); text-decoration: none; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/stem-education/2012/01/20/congressman-proposes-stem-education-office\">recent<em>U.S. News</em>&nbsp;post</a>&nbsp;featured U.S. Congressman Michael Honda (CA-15), Silicon Valley\'s representative, and his introduction of the STEM Education Innovation Act of 2011 in the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill would create an Office of STEM Education in the Department of Education, support state consortia on STEM education to shape best practices, and provide grant funding to organizations to develop educational technology innovations that will unleash the power of STEM education&mdash;building partnerships across sectors to support STEM learning.</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">The need for high-quality learning opportunities is prevalent everywhere&mdash;especially in Representative Honda\'s district. Technology and media companies in Silicon Valley consistently need an educated workforce with strong cognitive capacities and digital skills, such as digital collaboration and critical thinking. They need contributors who have both technical skills and advanced knowledge of science, technology, mathematics, engineering, and design. And they need creative thinkers who can help develop new ideas and invent solutions to future challenges.</span></div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">In response to this challenge, the World Wide Workshop has recently expanded its efforts into Silicon Valley to create high-quality, engaging STEM learning opportunities for youth who live in the back yards of the tech giants. With generous support from the Knight Foundation and Google, and in partnership with the Silicon Valley Education Foundation, the World Wide Workshop is implementing its flagship program, Globaloria (the first and largest social learning network, where students develop STEM knowledge, digital literacies, and global citizenship skills through designing and programming educational webgames).</span></div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">In addition to its programs in West Virginia, Florida, Texas, and New York, the World Wide Workshop is now active in several schools and Boys &amp; Girls Clubs in San Jose and Silicon Valley. Over the next two years, the program will expand to serve 3,000 students in the region, and the partnerships that the World Wide Workshop has formed with public schools, private and corporate foundations, and community partners will make it possible to give these learners access to high-quality STEM education.</span></div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: small; \">At an upcoming STEM Salon with Change the Equation, a CEO-led&nbsp;</span><span style=\"font-size: small; \"><a class=\"kLink\" id=\"KonaLink0\" style=\"color: rgb(0, 84, 151) !important; text-decoration: underline !important; cursor: pointer; font-family: inherit !important; border-top-width: 0px !important; border-right-width: 0px !important; border-bottom-width: 0px !important; border-left-width: 0px !important; border-top-style: none !important; border-right-style: none !important; border-bottom-style: none !important; border-left-style: none !important; border-top-color: transparent !important; border-right-color: transparent !important; border-bottom-color: transparent !important; border-left-color: transparent !important; background-image: none !important; background-attachment: initial !important; background-origin: initial !important; background-clip: initial !important; background-color: transparent !important; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-right: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 0px !important; text-transform: none !important; display: inline !important; font-variant: normal; top: 0px; right: 0px; bottom: 0px; left: 0px; outline-style: none; outline-width: initial; outline-color: initial; position: static; font-weight: inherit !important; font-size: inherit !important; background-position: initial initial !important; background-repeat: initial initial !important; \" href=\"http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/stem-education/2012/03/19/high-quality-stem-education-for-all-it-takes-a-village#\"><font color=\"#005497\" style=\"color: rgb(0, 84, 151) !important; font-family: inherit !important; font-weight: inherit !important; font-size: inherit !important; position: static; \"><span class=\"kLink\" style=\"border-top-width: 0px !important; border-top-style: none !important; border-top-color: initial !important; border-left-width: 0px !important; border-left-style: none !important; border-left-color: initial !important; border-right-width: 0px !important; border-right-style: none !important; border-right-color: initial !important; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: rgb(0, 84, 151); padding-top: 0px !important; padding-right: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 1px !important; padding-left: 0px !important; color: rgb(0, 84, 151) !important; background-image: none; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; width: auto !important; float: none !important; display: inline !important; font-family: inherit !important; font-weight: inherit !important; position: static; \">nonprofit&nbsp;</span><span class=\"kLink\" style=\"border-top-width: 0px !important; border-top-style: none !important; border-top-color: initial !important; border-left-width: 0px !important; border-left-style: none !important; border-left-color: initial !important; border-right-width: 0px !important; border-right-style: none !important; border-right-color: initial !important; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: rgb(0, 84, 151); padding-top: 0px !important; padding-right: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 1px !important; padding-left: 0px !important; color: rgb(0, 84, 151) !important; background-image: none; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; width: auto !important; float: none !important; display: inline !important; font-family: inherit !important; font-weight: inherit !important; position: static; \">organization</span></font></a>&nbsp;dedicated to mobilizing the business community to improve the quality of STEM education in the United States, Representative Honda, along with Chris Roe of the CA STEM Learning Network, will continue to champion this cause and discuss how public-private partnerships are necessary to for creating and influencing opportunities for STEM learning. The World Wide Workshop is cheering its California STEM partners on as they sharing the vital message of how leaders and organizations&mdash;from national to local levels, and across sectors&mdash;must come together to reshape the future of STEM learning to secure America\'s place in the global economy.</span></div>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</div>\n<div class=\"rteleft\">source:&nbsp;<a href=\"http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/stem-education/2012/03/19/high-quality-stem-education-for-all-it-takes-a-village \">http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/stem-education/2012/03/19/high-quality-stem-education-for-all-it-takes-a-village</a></div>\n<hr />\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\"><span style=\"font-size: larger;\"><strong>Community advisers sought in tech education</strong></span></p>\n<div style=\"border: medium none ; overflow: hidden; text-align: left; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-decoration: none;\">\n<div id=\"story_text_top\">\n<p class=\"rteleft\">Woodland Joint Unified School District officials are looking for community members to help advise its career technical education department.</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">The advisory committee works with instructors and students to help ensure that curriculum and skills match the needs of industry and business, according to a news release from the district.</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">Advisory committee members are needed in the following areas: agriculture; business and computer science; health and home economics; and industrial technology.</p>\n</div>\n<div id=\"story_bug\">\n<div style=\"border: medium none ; overflow: hidden; text-align: left; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-decoration: none;\" class=\"rteleft\">For more information,please contact Gayelynn Gerhart at (530) 406-3260. <br />\n<br />\n&nbsp;</div>\n</div>\n<p class=\"rteleft\"><br />\n<br />\n&nbsp;</p>\n</div>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\"><font size=\"3\"><font face=\"Times New Roman\">Dr. Patrick Ainsworth, Assistant Superintendent<br />\nSecondary, Postsecondary &amp; Adult Education, California Department of Education<br />\n1430 N. Street, Suite 4503<br />\nSacramento, CA 95814<br />\n<script type=\"text/javascript\">\neval(decodeURIComponent(\'%64%6f%63%75%6d%65%6e%74%2e%77%72%69%74%65%28%27%3c%61%20%68%72%65%66%3d%22%6d%61%69%6c%74%6f%3a%70%61%69%6e%73%77%6f%72%40%63%64%65%2e%63%61%2e%67%6f%76%22%3e%70%61%69%6e%73%77%6f%72%40%63%64%65%2e%63%61%2e%67%6f%76%3c%2f%61%3e%27%29%3b\'))\n</script> </font></font><a href=\"mailto:painswor@cde.ca.gov\"><u><font size=\"3\" face=\"Times New Roman\">painswor@cde.ca.gov</font></u></a><font size=\"3\" face=\"Times New Roman\"> </font></p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>\n<p class=\"rteleft\">&nbsp;</p>', created = 1516438408, expire = 1516524808, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '3:a3acd6cea017ca57ee74cd61cd915bcf' in /home/apluss5/public_html/techedmagazine.com/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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UCR professors honored with STEM award

At their third-annual summit, the California STEM Learning network honored two female UCR professors and 10 other women with the “Leading Women in STEM” statewide award.

Held on Oct. 15 and 16, the two-day conference on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) took place in San Diego, with the attendance of over 350 researchers, educators, policymakers and entrepreneurs. The summit focused on creating new partnerships that would bring more innovative ways in terms of how STEM education is taught, learned and applied.

“The synergy of participants and their total commitment to STEM was amazing,” said Dr. Pamela Clute, UC Riverside’s assistant vice chancellor of educational and community engagement, executive director of the ALPHA Center and lecturer in math. In an interview with the Highlander, she said the summit gave useful insight on the innovative ways in which teachers could educate students.

Dr. Clute was one of the speakers at the summit as well as a recipient of the “Leading Women in STEM” award. The award is presented to those who have shown leadership in advancing critical areas of STEM education, including adoption of NEXT Generation Science Standards and advocating for strengthened public-private partnerships and alignment of resources.

“That validation of our work makes us want to do more… Teachers do change futures and they do change lives because they provide the inspiration that young people need,” Dr. Clute said.

Susan Hackwood, the executive director of the California Council on Science and Technology and professor at UC Riverside also received the award. Dr. Hackwood is the founding dean of UCR’s Bourns College of Engineering and she has overseen the development of all research and teaching aspects of five degree programs.

California is currently ranked 43rd in the nation in undergraduate math and science proficiency. According to the Department of Labor, the fastest growing and best paying occupations are in medicine, engineering, computer science, energy/environment and data communication. Out of these jobs, 63 percent require STEM knowledge and 92 percent require post secondary education.

“Right now, STEM education is absolutely necessary for a vibrant economy and we need to educate the next generation in these fields,” said Dr. Clute.
Her presentation at the summit, “Why STEM, Why Partnership,” was centered on the grounds of building a partnership between education, businesses, government, media, and faith-based groups to work towards improving STEM education. “This is about community and working towards the same goal,” she said.

Chris Roe, the CEO of California STEM Learning Network, said in a recent Press-Enterprise article that adjustments coming to the state’s educational curriculum will bring changes in the way STEM education has been taught by both new and veteran teachers.
Other speakers at the summit included State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, ambassador for California’s STEM school program and basketball champion Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and scientists from NASA, Google and Pixar.

 

source: http://www.highlandernews.org/4971/ucr-professors-honored-with-stem-award/


Los Gatos High School's hands-on science class a boost to STEM efforts

Cathy Messenger has long understood that the best way to teach kids science is to show them what the discipline's complicated formulas and physics are good for.

So when the Los Gatos High School chemistry teacher heard there was private grant money available to launch the sort of advanced research class that she'd been thinking about for years, she jumped at it. Now she presides over a classroom of 21 students working on everything from sending water samples to space to reversing benzene contamination of soil with phanerochaete chrysosporium.

Yes, phanerochaete chrysosporium.

"You learn the content and it means something," Messenger says of her class where students were recently typing on laptops, mixing solutions and discussing findings with each other. "It's about the experience. When do you retain information the most? When you've learned something that you have to immediately put to use."

I first heard from Messenger about her Advanced Science Research class last summer. I had just written about the Google (GOOG) Science Fair and said that I intended to write more columns about ideas that can help spark students' interest in science, technology, engineering and math. It turns out that Sabera Talukder, one of the Google finalists, had taken Messenger's class last year, the

first year she offered it.

 

Messenger told me that Talukder came up with a low-cost way to purify water in developing countries when Talukder's passion and curiosity intersected with the mentoring and resources provided in the advanced research class. And it all made so much sense to me. Silicon Valley employers and educators for years have been worrying about where the next generation of technologists is coming from. Students -- especially girls -- seem to fall away from math, science and technical fields in middle school and high school. By college, the brightest are headed for business, finance, Wall Street and the big bucks.

 

But maybe a high school course in which kids think for themselves, push themselves and confront real-world problems, is the sort of thing that can flip a switch.

 

"I feel just so lucky to have this class," says Talukder, 16, who's back this year working on prototypes of her purification system, which she hopes to deploy in Bangladesh this winter. "It's given me a sense of purpose: How can I affect and how can I change the world?"

 

And as Talukder struggles with raising money to build her prototypes, it's given her a real-world lesson on how difficult it can be to bring about change.

 

"Actually, I found out that the hardest thing about science is not the research," she says. "It's implementing it."

 

The research class seems like a no-brainer, but in a world where standardize tests rule and school budgets are stretched to the breaking point, such elective classes are something of a luxury. The work Messenger's students are doing doesn't directly line up with test questions. And projects that involve growing plants on the ocean's surface, testing the toxicity of cadmium chloride and analyzing water's properties in microgravity cost money.

 

Messenger, a biochemist who worked for years in medical diagnostics research, is resourceful. She's recruited her husband, an electrical engineer, and another parent, who is a mechanical engineer, to help mentor students. The grant she landed provides funding for up to three more years, including $5,000 a year for supplies. (It also comes with the condition that the donor remain anonymous.) And Messenger has joined with Valley Christian Schools on a project to send a team experiment to the International Space Station in March.

 

It's a shame that innovative programs like Messenger's are so random and so fragile. Teachers and schools need to get lucky; to find a grant here, a volunteer mentor there. And when the current grant expires, Messenger isn't quite sure how she will pay to continue the class.

 

"It's always been my passion," she says of the research-based class. "It's part of why I became a teacher."

 

And clearly the passion is contagious. In Messenger's class one recent afternoon, students talked about the practical implications of their research. Andrea Kibel, a junior, is exploring the idea of growing food on the oceans' surface. She says she was inspired by similar projects launched on inland lakes.

 

"There is so much ocean surface available compared to fresh water," she says.

 

Sophomore Eugenia Huang has embraced the independent nature of the research class. A few weeks into the school year, she switched her focus from pyrolysis (heating biowaste to create fuel) to working on benzene with phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white fungus. The fuel idea, she explains, would have required purchasing a $12,000 furnace or building one that would burn at 800 degrees.

 

"We were just afraid that it would blow up," she says.

 

But the discovery by doing, or even discovering what you can't yet do, is part of the joy of science -- a joy that seems to be warmly embraced by the researchers in Cathy Messenger's classroom.

 

 

source: http://www.marinij.com/ci_21957501/cassidy-los-gatos-high-school-cathy-messenger-stem-science-class


CSUDH program turns out more math and science teachers than any other CSU campus

Cal Poly is renowned within the California State University system for its applied-science programs. Humboldt State is known for its forestry. Perhaps it's time that California State University, Dominguez Hills, in Carson gains a reputation as the CSU system's leading producer of math and science teachers.

Half a decade ago, in response to lagging student achievement in math and science, then CSU Chancellor Charles Reed challenged all 22 campuses to double their output of teachers in those subjects.

As a whole, the system met its five-year goal. But no campus had more success than Dominguez Hills.

In the five years after Reed made his pledge in 2006-07, Dominguez Hills - one of the smaller campuses in the CSU network - churned out 620 math and science teachers, according to data from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. That's the highest number of all the schools.

The Carson campus has a close runner-up in the much larger California State University, Long Beach, which produced 601 such teachers in the five years ending in 2010-11, the latest available data. But after that the competition isn't even close: Northridge, the next runner-up, produced 479. The output of the other campuses ranged from 79 to 478.

"Allow me to brag," said Kamal Hamdan, an education professor and the project director for Cal State Dominguez Hills' Math and Science Teacher Initiatives. "This is really a source of pride for us, as we are a small campus."

The impressive numbers at Dominguez Hills stem largely from Hamdan's program, which sweetens the deal for those interested in becoming K-12 math and science teachers. Many of the incentives come from several pots of state and federal money, countering the unfortunate trends of skyrocketing tuition and student debt.

 

Perks include waiving the college debt for any newly minted teacher who dedicates four years to an inner-city school; a $10,000-a-year salary bonus

program for such teachers who stick around for longer than four years at a high-need school and agree to mentor other teachers; stipends for new classroom teachers to purchase calculators, pencils and other supplies; and a fast-track program allowing holders of bachelor degrees to become full-on classroom teachers in a matter of months.

 

Not just anyone can qualify; students must meet at least one of several criteria. One is to be a midcareer professional with substantial experience in math and science - perhaps an engineer at the Boeing Co. or Lockheed Corp. who is looking for a change. A qualified applicant could also be a college graduate with a math or science degree. Or someone with experience as a teachers aide or paraprofessional.

 

All applicants must finish with a decent GPA, demonstrate proficiency on exams and, perhaps most importantly, agree to teach in a disadvantaged urban setting.

 

Another recommended qualification is a love of teaching. Many midcareer professionals who graduate from the program - known as Transition to Teaching - take a hefty pay cut.

 

Such was the case for Daisy Lee, a math teacher and teacher coach at Banning High in Wilmington who, as one of the program's first graduates in 2001, discovered that the roughly $60,000 she earned as a litigation secretary had been knocked down to about $34,000.

 

"That was a bigger shock than the kids," she said.

 

Not that going from the office environment to a room filled with teenagers was seamless. Lee wasn't quite prepared for the physicality of the job, for instance.

"I always tease Dr. Hamdan (by telling him), `You should have told us to buy a good pair of shoes,"' she said.

 

She also remembers students tossing litter on the floor of the classroom, ignoring the nearby trash cans.

 

"It was a shock, but I had no problem asking them to pick it up," she said. "Once I did, they did. They just needed someone to point it out to them."

 

Lee, 44, quickly acclimated to the job. Wherever she goes, math scores tend to improve. This has happened at both Narbonne and Gardena high schools, whose scores both went from dismal to much better during her stay. Now she's hoping for similar results at Banning.

 

"I want kids to understand math is fun," she said. "You just need teachers who are fun."

 

A more recent product of the Dominguez Hills program is 23-year-old Sarah Kwon.

 

Like many college students, Kwon, a San Pedro native, racked up $25,000 in student debt at the University of California at Berkeley, where she'd earned a science degree. Because she made a commitment through the Dominguez Hills program to stay at Wilmington Middle School for at least four years, all but $2,000 of those loans will be forgiven.

 

Naturally, that was a huge enticement. So was the speed of the program: Within three months of enrolling, she was in the classroom, earning a paycheck. (Kwon spent a year teaching by day and taking classes toward her credential by night.)

 

The program also gave her a $150 gift card to purchase materials for her middle school classroom, such as calculators, pencils and flash drives.

 

"One of the best things about TTT (Transition to Teaching) is they are so well-funded," she said. "There's just so much money that they throw at us. ... It's almost ridiculous."

 

The program seems to have achieved its objective with respect to Kwon, a lifelong science buff who has no intention of leaving the profession after her four years are up.

 

"I think I will stick around," she said. "I like it."

 

 

source: http://www.dailybreeze.com/education/ci_21976989/csudh-program-turns-out-more-math-and-science


Colfax High School Students Receive MIT Invention Grant

Jonathan Schwartz, Colfax math and engineering teacher is mentoring the team.  "This opportunity builds on the Career Technical Education program we've expanded at Colfax High School with the support of the Sierra College Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) Collaborative," said Schwartz. We focus on product development to attract students to STEM careers.

InvenTeams of high school students, teachers and mentors receive grants to invent technological solutions to real-world problems and to inspire a new generation of inventors.

"The InvenTeams program represents the future," said Leigh Estabrooks, invention education officer from the Lemelson-MIT Program.  "We place an emphasis on STEM-focused projects to develop interest in these fields among youth.  With InvenTeams, our primary goal is to foster high school students' passion for invention, in turn inspiring them to consider careers in science, technology, engineering or math."

The Colfax students will invent a Tri-Metric tool that can be used when building emergency housing. The goal is to make it easier to lay-out a house. It would allow novice builders to make sure the floor, walls and roof are all square, maximizing support to make the home sturdy.  The students hope to design the mechanical device so it can be manufactured for under $20. The idea is to build in all the complex math of trigonometry into the tool so it can be used by anyone.

"Not only will it help with construction and address a need in relief efforts," said Schwartz. "More importantly, there will an educational component in this invention that teaches the math involved in constructing a house."

Carol Pepper-Kittredge, Director, Center for Applied Competitive Technologies (CACT), Sierra College will mentor the team. "This project is an extension of the leadership Jonathan Schwartz and Colfax High School have demonstrated as participants in CACT's Sierra STEM Collaborative," said Pepper-Kittredge. "By applying their design, fabrication and math skills to solve a global problem, students, especially young women, will be inspired to consider technical careers."

Entrepreneur and author Peter Sims, who wrote Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries and coauthored the best-seller True North: Discover Your Authentic Leadership with Bill George will also mentor the team. A Colfax High School graduate, Sims has already met with students and inspired them with tales of how industry leaders innovate and produce new products.

Schwartz, himself an inventor, says that students will experience working on a team and applying critical thinking skills. "They will design, and repeatedly prototype, test, and rebuild the Tri-Metric construction tool over nine months. They will go through the same experience that inventors go through," said Schwartz. "In June, the students will showcase a prototype of their invention at EurekaFest at MIT in Cambridge, MA." EurekaFest, presented by the Lemelson-MIT Program, is a multi-day celebration designed to empower a legacy of inventors through activities that inspire youth, honor role models and encourage creativity and problem solving.

For more information, contact Jonathan Schwartz, Colfax High School at 530-346-2284 x 2408 or jschwart@puhsd.k12.ca.us.

ABOUT THE LEMELSON-MIT PROGRAM
Celebrating innovation, inspiring youth
The Lemelson-MIT Program celebrates outstanding innovators and inspires young people to pursue creative lives and careers through invention. Jerome H. Lemelson, one of U.S. history's most prolific inventors, and his wife Dorothy founded the Lemelson-MIT Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994. It is funded by The Lemelson Foundation and administered by the School of Engineering. The Foundation sparks, sustains and celebrates innovation and the inventive spirit. It supports projects in the U.S. and developing countries that nurture innovators and unleash invention to advance economic, social and environmentally sustainable development. To date The Lemelson Foundation has donated or committed more than U.S. $150 million in support of its mission. http://web.mit.edu/invent/

 

source: http://www.rocklintoday.com/news/templates/community_news.asp?articleid=11095&zoneid=4


LAUSD unveils state-of-the-art science center named for astronaut Sally Ride

L.A. Unified unveiled a state-of-the-art science facility in Glassell Park Monday that bears the name of the late astronaut Sally Ride, in hopes of inspiring a new generation of students to pursue careers in math and science.

The Sally Ride Center for Environmental Science is a $4.8 million LEED-certified facility that sits behind the Sonia M. Sotomayor Learning Academies. The 6,000 square foot facility, less than a mile from the L.A. River, includes three state-of-the-art labs that will focus on areas such as hydrology and energy. The labs have high-tech, professional grade equipment, including a photovoltaic demonstration system, a PH water lab, a centrifuge, and field spectrometers.

The site will be used not only as a hands-on science lab for students who will conduct water and soil testing and energy conservation research, but also to train teachers. 

Sally Ride's mother and sister were at Monday's ceremony.

"This is the sort of thing that Sally would have been absolutely delighted about," said her sister, Bear Ride. Sally Ride was an L.A. Unified alum who attended Encino Elementary School and Portola Junior High School.

Bear Ride said her sister had been deeply influenced by her math and science teachers.

"In fact, all the astronauts I know tell stories about their teachers pushing in the old black and white TV sets to watch John Glenn being launched into space, and it was those teachers who really caught the imagination of kids," Ride said.

They "learned, if you're curious about how stuff works or why things happen, science is the way to go. There are different ways to get at that, but I think curiosity is the way to do it, hands on stuff. And this is what this center's all about," said Ride.

The facility was built and equipped primarily by a state grant to support career technical education, said L.A. Unified Board member Bennett Kayser. The facility will likely not open to all students until next fall, as the district needs more time to hire a director, sort out scheduling issues, and seek out partners for long-term funding.

In the meantime, the center is being used to train teachers, and for some experiments with students from the L.A. River School, a new pilot school. Kayser said students will be doing research that complements work done by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

L.A. Unified has two other similar outdoor classroom programs, including Clear Creek near Mt. Wilson, which is located near the headwaters of the L.A. River, and Point Fermin in the San Pedro area, located at the mouth of the river, Kayser said. "Here we are, right in the center of those two sites. We should be able to do some very interesting research."

Sally Ride was the first American woman to fly in space and youngest U.S. astronaut in 1983. The then-32-year-old physicist and science writer was an inspiration to many women who considered pursuing careers in science and engineering. Ride, who died earlier this year, passionately championed efforts to involve young people, and especially girls, in the sciences.

L.A. Unified officials hope the center will serve as a hub for students at many schools in the area. The district has about 100 campuses that are less than a mile from the L.A. River, Kayser said. 

Christopher Bibelheimer, 14, and his mom Becky showed up at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. The Mt. Gleason Middle School eighth-grader, who has cerebral palsy, hopes he'll be able to make use of the facility. He says the center sounds "cool" because "you're not in a book, having someone lecture at you...The fact that I get to go out and do something, that's what I like."

Democratic Assemblyman Gil Cedillo of Los Angeles urged dozens of students present at Monday's ceremony to embrace their inner nerd.

"Science is cool. It's hip. It's what's happening," Cedillo said. "Be a nerd. Own it. Be proud of it. There you go" — he said to titters in the crowd — "OK, if you're a nerd, raise your hand. If you like science and homework."

A few raised their hands.

"If you like your computer, you like your smart phone, if you like all those things."

More hands went up.

"Own it. I'm proud of you. If you're a nerd, like it. Own it."

 

source: http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2012/10/29/10767/lausd-unveils-state-art-science-center-named-astro/


Channel Islands Staffer Honored as a 'Leading Woman in STEM'

Sandy Birmingham, a STEM Pipeline and Outreach Coordinator for Project ACCESO at California State University Channel Islands (CI), has been named a “Leading Woman in STEM” for her work to advance science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.

Birmingham was one of 12 California women honored at the 2012 California STEM Summit held in San Diego Oct. 16. The award, presented by the nonprofit California STEM Learning Network (CSLNet), recognizes “achievements in advancing innovative and effective STEM education initiatives across the state and serving as exemplary role models for California women and girls.”

The organization honored Birmingham for her work creating high-quality, hands-on afterschool STEM programs. As Pipeline and Outreach Coordinator at CI’s Project ACCESO, she works with area K-12 schools, community colleges, CI faculty and undergraduates, and employers on programs and partnerships to excite students about STEM learning and careers.

“It’s not just an interest to me. It’s a national priority,” she said. “STEM yields innovation and the careers of the future.”

Birmingham has been a history teacher, a Spanish teacher, and more recently served as a program director for Moving Beyond the Bell Afterschool Programs, where she was honored for helping structure innovative afterschool STEM programs in the Sierra Sands Unified School District, partnering with the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division and other local employers.

The “Leading Woman” recognition took Birmingham by surprise. She shared the honor with 11 other prominent women from across the state, including a California Assemblywoman, a National Science Foundation grant-awarded physicist, the Chancellor of UC Davis, and Dr. Joan Bissell, Director of Teacher Education and Public School Programs for the CSU system.

“I was so humbled to be standing alongside these accomplished women,” Birmingham said. “To share that honor with them was a huge highlight in my career.”

CSLNet created the “Leading Women in STEM” awards to help highlight the dramatic need to increase the number of women in STEM fields and recognize women leaders who are making a difference. Currently, only 25 percent of STEM jobs in the U.S. are held by women.

At CI, Birmingham works with Project ACCESO Director Professor Phil Hampton on multiple initiatives that stimulate interest in STEM learning and careers among students in kindergarten through college. In addition to developing afterschool programs, she coaches CI students on how to create and execute project-based lesson plans; oversees mentoring programs; helps organize the Science Carnival, school science nights and other community events; and reaches out to create new partnerships with regional schools and employers.

Birmingham serves as a member of the California After School Network’s Leadership Team, STEM Committee and Nominating Committee, and as an ambassador emeritus for the Afterschool Alliance. She graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles with a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Master of Arts in Education from Azusa Pacific University as well as a teaching credential.

In addition to receiving her award at the STEM Summit, Birmingham and a former colleague gave a presentation on systematic approaches to making STEM partnerships successful.

She gave her award – an engraved glass statue – to her father.

“My dad raised me and worked three jobs so I could get an education and go to college,” she said. “Any time I have the opportunity, I want to honor him.”

 

source: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/29/ci-staffer-honored-as-a-leading-woman-in-stem-6178/


UC Davis chancellor a 'Woman of Stem'

UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi is among a dozen "Leading Women in STEM" recognized Tuesday at the 2012 California STEM Summit in San Diego.

 

The awards recognize honorees for their achievements in advancing innovative and effective STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education initiatives across the state, and for being exemplary role models for California women and girls.

 

Katehi is an electrical engineer by training, with 19 U.S. patents in her name. At UC Davis, she holds joint appointments in the departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Women and Gender Studies. She has been a member of numerous national boards and advisory committees on science, engineering and education, including serving as chair of the National Academy of Engineering's Committee on K-12 Engineering education from 2007 to 2009.

 

Since her early years as a faculty member, Katehi has focused on expanding research opportunities for undergraduates and improving the education and professional experience of graduate students, especially from underrepresented groups. She has mentored more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, doctoral and master's students in electrical and computer engineering.

 

This fall Katehi was awarded a grant of nearly $4 million by the National Science Foundation for a program aimed at increasing the participation of women, especially Latinas, in academic STEM careers.

 

"For our economy to thrive in the future, we need more young women,

as well as young men, to have opportunities to study science, engineering and mathematics and pursue careers in these areas," Katehi said. "The California STEM Learning Network is a leader in advancing STEM education, and I am honored to receive this award."

 

The California STEM Summit brings together business, government, education, nonprofit and philanthropic luminaries to spark change in STEM education and workforce development, as well as to launch new STEM education initiatives.

 

Recognizing the dramatic need for increased numbers of women in STEM fields -- only 25 percent of STEM jobs in the United States today are held by women -- the California STEM Learning Network is highlighting accomplished women STEM leaders and supporting initiatives across California to bolster STEM education for female students, noting that women with STEM jobs earn 33 percent more than comparable women in non-STEM jobs.

 

"The California STEM Learning Network is proud to honor these highly accomplished education, industry, nonprofit and civic leaders for their innovative and successful efforts to create world-class STEM education across California," said Chris Roe, California STEM Learning Network CEO. "Their leadership will ensure that our next generation of leaders is truly reflective of the great diversity and talent that we have in our state."

 

The honorees, in addition to Katehi, are: Joan Bissell, California State University Chancellor's Office; Sandra Birmingham, CSU Channel Islands; Rachel Bondi, Creative Artists Agency; Assemblymember Susan Bonilla (CA-11); Pamela Clute, UC Riverside; Judy D'Amico, Project Lead the Way; Dawn Garrett, Raytheon; Susan Hackwood, California Council on Science and Technology; Helen Quinn, Stanford University; Carol Tang, Coalition for Science After School; and Nancy Taylor, San Diego Science Alliance.

 

The California STEM Learning Network is working to bring systemic change to how STEM is taught and learned in the state in order to prepare the nation's most STEM-capable graduates. Established as a nonprofit in 2010, CSLNet brings together stakeholders from K-12, higher education, business and industry, governmental agencies, community-based organizations and philanthropies.

 

Through this cross-sector collaboration, the network fosters innovation and helps to scale and sustain effective STEM teaching and learning in and out of school for all students.


 

 

source: http://www.dailydemocrat.com/news/ci_21790199/uc-davis-chancellor-woman-stem


STEM Conference for Girls Accepting Participants

Ventura-based education firm Upper Hand to College will host a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) conference for girls in grades 6-12 on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 8:30 a.m.to 3:30 p.m. at the UCSB campus. The conference will offer a fun, inspiring and motivational day, geared toward increasing the number of women in STEM fields. The conference features keynote speaker Dr. Anita Sengupta, a NASA scientist who worked on the Mars Curiosity Rover.

Few girls are pursuing careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields. A recent Girl Scout Research Institute study found that 17 percent of high school girls are interested in STEM fields, yet women account for only 20 percent of the bachelor’s degrees in engineering, computer science and physics. Furthermore, while women make up nearly 50 percent of the U.S. workforce, they hold less than 25 percent of the jobs in STEM.

“We want to help increase the number of women seeking careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields,” said Naiyma Houston, Founder and Director of Upper Hand to College. “We invite all girls, grades 6-12, to join us for this inspiring and fun-filled day to learn about the variety of career opportunities in STEM fields and meet and connect with female role models.”

Girls attending the conference will:

Engage in hands-on activities and seminars

Become aware of the wide variety of career opportunities in technology, science and engineering

Gain a new enthusiasm for STEM

Meet and connect with awesome female role models

Learn the importance of taking classes in science, math and technology in middle school and high school

Leave with the knowledge and understanding that women have the capability to be successful in the professions of science, technology and engineering

Each student will attend two workshops of their choice. Workshops include: Make Your Own Lip Balm; Build a Water Filter; Fun with Polymers; Create a Prosthetic Hand Model; Create Your Own Hand Sanitizer; Challenge Your Design Skills; Hair Dryer Dissection; Design a Hot Air Balloon; Aquarium Visit; and Campus Tour of UCSB. A description of each workshop is available on the conference registration form.

Upon completion of the day’s workshops, participants will earn a Certificate of Participation from the 2012 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Conference.

The conference will also feature a separate track of workshops for parents, teachers and counselors where participants will learn why a STEM education is especially valuable for girls and how to best prepare girls for a STEM education in high school and college. Parents have the opportunity to participate in a Parent Academic Coaching session with Robin McDougal, M.Ed, author of The Pearl Project, and What Color is Your Thinking?

To register for the conference, visit http://conta.cc/QeTezE or call (805) 984-2656. The cost to register for students is $20; and $25 for Parents, Teachers, and Counselors.

 

source: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/28/science-technology-engineering-and-math-stem-confe/


UCR professors honored with STEM award

At their third-annual summit, the California STEM Learning network honored two female UCR professors and 10 other women with the “Leading Women in STEM” statewide award.

Held on Oct. 15 and 16, the two-day conference on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) took place in San Diego, with the attendance of over 350 researchers, educators, policymakers and entrepreneurs. The summit focused on creating new partnerships that would bring more innovative ways in terms of how STEM education is taught, learned and applied.

“The synergy of participants and their total commitment to STEM was amazing,” said Dr. Pamela Clute, UC Riverside’s assistant vice chancellor of educational and community engagement, executive director of the ALPHA Center and lecturer in math. In an interview with the Highlander, she said the summit gave useful insight on the innovative ways in which teachers could educate students.

Dr. Clute was one of the speakers at the summit as well as a recipient of the “Leading Women in STEM” award. The award is presented to those who have shown leadership in advancing critical areas of STEM education, including adoption of NEXT Generation Science Standards and advocating for strengthened public-private partnerships and alignment of resources.

“That validation of our work makes us want to do more… Teachers do change futures and they do change lives because they provide the inspiration that young people need,” Dr. Clute said.

Susan Hackwood, the executive director of the California Council on Science and Technology and professor at UC Riverside also received the award. Dr. Hackwood is the founding dean of UCR’s Bourns College of Engineering and she has overseen the development of all research and teaching aspects of five degree programs.

California is currently ranked 43rd in the nation in undergraduate math and science proficiency. According to the Department of Labor, the fastest growing and best paying occupations are in medicine, engineering, computer science, energy/environment and data communication. Out of these jobs, 63 percent require STEM knowledge and 92 percent require post secondary education.

“Right now, STEM education is absolutely necessary for a vibrant economy and we need to educate the next generation in these fields,” said Dr. Clute.
Her presentation at the summit, “Why STEM, Why Partnership,” was centered on the grounds of building a partnership between education, businesses, government, media, and faith-based groups to work towards improving STEM education. “This is about community and working towards the same goal,” she said.

Chris Roe, the CEO of California STEM Learning Network, said in a recent Press-Enterprise article that adjustments coming to the state’s educational curriculum will bring changes in the way STEM education has been taught by both new and veteran teachers.
Other speakers at the summit included State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, ambassador for California’s STEM school program and basketball champion Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and scientists from NASA, Google and Pixar.

 

 

source: http://www.highlandernews.org/4971/ucr-professors-honored-with-stem-award/


Underserved LA youth completes first ever STEM summer program at SIPA

Search to Involve Pilipino Americans (SIPA) held a special ceremony on October 25 to celebrate the successful completion of the first-ever Summer Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM) Exploration program. The STEM program, a joint venture between SIPA and Verizon, was a means for underserved Los Angeles youth to be exposed to fields of study which the organizers believe to be important for success in the 21st century.

A total of 40 students participated in the 10-week course which included classroom instruction, applied projects, individual and team competitions, and educational exposure trips. In the educational trips, participants were able to visit local museums and landmarks such as the California Science Center, Peterson Auto Museum, and the Port of Los Angeles.

Among those who completed the program, only 26 attended the ceremony because other students were only in LA for the summer, and had to return to their hometowns when the school year began.

According to Dennis Arguelles, SIPA Director of Programs, the program sought to “build a sense of appreciation” in the students for science, technology, engineering and mathematics; and to “expose the youth to possible careers in these fields.”

Arguelles cited a report by the US Department of Education that noted how the US has lagged behind in global rankings for education in the past few years.

“We want to prepare our kids for performing at a high level at the global economy, not just the US economy,” Arguelles explained, “And we believe that studying these fields is vital to achieving success in the global economy.”

Arguelles also expressed his gratitude for the financial grant from Verizon, which was used primarily to conduct the first-ever STEM program by SIPA.  Arguelles said that thanks to Verizon’s funding, SIPA was able to develop a curriculum that worked best towards their primary objective of catalyzing interest in the youth in STEM subjects.

“We were able to experiment and see what works best for our curriculum, and we were able to formalize the foundations of the program,” said Arguelles.

“SIPA is very happy to be able to contribute to the future of these children,” Arguelles added.

Thanks to the class projects and educational trips, SIPA was able to give valuable STEM exposure to children coming from families with limited financial wherewithal.  The creative approach in the program allowed for interesting and engaging discussions that got the students excited for future STEM careers.

Noah Jeremiah, an 8th grader who delivered a testimonial at the completion ceremony, said that he particularly enjoyed the project that required them to construct their own solar towers and tested those same towers against strong wind currents.  He also said that another memorable experience was their tour of the Columbia Memorial Space Center.

Elizabeth, who is also in 8th grade  and who has been attending SIPA sessions for about one and a half years now, expressed her sense of pride in her testimonial speech.  She won an individual award in one of the STEM contests wherein the students were challenged to build the strongest bridge out of 100 popsicle sticks.  The 8th grader also said that STEM was very successful in helping her learn more about physical science, even though she had difficulty learning about it in school.

Eugene Eng, Verizon Vice President for External Affairs, was also in the event for the ceremonial turning over of the check worth $45,000 to SIPA.  Eng remarked how it was terrific that SIPA recognized the importance of cultivating a culture of STEM learning among Los Angeles youth.

“STEM skills are core skills that children are going to need in order to be competitive in the 21st century,” Eng said.

“Just based on the reaction, energy, and enthusiasm generated by Joel (Jacinto) and his staff, it is already a good gauge on measuring the success of their approach in teaching STEM to the children.”

Eng also said that Verizon will continue to work with SIPA in the future to work on STEM or other noteworthy projects that are in line with the company’s corporate social responsibility programs.

SIPA Executive Director Joel Jacinto confirmed that the financial grant was used as a “direct support” to the SIPA’s summer program, of which the STEM modules were a part of. Furthermore, the funds will also be used for the instructional technology equipment and mobile devices that are being integrated into the SIPA curriculum.

“It is important to note that corporate America is interested in us and is starting to invest in the Filipino-American community,” Jacinto revealed, “It is important that we are benefitting from Verizon’s philanthropic program.”

 

source: http://www.asianjournal.com/community/community-news/17937-underserved-la-youth-completes-first-ever-stem-summer-program-at-sipa.html


Twelve California Women Honored as "Leading Women in STEM" for Advancing STEM Education

Twelve women from across California were honored as “Leading Women in STEM” at an awards luncheon at the 2012 California STEM Summit at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina in San Diego. The Leading Women in STEM awards recognize their achievements in advancing innovative and effective STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education initiatives across the state and serving as exemplary role models for California women and girls.

The California STEM Summit is a statewide leadership convening of business, government, education, nonprofit and philanthropic luminaries to spark change in STEM education and workforce development and launch new STEM education initiatives. The Summit is convened by the nonprofit California STEM Learning Network (CSLNet), which works to bring systemic change to how STEM is taught and learned in California in order to prepare the nation’s most STEM-capable graduates.

Recognizing the dramatic need for increasing the number of women in STEM fields – only 25% of STEM jobs in the U.S. are held by women – CSLNet is highlighting accomplished women STEM leaders and supporting initiatives across California to bolster STEM education for female students, noting that women with STEM jobs earn 33% more than comparable women in non-STEM jobs.

“The California STEM Learning Network is proud to honor these highly accomplished education, industry, non-profit and civic leaders for their innovative and successful efforts to create world-class STEM education across California,” said Chris Roe, California STEM Learning Network CEO. “Their leadership will ensure that our next generation of leaders is truly reflective of the great diversity and talent that we have in our state.”

The Leading Women in STEM honorees are:

    Dr. Joan Bissell, Teacher Education and Public School Programs, California State University Chancellor’s Office

    Sandra Birmingham, STEM Pipeline Outreach Director, California State University, Channel Islands

    Rachel Bondi, Chief of Mobile Innovation, Creative Artists Agency

    Assemblymember Susan Bonilla (CA-11)

    Dr. Pamela Clute, Assistant Vice Chancellor Educational and Community Engagement, University of California, Riverside

    Judy D’Amico, Senior Director of Engagement, Project Lead the Way

    Dawn Garrett, SAS Operations Director, Raytheon

    Dr. Susan Hackwood, Executive Director, California Council on Science and Technology

    Dr. Linda Katehi, Chancellor, UC Davis

    Dr. Helen Quinn, Professor Emerita, Stanford University

    Dr. Carol Tang, Director, Coalition for Science After School

    Nancy Taylor, San Diego County Office of Education/San Diego Science Alliance

Honorees were awarded for their leadership in advancing critical areas of STEM education including adoption of Next Generation Science Standards, strengthening STEM teacher pathways, advocating for strengthened public-private partnerships and alignment of resources, and ensuring all California students have access to high-quality STEM in out-of-school time.

More about the STEM Summit is at http://www.castemsummit.com.

source: http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/Twelve-California-Women-Honored-as-Leading-Women-3952836.php

 


Colfax High students get up-close look at manufacturing - Colfax Record

Students from Colfax High School were among those celebrating Manufacturing Day this month. To attract students to highly paid in-demand manufacturing careers, Sierra College is collaborating with businesses, high schools, Placer County and local cities to celebrate Manufacturing Day during October. Businesses across the nation are hosting Manufacturing Day events to promote manufacturing careers and manufacturing's value to the U.S. economy.

Sierra Pacific Industries lumber mill in Lincoln hosted Colfax High School Project Lead The Way on Oct. 3. Students toured the co-generation plant, which creates power from its waste to power the plants small- and large-log mills as well as to the city of Lincoln.

"It was an amazing experience to see how a tree is turned into lumber and other useful products,” said Colfax High junior Trever Nielsen. “I am extremely interested in the engineering aspect of the mill, and seeing the large automated machines in operation was great.”

Colfax High math and pre-engineering teacher Jonathan Schwartz said the trip to Lincoln was a “fantastic” day, and thanked the Sierra College Center for Applied Technologies and to Sierra Pacific Lumber Mill for arranging the tour.

"The 34 students that went on the field trip learned about the milling process and how essential math skills are to just about every aspect of manufacturing,” Schwartz said.

Carol Pepper-Kittredge, director of the Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies, helped facilitate the tours. “Students are inspired when they see appealing work environments and hear about interesting projects from employees,” Pepper-Kittredge said. “Our goal is to give students a memorable experience that motivates them to pursue mechatronics, welding, engineering, or drafting and engineering support at Sierra College and acquire the skills needed to work for local manufacturers.

“Local high schools are offering excellent career technical education courses where students are exposed to design, drafting and fabrication using industry 3D design software and manufacturing tools,” she said. “The tours make manufacturers aware that students are earning welding industry certifications, making robotic projects, programming CNC equipment and producing amazing designs.”

According to Dave Snyder, Placer County Economic Development Director, there are approximately 270 manufacturers in Placer County, with an annual payroll of $547 million that employ more than 7,000 residents. On Tuesday, Oct. 30, the Placer County Economic Development Board will host the 2012 Manufacturer’s Forum to bring together manufacturers and elected officials. The Placer County Board of Supervisors, the City of Colfax, and other Placer County cities proclaimed Oct. 5 as Manufacturers Day.

The Sierra College Center for Applied Competitive Technologies serves manufacturers and technology companies with customized training and technical support; provides entrepreneurs with access to rapid prototyping and other manufacturing technologies; and supports career technical education programs in manufacturing and product development, engineering and design pathways at the high school and college level.

 

 

source: http://colfaxrecord.com/detail/222023.html


Discovery Days at AT&T Park

AT&T Park will become a science wonderland when the Bay Area Science Festival concludes again with this FREE science extravaganza on Saturday November 3rd 11AM-4PM. Last year, more than 21,000 people enjoyed a non-stop program chock-full of interactive exhibits, experiments, games, and shows, all meant to entertain and inspire. With more than 150 exhibits, there is something for everyone to unleash their inner scientist.

Parking/Transportation

We encourage everyone to take public transportation to the event as we expect big crowds. AT&T Park is accessible by MUNI, Caltrain, and BART. For more information on public transportation options to the ballpark, check out AT&T Park’s transit page.

Limited parking will be available in Lot A for $10/vehicle.

Chevron STEM Zone

 “Studio C”/Technology
This exhibit is a fully-functioning television studio where guests get to experience the technology behind a sports’ broadcast.  Participants will use teleprompters, video cameras, studio lights, audio recording equipment, and green screen technology to create their own broadcast – which can then be uploaded to our YouTube channel.

 “Science of Pitching”/Aerodynamics
This demonstration uses compressed air to launch a ping pong ball towards a target (a batter and a catcher’s mitt).  A small patch of sand paper near the end of the cannon barrel causes the ball to spin as it leaves the barrel.  Students can observe how the spin of the ball will affect the flight of the ball toward the plate.

 “Energyville”/Engineering
Four laptop computers are connected to the internet site www.energyville.com.  Energyville is a game developed by The Economist Group that allows players to control the energy mix of a virtual city and to discover the economic, environmental, and security impacts of their decisions. Come play the game and learn more about the energy sources and demands that shape energy decisions worldwide.

“Gravity Ball Drop”/Acceleration due to Gravity
This demonstration shows that the acceleration due to gravity affects all objects equally.  The exhibit uses an apparatus to drop 5 different sports balls ranging in size from a golf ball to a bowling ball, at the same time.  The exhibit shows that all balls will drop at the same rate.  The exhibit also shows that drag will affect the rate of fall.

 Chevron Energy Solutions - The Science of Solar
Chevron invites visitors to adjust and play with mini-solar panels to  capture sunlight and to power a water pump. The better the panels are angled to capture sunlight, the more solar energy is generated to power the water pump.Watch how much faster the water pump transfers water from one bucket to another when the mini-solar panels are angled in the right position to capture the most sunlight.

Techbridge – Design and “carry on”!
Come by the Techbridge booth to participate in an opportunity to design a prototype of a carrying device to transport grain (sand). Participants will be provided with basic materials such as recycled plastic grocery bags, cardstock, rubber bands and paper. With these materials, they will have 5 minutes to design the carrying structure and test it on a Barbie doll or another type of doll. This activity will highlight the engineering design process and designing for a cause.

Chabot Space & Science Center - Train Like an Astronaut
Have fun with our hands-on activities that take you through astronaut training-style exercises. Test your balance skills and how well your brain can adapt to new conditions. Watch what happens to objects as we simulate launching them into space with our vacuum chamber!

MARE/Lawrence Hall of Science – Marine Activities, Resources and Education - Sand on Stage

Visitors will explore sand samples from around the world with hand lenses and microscopes. By observing the color, size, and shape of sand grains, they will be able to make predictions about the beaches from which the sand came. Are waves on the beach good for surfing? What is the sand made of? How old is the sand? Visitors will also be able to create and take home sand cards to share with others.

RAFT (Resource Area for Teaching)Glove-a-phone
Combine a straw, glove and tube to make a “note” worthy sound activity.

Colors of Light
Discover the rainbow in white light with this easy to build spectroscope.

Puff Rocket
Experiment with air pressure as you propel a straw rocket with a simple squeeze.

Rollback Can
Learn about potential and kinetic energy as you roll the can and it rolls back to you!

Richmond High School, Robotics Program - Shooting hoops with G6
Come shoot some hoops with G6!  See how the robot built by the students performs on the court shooting basketballs.

Girls Inc. - Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powered Vehicle and HTML Coding
We will provide a model of an alternative vehicle energy source, and providing an explanation on how it works. Allowing the participants to examine and operate the model. Youth will learn how easy and simple HTML coding is to design a website on their own.

source: http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/discovery-days-at-att-park/

 


Alcoa Foundation Awards Simi Valley Education Foundation $15,000 Grant To Support STEM Project in Simi Valley Unified School District

Simi Valley Education Foundation announced the award of $15,000 grant from Alcoa Foundation to support a new STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) project in the Simi Valley Unified School District. This generous grant will incorporate the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT education kits into a STEM Enrichment Program. Use of robotics brings science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to life for students!

Under the direction of the Simi Valley Unified School District Director of Secondary Education and Director of Elementary Education, the STEM Enrichment Program will be utilized in grades 4-6 in elementary schools and in all three middle school and all four high schools in the Simi Valley Unified School District. The year will culminate with a robotics night where students will share what they have learned and created.

Kevin Casey, Director/General Manager and Jim Vigdor, Operations Manager, both from Alcoa Fastening Systems in Simi Valley, personally delivered the check to the Foundation at a recent Board meeting. “Alcoa is delighted to partner with the Simi Valley Education Foundation again this year. By investing in STEM education, we can play an active role in shaping and supporting curriculum and creating hands-on opportunities to keep students engaged,” Jim Vigdor said. To date, Alcoa Fastening Systems has provided $132,000 in grants to the Foundation.

As one of the largest global mining, manufacturing and engineering companies, Alcoa sees a huge opportunity when they provide grants to help prepare students in the areas where they are seeing a tremendous skills gap: science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM).

The Simi Valley Education Foundation believes that an excellent public education is every child’s right and is committed to providing programs and funds to enhance the learning experience of the students in Simi Valley.

For more information visit the http://www.svef.org or call 877-SIMI-KID.

 

 

source: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/oct/23/alcoa-foundation-awards-simi-valley-education-foun/


Google partners with CSU to bolster STEM education in California

A brain trust of educators, philanthropists and business leaders convened in San Diego to discuss how science, technology, engineering and math – STEM subjects – are taught in California schools.

The summit wrapped up Tuesday afternoon - but not before honoring a dozen “Leading Women in STEM”, all of whom work in science and technology-driven fields. Including LA’s own, Rachel Bondi, Chief of Mobile Innovations for the talent agency, CAA.

The other big reveal: a $25,000 grant that partners Google with the California State University System, and the California STEM Learning Network – the nonprofit that hosted the conference.

All three organizations are members of the “100K in 10” campaign – a program the Obama administration launched to recruit 100,000 new STEM teachers over the next decade.  (An attempt to thwart the looming shortage of STEM teachers across the country.)

Chris Roe, CEO of the California STEM Learning Network, said he learned about the award “a few days ago.” Roe said the initiative will support new science and math elementary teachers in STEM through an online professional learning community. Enrolled teachers will receive graduate credit transferable to a Master’s Degree.

Within California’s education budget, $25,000 is barely a blip on the radar, but Roe insists that the money will go a long way toward improving STEM education statewide.

“It’s often times the small money at the margins that can create the incentives for groups to work together that might not otherwise do so.  So I think the grant amount is very small but what it does is it changes behavior.”

Roe said the collaboration will roll out slowly. A few Cal State campuses will begin to offer the online courses shortly after the holidays. 

source: http://www.scpr.org/blogs/education/2012/10/17/10528/google-awards-grant-bolster-stem-education-califor/

 


NBA Great Named Calif. After-School STEM Ambassador

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the National Basketball Association's all-time leading scorer, will be promoting the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects over the next year as California's After-School STEM Ambassador, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced Monday.

Torlakson revealed the news about Abdul-Jabbar at the third annual California STEM Summit, where the basketball superstar was set to deliver a keynote address toward the end of the day.

"If America is to maintain our high standard of living, we must continue to innovate," said Abdul-Jabbar in a statement. "We are competing with nations many times our size, and STEM learning represents the engines of innovation. With these engines, we can lead the world, because knowledge is real power."

As California After-School STEM Ambassador, Abdul-Jabbar will make appearances at after-school programs around the state over the next year to promote STEM education. The California STEM Learning Network, which my colleague Nora Fleming wrote extensively about earlier this year, convened the STEM Summit in its mission to improve STEM education throughout the state.

Believe it or not, Abdul-Jabbar has invested considerable time promoting STEM education over the past few years. Through his Skyhook Foundation, which he started in 2009, Abdul-Jabbar has been actively promoting the importance of STEM education and STEM-related careers.

On Jan. 18, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton appointed Abdul-Jabbar as a U.S. Global Cultural Ambassador. In that role, which he'll continue throughout the rest of 2012, Abdul-Jabbar has been traveling around the world to discuss the importance of education and cultural tolerance.

Earlier this summer, he also spoke at U.S. News and World Report's STEM Conference in Dallas, saying, "STEM education is the key to gainful employment for all of the young people we serve." At the conference, Abdul-Jabbar hammered on the cultural shift that's necessary to make STEM jobs more attractive to youths, especially in lower-income communities.

"They see themselves only being able to be successful in the area of sports or entertainment," Abdul-Jabbar said at the summit, according to U.S. News. "If they can't be Jay-Z or LeBron James, they don't think they can be successful."

Abdul-Jabbar pointed out that while there are only 450 NBA jobs available at any one time (30 teams with 15 players on each, not counting the Developmental League), there are "thousands upon thousands of engineering jobs" available.

He made the same point in an interview with U.S. News back in May, saying that youths would be "better off if they have a lot of opportunities to choose from, not just sports or entertainment. And they will have those additional opportunities if we continue to emphasize education, especially in STEM classes."

Abdul-Jabbar's role as STEM ambassador could take on extra importance in California, as a November 2011 report from WestEd found that a majority of elementary students in the state weren't being exposed to high-quality science instruction, according to my colleague Erik Robelen on the Curriculum Matters blog.

 

source: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/schooled_in_sports/2012/10/kareem_abdul-jabbar_named_calif_after-school_stem_ambassador.html


California STEM Summit Convenes Business, Education, Policy and Philanthropic Leaders to Launch Statewide STEM Teaching, Learning and Job Creation Initiatives.

With California business, civic and education leaders sounding alarm bells about shortages of highly trained workers and the vital need to bolster science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, the California STEM Learning Network(CSLNet) is convening business, government, education, nonprofit and philanthropic luminaries to launch new STEM education initiatives at the 2012 California STEM Summit taking place October 15 and 16 at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina in San Diego, California.

Despite record unemployment, California employers say they can’t find enough STEM-capable candidates, with 1.4 STEM jobs open for every qualified job seeker. This increased demand for STEM workers comes as California lags behind other states in math and science proficiency, and as comparably fewer of its students graduate with STEM degrees.

The goal of the California STEM Summit is to spark change in STEM education and workforce development. The Summit will launch and advance new initiatives designed to boost STEM education from Pre-K to college, including programs to recruit and train teachers and bolster STEM offerings during out-of-school-time settings. Attendees will also learn about the new Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards and how together they provide a framework for high-quality STEM education for California’s more than six million K-12 students. California STEM Summit speakers include:

    State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson

    NBA legend and education champion Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

    Education scientist and TED Talk luminary Dr. Sugata Mitra

    Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla

    David Seidel of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who will share findings from the Mars rover Curiosity expedition and discuss how NASA is making these resources available to educators.

The Summit will also recognize Leading Women in STEM across the state and feature a Student STEM Showcase, with hands-on demonstrations of award-winning science, technology, engineering and math innovations by students.

“All California students deserve access to world-class STEM education that prepares them for academic, career and personal success,” said Chris Roe, California STEM Learning Network CEO. “The California STEM Summit serves as a catalyst to advance high quality STEM education and prepare California’s future workforce so our state can continue to lead the world in innovation and new job creation.”

California boasts more patents and Nobel Prize winners than any other state and is home to nearly one million STEM workers, more than 13% of the nation’s overall STEM workforce. More about the STEM Summit is at http://www.castemsummit.com.

source: http://www.sfgate.com/business/prweb/article/California-Business-Education-Civic-Leaders-3939728.php 

 


Lt. Gov. Talks Jobs, Education at Cal Poly Pomona

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom admonished California for getting away from its roots as a “state of dreamers and doers” Tuesday.

Newsom, along with business and education leaders, participated in Cal Poly Pomona’s Engineering and Cyber Security Workforce Development Summit.

Students, alumni, and faculty attended the on-campus event, which included panel discussions on the future of workplace development, aerospace and cyber security.

Newsom said as someone fairly new to state government, he considers himself a “frustrated optimist” with regards to the California’s economic and educational future.

“I think the state needs to step up its game,” he said.  “I think the state needs to get back in the future business.”

Between 1950 and 1980, no state grew more jobs than California, which had a 3.7 percent annual growth rate during those decades, he said.  In the past 30 years, that growth has stalled to around 1.1 percent annually, he added, pointing to complacency as a problem.

“We have become average,” he said.

Newsom, who sits on the board of trustees for the CSU system, pointed to education cuts, adding that California’s public universities saw more then $2 billion slashed last year.

He said it took 143 years to build up the University of California system, and now it is in peril because of cuts.

“Were not just cutting into the muscle and the bone, even here at CSUs, we’re cutting into the artery,” he said. “When you don’t have a plan for cuts, you cut the wrong place and you bleed out."

A solid future requires investment in education, he said.

“You can’t have an economic development strategy without a workforce development strategy,” he said.

The lack of training in key fields also is an issue, specifically those involving technology.  The state has more than 500,000 jobs available that employers can’t fill because the skill set is not there, he said.

“We’ve got to educate past or at least up to technology,” he said.  “We’re not conveying enough talent.”

Newsom called for more partnerships between businesses and colleges and universities.

The challenge to get back to greatness is to give up the idea that Sacramento needs to be the place of inspiration, he said.

“There is not a problem in this state, economic or otherwise, that hasn’t been solved by somebody somewhere,” he said. “So the challenge is scaling it.  Go local. Regions rising together. Don’t wait around for Sacramento.”

Business leaders from companies such as Visa, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ducommun Inc., and Occidental Petroleum Corp. talked about the importance of luring college graduates from the STEM  (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields to work in their industries, the skills needed to get hired, and the average six-figure salaries that come with those jobs.

Per Beith, Boeing’s director of global network operations, said his company has hired many engineers from Cal Poly Pomona and is looking for employees who have software, network, and electronics skills. 

Also needed are leaders, as long-time employees get set to retire, he said.

“Don’t just think about your technical skills,” he said.  “Think of your leadership skills because your opportunity to grow at an accelerated rate at companies like Boeing I think is unsurpassed.”

William Leubke, technical director of the Corona-based NAVSEA, also said Cal Poly graduates play a big role in his agency.

Around 10 percent of NAVSEA’s workforce comes from Cal Poly Pomona, he said.

Mayar Amouzegar, dean of Cal Poly’s College of engineering, said that the university has one of the largest engineering programs in the country.

One out of 14 engineers in California comes from Cal Poly, he said.  Companies have been receiving talented students from the colleges, but with very little investment back into the future of the university's engineering and science programs. That needs to change, he said.

“I am looking not to Sacramento to help us grow, but I am looking local at our partner companies,” he said.  “To continue to produce wonderful engineers and scientists, we need investment and not necessarily all from Sacramento.” 

source: http://claremont-laverne.patch.com/articles/lt-gov-gavin-newsom-visits-cal-poly-pomona

 

 


Large Grant Aims to Increase Number of Math, Science Teachers

National Science Foundation grant will help Claremont Graduate University recruit and train math and science teachers for high-need public school districts.

Claremont Graduate University has received a grant of nearly $800,000 from the National Science Foundation to recruit and train math and science teachers for high-need public school districts.

The grant, funded through the NSF's Robert Noyce Scholarship Program, will enable CGU's School of Educational Studies to develop 40 new teachers over the next five years. These NSF Teaching Fellows will receive national exposure, significant financial support, and continued professional opportunities through this program, according to a news release from he graduate school.

“We want to find the top undergraduate college students in the science, technology, engineering and math fields and put them on the path to the classroom and school leadership,” Lisa Loop, co-director of Claremont Graduate University's Teacher Education Internship Program wrote. “This grant allows us to offer scholarships and other support to graduates who have a passion to help the next generation and who want to make a difference, especially in high need areas and minority communities.”



 

The United States has a critical need for qualified teachers in the science, technology, engineering, and math fields, and has established a goal of preparing 100,000 of them over the next decade. Traditionally, too few of the best undergraduate students have chosen to teach.



 

The Robert Noyce Scholarship Program aims to remedy this problem by funding scholarships, extra support, and recruitment campaigns to attract graduates with science, technology, engineering and math backgrounds who might otherwise not have considered careers in teaching. 



 

NSF Teaching Fellows will leave the graduate school in as little as one year with master's degrees in education or applied mathematics and California teaching credentials. In exchange, they are required to complete two years of teaching in high-need school districts for each year of financial support. 



 

The university will partner in its recruitment efforts with the five undergraduate schools in the Claremont College Consortium: Harvey Mudd, Claremont McKenna, Pomona, Scripps, and Pitzer Colleges. It will also launch a recruitment campaign at Texas Southern University to increase the enrollment of African-American candidates, though graduates from any other university are encouraged to apply.



 

This is the second time Claremont Graduate University has received a grant from the Robert Noyce Scholarship Program. In 2005, the university was awarded $460,000 it used to recruit and train 40 STEM teachers, 38 of whom remain in the classroom today. The project’s directors are David Drew, education professor at CGU, and Darryl Yong, mathematics professor at Harvey Mudd College, along with Loop.  

 

 

source: http://claremont-laverne.patch.com/articles/large-grant-aims-to-increase-number-of-math-science-teachers


Green Engineering Academy Students find Energy Savings

Students in the Green Engineering Academy at Livermore High School (LHS) are looking for ways to make their school even greener by reducing energy usage. Over the summer, several students worked with KW Engineering on a facilities energy audit of the LHS campus and several area schools.

The audit uncovered about $35,000 in potential savings from simple changes, such as upgrading to more efficient light bulbs and computers, installing programmable thermostats, eliminating unnecessary lighting, and running pumps on the school pool only as needed. For the students, it was a chance to put into practice some of the engineering skills they have been learning in the classroom.

“The students experienced the non-geeky side of engineering,” says LHS teacher Mike Waltz, who leads the Green Engineering Academy. “I think it was cool for them to see what engineers really do and get some recognition for helping their school and the environment. Plus, they’ve made connections with the engineers at KW and other partners in this project, so they now have new resources and mentors.”

The audit is part of the Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE)’s Leadership in Energy Efficiency Program (LEEP), which is funded by PG&E’s Innovator Pilot Program. LEEP provides financially constrained local school districts access to a centralized resource for energy efficiency expertise and energy management assistance. LEEP also partners with green jobs education programs like the LHS Green Engineering Academy to provide hands-on field training and resume-building opportunities for students.

After LEEP was established two years ago, the ACOE reached out to all of the school districts in the County. The Livermore School District’s conservation committee seized the opportunity and soon reached out to Waltz.

“We are thrilled to be in this partnership with the Alameda County Office of Education and PG&E,” says Livermore School Superintendent Kelly Bowers. “This project really ties into our goal of ensuring that our students graduate with the skills to contribute and thrive in a changing world. Energy conservation is a big part of that changing world.”

While most of their friends were sleeping late, the Green Engineering Academy students were up bright and early over the summer to meet with the KW engineers for training and to visit school sites. They conducted audits of LHS, Granada High School, Amador Valley High School, and Alisal Elementary School in Pleasanton.

Although some of the students’ tasks seemed tedious — like counting light bulbs and checking the clocks on programmable thermostats – they are key components of a thorough energy audit. “When we conduct a facility audit, we make a lot of estimates because we don’t have time to get that specific,” says Duane Kubischta of KW Engineering. “The students know their campus best.”

LHS student Natasha Moore learned a lot doing the energy audit. “It was really interesting to see what was happening at the different school sites,” she says. “I was surprised to learn that people actually learn better in natural light and that just changing to a different light bulb can save so much energy and money. Simple things can cause big problems.”

The students will work with KW Engineering on audits of schools in several Bay Area cities. Waltz says the students also may conduct audits at other Livermore schools. That supports the efforts of the conservation committee, led by consultant David Darlington who ran Environmental Education for Kids (EEK!) for many years.

“The primary business of schools is to educate. This is outside of their purview. So this committee is looking at absolutely every way to reduce consumption,” he says. “The District spends nearly two million dollars each year on gas and electric. Our goal is to cut that in half in five years.”

A classic example, adds Darlington, is an ice machine in a custodial closet at Granada High School. “This was an old-fashioned ice machine that was rarely used. It was consuming 3.5 gallons of water a minute and 22 amps of electricity, an annual cost of $11,000,” he says.

Other changes are occupancy sensors on vending machines, which turn off cooling when they are not in use, and upgrading lights in multipurpose rooms and gymnasiums district-wide. The cost to upgrade to energy efficient lights and appliances is mitigated by rebates.

This school year, the conservation committee began a competition among school sites to reduce energy consumption. Each quarter, school sites will receive 50% of the money saved from reduced energy consumption compared with the same quarter a year earlier. Darlington says that in the first quarter, from July through September, energy costs are down by about $56,000.

“I’m looking forward to seeing how our sites can continue to reduce consumption,” he says. “The goal of cutting our energy bill in half in five years is ambitious, but it’s good to aim high.”

 

 

source: http://www.independentnews.com/community/article_3f590df2-0e6b-11e2-b4b1-0019bb2963f4.html


Partnering to Power the Future of California’s STEM Education

 

At first glance, the California STEM Learning Network (CSLNet) and the California Afterschool Network may seem odd partners. One is an organization focused on boosting learning opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. The other, a statewide network building the quality and capacity of afterschool care across the state.  But together they share a great concern about the future of California’s students and their access to high quality STEM education.

 

Currently, California’s students face a vexing challenge: they have too few opportunities – during the traditional school day and during out-of-school time – to participate in the hands-on exploration of science and other STEM subjects that are vital to their futures. That’s why CSLNet and the California Afterschool Network have joined together in common purpose to expand access to high quality STEM learning opportunities.

 

To that end, we’ve teamed up to launch The Power of Discovery: STEM2, a new initiative to greatly expand STEM Learning Opportunities for young people in out-of-school time settings. The Power of Discovery: STEM2 will build and support partnerships between schools, after school organizations, and community partners such as museums and zoos, to strengthen their capacity to provide high quality STEM Learning opportunities.  Mobilizing a broad coalition of partners, including higher education, business and industry and others with the STEM expertise and resources, this initiative will engage students in the hands-on exploration and practice of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

 

As a first step, with funding and support from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, Noyce Foundation and the Samueli Foundation, The Power of Discovery: STEM2 initiative has funded three regional partnerships to serve as Regional Innovation Providers, offering critical support for STEM learning in selected regions across California. These regional partnerships will work to foster leadership and build effective partnerships between after school providers, schools and community organizations. Regional Innovation Providers will also support efforts to build the capacity of out-of-school time programs to expand quality STEM learning opportunities that generate interest in learning and further student understanding of the concepts of the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards.

 

The Power of Discovery: STEM2 will initially leverage more than 4,500 statewide after school programs to engage students in high quality STEM learning opportunities.  That’s a promising start, but we’re just beginning. With new partners, innovation providers and public-private-philanthropic sector collaborations, we look forward to expanding STEM in out-of-school time learning opportunities for greater and greater numbers of students, opening new doors of opportunity during and far beyond their academic careers.

The Power of Discovery: STEM2 Regional Innovation Providers

Six talented organizations have been selected to collaborate in three regional partnerships that will serve as Regional Innovation Support Providers to expand STEM learning in California. Each organization received a grant award of $70,000 and will work collaboratively to foster leadership, build partnerships and provide capacity-building to support high quality STEM in out-of-school time programs.

Greater Bay Area

The Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE), the Gateways East Bay STEM Network and the Tech Museum of Innovation in the Silicon Valley were selected to jointly facilitate cross-sector partnerships, and provide tools, resources, and support to increase high quality STEM learning Opportunities in at least 250 after school program sites across eleven Bay Area counties including Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz.

Sacramento/Northern California

The Sacramento County Office of Education (SCOE) will work with partners such as UC Davis, the Powerhouse Science Center, SCOE’s After School Office and Science and Math Curriculum Departments to create and offer STEM training, program planning and implementation support to administrators and staff to at least 125 afterschool program sites across ten regional counties including Alpine, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba.

Orange County/San Diego

In Southern California, the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) and Orange County STEM Initiative (OC STEM) will partner to increase high quality STEM learning opportunities in at least 250 after school program sites across Imperial, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego Counties. SDCOE and OC STEM will facilitate cross-sector partnerships, inclusive of institutions of higher education, industry, and community based organizations to accelerate student learning and build the capacity of out-of-school time programs to offer meaningful STEM learning opportunities.

 

 

source: http://toped.svefoundation.org/2012/10/04/partnering-to-power-the-future-of-california’s-stem-education/


USD gets $20 million for engineering school

Philanthropist Darlene Shiley is donating $20 million to the University of San Diego to enable the campus to create a school of engineering in a region where two large universities are already competing for the best students in one of the hottest fields in academia.

The new gift will let USD transform its small but growing engineering department into a school through the hiring of a dean, support workers, long term improvements to classroom and research space, as well as student scholarships.

“I’m doing this because my late husband, Donald, was, at his core, an engineer whose work helped save the lives of 400,000 people,” said Shiley. “I’d like to see USD turn out one or two engineers like him.”

Donald Shiley invented heart valves that went into wide use in the 1970s, profoundly changing heart care, and making him one of the country’s first practicing bioengineers. He was educated at the University of Portland, which would later receive a $12 million gift from the Shileys to improve its engineering school.

The $20 million that Darlene Shiley is giving USD is the largest gift the campus has received from a single donor since the late Joan B. Kroc bequeathed about $50 million in 2003. The Shiley family earlier gave USD $13.5 million for a science and technology center, theater renovations and the Masters in Fine Arts program. The latest gift makes Darlene Shiley and her husband Donald, who died in 2010, USD’s second largest benefactor in university history.

“This is another in a series of very transformative gifts from the Shileys, and Mrs. Shiley,” said USD President Mary E. Lyons. “We’re going to have our own free-standing School of Engineering.”

The USD engineering program, which is offered only at the undergraduate level, has tripled to 363 students since 2004, reflecting the growth of the discipline nationwide. US News and World Report ranked USD’s program 25th best in the country among engineering schools where the highest degree is a bachelor’s or Master’s degree.

USD doesn’t have immediate plans to introduce a doctoral program, or to significantly increase undergraduate enrollment. “Quality over quantity is what we’re focused on,” said President Lyons.

She added the USD is more likely to complement the large engineering programs at the University of California San Diego and San Diego State University, which focus on many areas, especially such traditional disciplines as civil engineering. USD offers bachelor’s degrees in electrical, mechanical, and industrial and systems engineering.

Enrollment in engineering programs has been rising, especially in regions like San Diego County, where there are large numbers of defense, electronics and biotech companies like General Atomics, Northrop Grumman and Qualcomm, who who need workers. Simply earning an undergraduate degree in engineering leads to a good-paying job, says the 2011-2012 PayScale College Salary Report. Seven of the top 10 jobs in the report are for people who majored in engineering. For example, the starting median salary for an undergraduate who studied petroleum engineering is $97,900. The figure is $61,300 for an electrical engineering, a discipline taught at USD. The starting median pay for people with psychology degrees is $35,000, and it is $41,000 for those with a business degree.

 

 

source: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/sep/25/usd-given-20-million-create-engineering-school/


UC Davis wins grants to study the effects of robotics in teaching

Two new grants awarded to UC Davis by the National Science Foundation will study the effect of robotics in teaching science, technology, engineering and math from elementary to high school.

 

Both projects are led by Harry Cheng, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the UC Davis K-14 Outreach Center for Computing and STEM Education.

 

"Robotics involves a variety of math, information technology, and engineering concepts," Cheng said. "Introducing computing and robotics into the math and science curriculum helps make abstract ideas concrete and allows students to apply mathematical concepts to real world problems."

 

The C-STEM Center also will hold a Fall Robotics Academy for school teachers on the weekend of Oct. 13-14. The class will train teachers to use robots and computing in their classrooms.

 

"These recent NSF awards to the UCD C-STEM Center are a tremendous validation of the incredible work being done by Harry Cheng and his colleagues," said Enrique Lavernia, dean of the College of Engineering. "It's critical that we develop creative and innovative approaches to K-12 instruction, to assure the successful realization of every student's potential. Professor Cheng has confronted the challenge of math engagement with middle school and high school students with an innovative approach using the latest in computing and robotics technology."

 

The larger grant, from NSF's National Robotics Initiative, provides $950,000 over three years to study

 

how the use of robotics programs in schools can change kids' attitudes to science, technology, engineering and math subjects. Co-investigators on the grant are Professor Jean Vandergheynst, associate dean for undergraduate studies in the College of Engineering and co-director of the C-STEM center; and Tobin White, associate professor in the UC Davis School of Education.

 

The project will recruit teachers from Sacramento area schools from grades six and up and provide them with robots, teaching resources and training in how to integrate computing and robotics in their teaching with engaging, fun activities for real-world problem solving.

 

Their students will be able to enter the RoboPlay Competitions run by the C-STEM Center. RoboPlay is designed to let K-12 students use robots while exploring their creativity in writing, art, music, choreography, design and filmmaking, and at the same time seamlessly learn and apply computing and STEM concepts to solve practical problems.

 

A second recent grant, of $300,000 over two years from the NSF's Cyberlearning: Transforming Education program, will fund a study of how robots and handheld computers can be used specifically in teaching algebra. That study will involve two schools in Washington Unified School District in West Sacramento.

 

The UCD robotics curriculum helps students excel, Cheng said -- especially students who do not typically do well in middle-school math and related subjects.

Together with another grant received in June 2011, the center has now received a total of three NSF grants totaling almost $1.8 million in the past 18 months to support its educational outreach work.

 

In addition to the Fall Academy, the center also organizes an annual two-week Summer Institute for teachers and a weekend Winter Academy in January. The marquee event is the annual UC Davis C-STEM Day, held this year in May, which combines a conference and workshop on computing and STEM education with robotics competitions for students.

 

source: http://www.dailydemocrat.com/ci_21620546/robot-teachers-may-one-day-be-providing-instruction

 


UC Berkeley adopts mentorship program for women in STEM majors

As part of a larger effort to increase female participation in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, UC Berkeley has signed on to be a lead institution in a new online mentorship program designed to encourage young female undergraduates to enter STEM fields.

The program, called Women in Technology Sharing Online (WitsOn), is a six-week national program that will take place on Piazza, an online forum site employed by students and professors to ask and answer questions about class material, such as homework and exams.

“Pooja Sankar, the founder of Piazza, had the idea for this program,” said Maria Klawe, the president of Harvey Mudd College, which is a sponsor of the program. “She felt quite shy because she was one of three female computer science majors at the Indian Institutes of Technology (Kanpur campus) and, through her own experience, thought that girls in these fields didn’t have enough role models.”

According to Klawe, the program, which starts Oct. 1, is not a formal class but rather an online community for mentors from these industries to share their experiences and impart advice to prospective students wanting to pursue careers in the fields.

Klawe said that mentors for the program must be females who have already earned their undergraduate degrees in one of the STEM fields and be able to commit at least one hour on their assigned day to answering questions posed by students on the program site. She said that 365 women have already signed up to be mentors for the program nationally, and, at this rate, she expects that the program will have more than 500 mentors by its start.

“Computer science and engineering fields don’t see a lot of women, and we actually know why,” Klawe said. “A lot of young women don’t think they will be good in these fields because images in the media show that these fields are male-dominated.”

Klawe, a renowned computer scientist who has made significant research contributions to her field, is one of six lead mentors in the program, which is designed to have a different lead mentor every week along with several other mentors to answer students’ questions daily.

According to Klawe, though the program is aimed at undergraduate students, graduate students wishing to participate can sign up to be mentors.

“I would have loved to have a mentor who was active in the field to help motivate my undergraduate courses — that is, give me perspective on exactly what was important to extract from my classes,” said Leah Anderson, a third-year doctoral student in systems engineering in the civil and environmental engineering department who has signed on to be a mentor, in an email.

Signing up to participate in the program is simple, according to Colette Patt, the diversity director of the Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences in the UC Berkeley College of Letters and Science. Undergraduate students currently enrolled in a class that uses Piazza can sign up for the program instantly online. Students not using Piazza can request enrollment or ask faculty members to sign them up.

The program is also open to male undergraduates.

“Women who are mentored by men really value that mentoring relationship, because it can be incredibly productive and valuable,” Patt said. “The same can be true in the opposite direction.”

This is not the only program on campus aimed at increasing female involvement in STEM fields. The Society for Women in Science and the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) residential theme program also aim to support and encourage young female undergraduates to pursue careers in the STEM fields.

“Without these programs, it would take a very certain kind of woman to care and pursue her goals,” said Alexis Seymour, a junior bioengineering major and a resident adviser for the WISE program. “Not everyone feels fantastic about themselves, and they need to have that role model to see that someone has done it before.”

source: http://www.dailycal.org/2012/09/23/uc-berkeley-adopts-mentorship-program-for-women-in-stem-majors/

 

 


NASA Selects Teachers To Fly Student Experiments In Reduced Gravity Aircraft

Teachers from six NASA Explorer Schools (NES) have been selected to receive the 2012 School Recognition Award for their contributions to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.

The teachers selected are from Woodrow Wilson Middle School, Glendale, Calif.; Franke Park Elementary School, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Mountview Road School, Morris Plains, N.J.; Corpus Christi Catholic School, Chambersburg, Pa.; Fairport High School, Fairport N.Y.; and Forest Lake Elementary Technology Magnet School, Columbia, S.C.

In April 2013, three teachers from each school will travel to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. There they will have the opportunity to fly aboard the agency's reduced gravity aircraft and conduct experiments designed by their students. The experiments will examine the acceleration and inertia of objects, how fluids with different viscosities behave in microgravity, and how the absence of gravity affects mass and weight.

"Congratulations to the NES teachers selected for this innovative NASA experience. The reduced gravity flights allow teachers to conduct scientific investigations in a microgravity environment, similar to how experiments are conducted on the International Space Station," said Cecelia Fletcher, acting program manager for primary and secondary education at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "This experiential learning opportunity helps to spread the excitement of STEM education with teachers and students throughout the NASA Explorer School network."

A team of NASA personnel reviewed many applications before selecting these six schools for their exemplary classroom practices and innovative uses of NES resources to engage a broad school population. These schools were chosen from more than 470 schools that are registered participants in the NASA Explorer Schools project.

The NASA Explorer Schools project is the classroom-based gateway for students in grades 4-12 that focuses on stimulating STEM education using agency content and themes.

For more information about the Explorer Schools Project, visit:

http://explorerschools.nasa.gov

To watch a four-minute video that provides project information and shows previous winners aboard the reduced gravity aircraft, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/pjy29I

For more information about NASA's education programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/nasa-selects-teachers-to-fly-student-experiments-in-reduced-gravity-aircraft-2012-09-20

 


Santa Clara Teachers and Industry Join Forces to Promote STEM Education  

Veteran Santa Clara Unified School District teachers Craig Young and Jack Riviere are two of ten Santa Clara teachers who have partnered with Bay Area businesses and universities to work in eight-week summer fellowship programs that, come Fall, will help them inspire their students to pursue the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and math.

Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME) is a consortium of Bay Area organizations that founded the summer fellowship program in 1985 in partnership with the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California at Berkeley. These organizations believe that teachers are the primary agents to inspire and develop the next generation of scientists and engineers.

Thirty-eight organizations are hosting 165 teacher fellows for this 28th summer program.

"Our Learning and Development group participates regularly in the IISME intern program," says Debra Korbel, Silicon Valley Bank technical training manager. "Teachers bring a high level of creativity and thoughtfulness to how they approach learning. We benefit from their fresh perspective as well as their finely-tuned skill level."

"IISME does a wonderful job of helping match teacher skills and interests with corporate needs. Their respect and appreciation for teachers makes working with them a joy," says Jack Riviere, a Cabrillo Middle School teacher for eleven years.

Riviere’s background in online teaching and learning is a good fit for helping to implement Silicon Valley Bank’s new HR system. He credits his positive experience with Silicon Valley Bank and IISME staff, for making "a summer spent ‘working’ surprisingly refreshing."

Craig Young, who has taught physics at Wilcox High School for five years, has a second fellowship in the field of nanotechnology (sometimes called molecular manufacturing) at Stanford University.

"I bring an education perspective to the fellowship. The researchers at Stanford are very interested in how to communicate their work to a larger audience, especially younger students.  They very much want to help develop the pipeline of students interested in pursuing science and engineering degrees. I help the researchers translate their often very complicated and specific work into language and images that will be effective with the general public and teenagers," says Young.

IISME’s Education Transfer Plan helps teachers link their summer work experiences to their teaching.

"I will be able to use my greater proficiency with Adobe Captivate to create more engaging and effective online lessons," says Riviere. "My students will appreciate hearing how a local company has been able to combine technical and pedagogical excellence with high employee morale. Students like to hear about what technical and soft skills will help them be successful in the working world."

"Many teachers look for ways to supplement their incomes during the summer. IISME fellowships provide a generous stipend while offering a chance to do interesting, challenging work that can provide a new perspective for classroom teaching," says Young, one of 25 teachers at Stanford for the summer.

"We're lucky to have the program available in this area and such a wide variety of academic and corporate research labs willing to participate."

Since 1985, IISME has awarded 3,135 Summer Fellowships to K-16 teachers from 672 schools and 123 districts, primarily in the Bay Area. For information, visit www.iisme.org.

source: http://www.santaclaraweekly.com/2012/Issue-32/santa_clara_teachers_and_industry_join_forces_to_promote_stem_education.html

 

 


The Evolution of Ed Tech in Silicon Valley

Over the past few years, every new day has seemed to bring news of another higher-education technology start-up company promising to change the world. According to the National Venture Capital Association, investment in education technology jumped from $100-million in 2007 to nearly $400-million last year. On Easter weekend earlier this year, I flew to Silicon Valley to find out what was going on. The result was a long article in Washington Monthly, called “The Siege of Academe.” (You can read it here.)

I had known some of the reasons for the start-up boom before arriving in California. The world has changed since the first wave of ed-tech start-ups went belly-up in the dot-com bust. Educational tools have become more sophisticated; computing power is cheaper; broadband access and mobile technology have spread.

What I didn’t really understand, until I got there, was how the economics of technology start-ups have also changed.

The company that best embodied the new dynamics of investment was called Imagine K-12. It’s a copy (in valley-speak, a “fast follow”) of a start-up incubation model developed by a firm called Y Combinator, except Imagine K-12 focuses specifically on education. The model works like this: Say you have an idea for a start-up but no idea what to do next. Imagine K-12 brings you in for three months, gives you a chair and table on which to put your MacBook Air, and teaches you the basics—how to build a prototype, craft a business plan, and hone a pitch. They help get the product in front of users for feedback and improvement, and introduce people to angel investors, venture capitalists, and other members of the start-up ecosystem. In exchange, Imagine K-12 gets between 4 and 8 percent equity in the company.

In the old days (that is, 10 years ago), huge and well-capitalized venture-capital firms would simply load a bunch of money into their companies and light a fuse. As the companies tried to generate enough rapid growth to get to an IPO (where, presumably, everyone gets rich) many would flame out. The process put enormous stress on the start-ups, many of which ended up blowing apart on the launching pad. A few big hits would leave the VC’s in the black, but over time people realized that the process could be improved with a more sophisticated manipulation of financial fuel.

At the Imagine K-12 / Y Combinator levels, the initial amounts of money are small, in the range of $25,000 to $50,000. Imagine K-12’s president explained to me that the cost of starting a new company is 10 times less than it used to be. That means investors can spread their money around to more entrepreneurs and ideas. Also, the entrepreneurs themselves can “fail faster,” which is crucial in an ecosystem driven by constant iteration in search of the next great breakout product.

The “fail faster” dynamic has certainly borne itself out. A couple of days ago Twitter informed me that OneSchool, the founders of which make a cameo appearance early in my piece, has already “imploded.” Parker Holcumb, by contrast, whom I described unsuccessfully pitching his mobile app to a venture capitalist, has forged ahead and is now selling his electronic highlighter on iTunes. Doubtless, companies that didn’t even exist in April have already been dreamed up, funded, and passed their prime, while others have already garnered legions of followers and are well on their way to making people rich.

What I don’t think will change are the underlying economic and cultural forces driving the larger trend. It’s not just that the tools, money, and opportunity are there for the taking. It’s also that people living in Silicon Valley are of the mind-set that the education industry is ripe for disruption.

Late in the trip, my guide Michael Staton and I met two men in their 60s at a Greek restaurant in the Financial District. It was the first time we had ventured north of Market Street, into the world of tall buildings and suits. The two men were Stewart Alsop and Tom Kalinske. Alsop was a technology journalist for a number of years before turning to investing. Kalinske ran Sega back when Sega Genesis was the coolest video game console you could buy. Then he went into business with Michael Milken and helped found Knowledge Universe and the popular educational-toy manufacturer, LeapFrog.

Kalinske told me a story about a long time ago, in the 1990s, when Michael Milken was having pretty much exactly the same idea that Silicon Valley people are having now: There are great college professors out there, so why can’t we just videotape their lectures, sell them to people, cut the middlemen colleges out of the deal, and be the middlemen ourselves? They identified Nobel Prize-winning college professors because they are, of course, the best. They sent video teams to the professors and, because this kind of thing that used to cost a lot more money to produce (what with film cameras and so forth), they’d sunk $20-million into the project before realizing that most Nobel Prize winners are by and large really terrible lecturers and that nobody is going to want to pay money to watch them drone on for hours at time. Luckily, they got Thomson publishing to buy the business for $20-million so nobody took a bath, at least on their end. It was a close call.

Then Alsop told his story about education and the Valley. Back in the 80s, he says, he tried to set up a foundation to help education with technology. He went to the meetings where curricula were set and talked to the people who made decisions about education. He came away disappointed and cynical. The system struck him as calcified and absurd. Nothing has happened in the years since to change his mind about that.

That’s pretty much the way people in Silicon Valley see it, which in and of itself doesn’t distinguish them from lots of people everywhere; there is a long tradition in this country of dissatisfaction with our public K-12 education system, along with a much more recent (but growing) movement, led by the likes of Peter Thiel, of dissatisfaction with higher education. The difference is that (and that they, themselves, could make that happen, and reap untold riches in the process). By combining almost unlimited access to capital with the greatest software engineers in the world, they believe they are increasingly able to give prospective students what they want, when they want, in an instant, for free. How and when those forces reach higher education will be one of the fascinating dramas of our time.

Kevin Carey is director of the education-policy program at the New America Foundation.'

source: http://chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2012/09/18/the-evolution-of-ed-tech-in-silicon-valley/

 


Class2Go: Stanford’s New Open-Source Platform For Online Education

The cost of higher education in the U.S. today is ridiculous. Student debt shot north of $1 trillion earlier this year, for example. It’s not surprising, then, that the adoption of web and mobile learning tools is skyrocketing, toppling old modes of learning and creating new ones.

There is no better, more relevant example than “MOOCs,” otherwise known as “massive online open courses.” The buzz around these platforms (think Khan Academy, Coursera) is creating a stir in higher education, as they’ve come to represent a new model of online learning (change) and the promise of quality, affordable education at scale — something that just wasn’t possible five years ago.

As always, when there’s change, something new, there’s also plenty of hype, and uncertainty. No one is really sure whether MOOCs are the future higher education, or whether they’re simply in a period of being over-hyped, before inevitably settling into a supporting role — offering certificates or flair rather than diplomas. But right now, that doesn’t matter.

The experimentation at this early stage is what’s important, as we try to figure out which subjects and learning styles are best suited to their platforms. To their credit, in spite of the uncertainty and their reputation for being intransigent, institutions of higher ed have begun to support and even develop their own MOOC platforms (like MIT, Harvard and UC Berkeley’s joint venture, EdX). But when it comes to actively participating in educational innovation — or at least MOOCs — it seems that few can hold a candle to Stanford.

Again, while Stanford is one of many universities getting on board, the university has long offered courses and lectures online, more recently through iTunes U, and at the end of August, went so far as to create a “Vice Provost of Online Learning” to oversee the integration of web technologies into Stanford’s education. What’s more, popular educational platforms like the well-funded Coursera, the tech-focused, Khan Academy-inspired Udacity and the group-based Venture Lab all either got their start at Stanford or are currently on campus.

And, as of this month, Stanford has added yet another MOOC. While that may seem superfluous, Class2Go is no clone — it’s bringing a unique approach to its online learning platform. Created by eight engineers in Stanford’s CS Department, the not-for-profit service has been designed from the bottom up both for teaching and research, with a focus on portability and interoperability.

To unpack that a little: When Class2Go says it’s portable, it means that it wants to be platform agnostic. Its documents are already portable, its videos already live outside its system on YouTube, its assets can be repurposed as professors see fit and the platform’s exercises and problem sets are in the Khan Academy format (meaning they’re not in a proprietary database) and can be used anywhere.

In terms of interoperability, Class2Go’s website reads, “we don’t want to build or maintain more than we have to,” so it stands on the shoulders of, or relies significantly on, other services to run, like Khan, Piazza, YouTube, Python Django, Amazon AWS, Opscode and Github. Furthermore, designing the platform for both teaching and research means that the platform will leverage data to inform and evolve pedagogy, as well as to give them a glimpse into the efficacy of lessons, teaching style, tech tools, etc.

But the biggest differentiating factor for Class2Go — in case it hasn’t yet become apparent — is its early dedication to building and maintaining a totally open-source platform. This means that the platform aims to be both free of cost and of pricey IP, while professors are free to contribute to Class2Go’s code and get involved in the development of the platform, as well as to collaborate with other institutions and organizations.

And that’s where you start to see what might be Class2Go’s biggest appeal. A big complaint against existing platforms (and really, educational technology as a whole) is that it is more concerned with progress for the sake of progress — even if that means technology replacing teachers (the human kind) altogether.

Instead, the most successful edtech platforms (and this is obviously especially true for MOOCs, given their structure) are those who truly empower teachers, designing their platforms in such a way as to optimize a teacher’s ability to teach effectively, control their content — and engage their students.

The platform does this by making all content created within, regardless of type, property of whoever creates it. Professors can also take advantage of the aforementioned backend, which enables them to track student use, see how students are watching video, when they drop out and what kind of content resonates with them the most, video or slideshows — essentially creating an A/B testing platform for teachers.

For students, the long-term goal is obviously to offer a wide variety of courses and learning experiences. However, the platform is still early in its development (after all, it came together over the course of three months) and hopefully continues to be experimental. Stanford will offer 16 MOOC courses in the fall, two of which will be on Class2Go. The platform’s classes go live on October 8th and include: “An Introduction To Computer Networks” and “Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, & Batteries.”

The other differentiating (and life-saving) factor for Class2Go is that it’s being supported by the university. Compare that to Coursera, which was lucky enough to raise a huge first round for such a young company, but still has to eventually face “Monetization Mountain.” Business models seem to have been the farthest things from mind during the development of Class2Go, and, thanks to Stanford’s support, the team can focus on building a great user experience for professors and students.

Education and monetization have always enjoyed a strained relationship, and is an ever-present pressure over the oft-mission-based edtech startup. So, hopefully, being free from that will allow Class2Go to experiment in ways others may not be able to, and by becoming open source, build a platform that in the end will have greater integrity and more bells and whistles than its closed counterparts. Hopefully, Class2Go (which, by the way, is also working on mobile apps, hence the name) and the other MOOCs in its class will soon be able to move beyond the experimental phase to really begin solving the big

source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/09/17/class2go-stanfords-new-open-source-platform-for-online-education/


Pamela Clute to deliver keynote at STEP Conference

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — American industry is begging for employees with strong skills in science, technology, engineering and math, yet 70 percent of U.S. students who enter college with the intent to major in those STEM fields drop out of school or switch majors within four years according to a 2008 CPEC study. That’s why this year’s Science Technology Education Partnership (STEP) Conference is focusing on young students and their teachers, to try to turn those numbers around.

The STEP Conference is set for Oct. 2-3 at Bourns Technology Center at 1200 Columbia in Riverside, which also houses UC Riverside’s College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT). More than 250 high school students from around Riverside County will get the chance for explore six CE-CERT labs from 1 to 4 p.m. on Oct. 2, learning about research on solar panels, synthetic fuels, atmospheric processes, emissions testing, alternative fuels and ways to create more energy efficient transportation.

UC Riverside and other sponsors provide creative learning opportunities at the conference, especially for Riverside County students and teachers in grades 4-8. The goal is more than just igniting their interest in STEM subjects, said Pamela Clute, a UCR math professor who is also Assistant Vice Chancellor of Educational and Community Engagement and Executive Director of UCR’s ALPHA Center.

Clute, the keynote speaker for the K-12 teacher conference from 3:45 to 6 p.m. on Oct. 3, wants teachers to help their students understand that mastering subjects like algebra I, algebra II and geometry today will open the door to interesting and lucrative STEM careers in the future.

“In the United States, only 33% of college students get a STEM degree, compared to 75% of the college students in China,” said Clute. “In China, the expectations from family, society and the media are that students should excel in STEM subjects, because they understand that doing well in those areas will improve their quality of life and the economic vitality of their country. In the U.S., students think entertainment and sports are the only ways to make it big.”

The 2011-2012 PayScale College Salary Report makes that point plain. The top 10 college majors that lead to high salaries are all STEM subjects—petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, aerospace engineering, computer engineering, physics, applied mathematics, computer science and nuclear engineering.

“Often you hear people ask, ‘How is algebra relevant to my life?’ and I love explaining why,” Clute said. “The satellite that brings reception to your cell phone is often in the shape of a tetrahedron.  This is geometry in action. Your cell phone is a mini computer. It receives all the signals sent to all cell phones in a particular service region. Yet because of signal coding systems, your cell phone only responds to the signals sent to you. This is algebra in action!

“We have to make math more informative by providing the tools and the ideas for enhancing instruction and helping teachers enrich their curriculum. Providing excitement about mathematics at an early age can help kids get over intimidating factors along the way.”

The teacher conference will offer dinner and many hands-on activities. Clute said she wants teachers to leave with lots of stimulating ideas for teaching math and science, “along with a validation that what they do matters and is important work.

 “The instruction has to be relevant,” she said. “I pick something in society, like a cell phone, for instance, and then I talk about the satellites that give us cell phone reception and the importance of the shape of those satellites….that’s all math, and the equations used to design those satellites; that’s algebra.”

Students from all over Riverside County will be visiting the conference to see ways that math and science are applied to research and products. Transportation and other support is being provided by the STEP Conference Board, Bourns Inc., the Riverside County Office of Education and the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce, as well as CE-CERT and UC Riverside’s ALPHA Center, which works with educators to help them become passionate, enthusiastic teachers of math and science.

“I’m a strong believer in making school something wonderful that makes kids want to learn,” Clute said. “We’re teaching math like we taught it 2,500 years ago. We need to make a change to make it more relevant and exciting to kids, and more pertinent to this 21st century global economy. If we don’t do this our students will face an extreme competitive disadvantage and our economic vitality, which depends on quality STEM education, will suffer.”

source: http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/8850

 

 


Top U.S. educator touts technology

REDWOOD CITY -- U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan got his show on the road here Wednesday, hyping the promise of technology to transform education as he embarked on a series of back-to-school pep talks across the country.

In two days in Silicon Valley, Duncan displayed the enthusiasm for change that has marked his 3½ years as educator-in-chief and defended the Obama Administration's relentless push for higher standards and achievement, better teaching, education equity and now, technology in the classroom.

"Our challenge is to make great education the norm," he told an auditorium full of students, teachers and community leaders at Sequoia High School. He lauded the progress at the school, where 51 percent of the students come from poor families and 25 percent are undocumented immigrants, yet 68 percent of juniors and seniors take at least one honor course and nearly all graduates continue to some kind of colleges, according to Principal Bonnie Hansen.

Duncan touted the federal Dream Act, which would allow undocumented students to enroll in college, join the military or legally work. "We can't afford to keep that talent on the sidelines," he said to applause.

In pushing the promise of technology, Duncan and others stressed that digital innovation is not about replacing teachers. Equipping "great teachers with great tools is going to save education," said Catlin Tucker, an English teacher from Windsor High in Sonoma County, who encourages her students to use smartphones for classroom work.

On Tuesday, spending a day at Stanford University with high-tech leaders, Duncan said that education technology pioneers are helping to change the world. Among them are Sal Khan, whose online Khan Academy posts free videos on everything from addition to art history that are used in 15,000 classrooms. Khan, appearing with Duncan at Sequoia on Wednesday, said his goal is "to teach 100 million students in the next five years."

 

Likewise, Stanford professor Andrew Ng has founded a firm, Coursera, offering free, online interactive courses taught by professors at some of the nation's most selective universities. On Wednesday he spoke of an institution where a four-year education costs more than $200,000 and is offering classes for free.

 

Duncan appeared with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, who touted the commission's "Conect2Compete" initiative that aims to offer low-income families with schoolchildren broadband service for $10 a month. The program is expected to start nationwide by January, FCC spokesman Neil Grace said.

 

The messages about expanding educational access resonated with students. "I liked it," said Sequoia senior Juan Valdez, 17, referring to increased online courses. "It's going to be really hard to get money for a four-year college."

 

But the applause for Duncan and his panelists didn't compare with students' rapt attention and cheers for a student-produced music video and for a clip of Printz Board of the Black Eyed Peas, who helped with production.

 

Duncan took questions from the audience via Twitter, and said afterward that he sends his own tweets (he has 53,000 followers). "It's a great way to get feedback," he said, and to reach young people.

 

While his talk Wednesday promoted the promise of technology, on Tuesday evening Duncan touched on the federal agenda for change.

 

He stressed the importance of preschool. "The only way we can stop playing catchup in education is if our babies enter kindergarten ready to learn." And he touted the administration's record of school reform, enticing nearly all states to embrace tougher standards and better performance.

 

He sees teacher training, support, compensation and retention as areas ripe for reform. "The entire teacher pipeline is fundamentally broken," he said. While in high-performing countries like Singapore and Finland, the top 10 percent of college graduates are recruited for teaching; in the United States, two-thirds of the teachers come from the bottom third of their class.

 

Ironically, from the man who has perhaps prodded more change than any education secretary before him, Duncan echoed a criticism often voiced by teachers. Reform, he said, "is way too top down." Administrators should ask teachers what they need to teach better, he said.

 

But, he said, he wants to encourage demand from parents for more educational change. "The biggest critique is we are going too fast. Actually, we are going far, far too slow."

 

source: http://www.mercurynews.com/education/ci_21528594/top-u-s-educator-touts-technology

 

 


UC SAN DIEGO ENGINEERING SCHOOL ADDING HUGE NEW FACILITY

UC San Diego’s already large Jacobs School of Engineering will become even bigger Friday with the opening of an $83 million center whose researchers work in areas ranging from aircraft design to the testing of medical devices, the 3-D printing of blood vessels and creation of all manner of artwork.

The 183,000-square-foot Structural and Materials Engineering (SME) building becomes the third-largest research facility at Jacobs, a nationally ranked engineering school whose enrollment increased by 1,000 students in just the past two years. The center, built almost entirely with public money, is loosely designed after Bauhaus, a German university famous for blending science, engineering and the arts.

“We need this building because we’re still in growth mode,” said Freider Seible, the engineering school’s dean and a structural engineer whose research focuses on bridge design. “In difficult economic times, more students enroll in engineering because there’s still the possibility of a well-paying job at the end of four years.

“And we are bringing together four seemingly disparate disciplines in one place. It will be interesting to see what comes out of that.”

Those disciplines are structural engineering, materials and nanoengineering, medical device research, as well as the visual arts, which broadly includes drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, video and the computer arts.

“I am hopeful that people from the visual arts will help stir the imagination,” Seible said. “Engineering can be nerdy. This could make people more outgoing, creative and imaginative.”

source: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/sep/10/tp-engineering-school-adding-huge-new-facility/

 

 


GameDesk Opens New Game-Based School

GameDesk, an organization that’s developing a variety of game-based learning initiatives, is venturing into new terrain with the opening of a new school and the development of new digital tools, with millions of dollars in funding from both the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and AT&T.

The PlayMaker School, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, will open in Los Angeles on September 7, with 60 students in 6th grade, and will operate as a “school within a school” at New Roads, an independent middle school.

Like Quest to Learn, the game-based school in New York, PlayMaker will incorporate principles of game-based learning into the entire instructional model, but with an additional focus on making and discovering. The goal is to engage students in both high-tech and low-tech games and modular, instructional activities. Individual students will work with an “Adventure Map” that will guide them to choose their own path, allowing for students to control how they learn and when they learn it. These modules will be not only individual tasks, but will also include group work. In a unit on kinetic and potential energy, for example, students will watch videos, play games, create digital roller-coasters, and create real-life models.

With ongoing formative assessments tied not only to the Common Core, but also practical digital skills, collaboration, critical thinking, and social emotion learning principles, the focus is meant to go beyond traditional schooling goals. Instruction will focus on providing context for the content, whereby students understand the relevance of what they’re learning. Teachers will play the roles of questioners, facilitators, and reflective agents.

More information will soon be released about the specifics of the program.

SCALING UP

Lucien Vattel, the executive director of GameDesk, said he wants to scale the company’s tools and learning models to schools and other groups across the country. To that end, the company received $3.8 million from AT&T to fund two new initiatives: a learning laboratory called Learning Center, which will include a “classroom of the future” where new digital tools will be developed, tested, evaluated, and aligned with academic standards; and free access to an online portal of digital learning content, as well as support for teachers to learn how to integrate it.

“We see this as being a clearing house for all the best work in this space and we want the entire education community to contribute content to the site, from the professional developer, to the educator in Kansas, to the creative and tenacious parents and kids at home,” Vattel said.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

As part of the professional development for the PlayMaker School, GameDesk also initiated a collaborative called DreamLab focused on not only creating many of the GameDesk’s projects, but also how to implement and sustain them. Instead of simply creating and implementing, however, they design in collaboration with student and teachers, to ensure that real needs are being met well.

Although still in its infancy as a component of GameDesk’s work, DreamLab hopes to provide professional development for teachers on site. In addition, they hope to build a portal where teachers can collaborate on lesson design and share their ideas for implementing the games in the classroom. In the past months as they prepared for the new school opening, new teachers received intensive professional development, learned to design games, played games, and understood the pedagogical principles around using games for learning.

GAMES IN STEM

GameDesk is also creating and collaborating on games that target the Common Core standards. Mathmaker, which GameDesk created, is focused on having students take on the roles of engineers to learn math concepts. This game, as well as others, is directed at amplifying STEM curriculum, and is being piloting and used in large urban high schools.

GameDesk also uses another math-focused game called Motion Math In-Class, created by the team at Stanford University Learning, Design and Technology Program, which is part of its math curriculum. This interactive iPad app helps students learn fractions, proportions and percentages.

Another unique game is Dojo, which uses play and biometrics to work on emotion regulation (not to be confused with Class Dojo, which helps teachers with classroom management). So far, it has been used successfully with diverse populations and even youth within or exiting the juvenile justice system. Players experience real-life challenges that test their emotions, but also gives them strategies and feedback on how to overcome these challenges.

source: http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/09/a-new-game-based-school-opens/

 

 


Chevron's Fuel Your School Program Expands to Support Nine Communities Across the U.S.

Chevron U.S.A. Inc. announced the expansion of its Fuel Your School program to nine communities this fall from two communities in 2011. Fuel Your School will provide useful funding for eligible classroom projects developed by public school teachers and posted to DonorsChoose.org in the following communities:

-- Alameda and Contra Costa counties, California

-- Orange County, California

-- Kern County, California

-- Sacramento County, California

-- St. Tammany, Orleans and Plaquemines parishes, Louisiana

-- Jackson County, Mississippi

-- Multnomah County, Oregon

-- Harris County, Texas

-- Salt Lake and Davis counties, Utah

Chevron will donate $1 for every eight gallon or larger fill up from Oct. 1 to Oct. 31 at participating Chevron and Texaco stations in those communities, up to a total contribution of nearly $5 million.

"Educating today's students remains critical to our country's future, but America's schools face significant challenges and have fallen behind in science, technology, engineering and math," said Dale Walsh, president of Chevron Americas Products. "Fuel Your School provides teachers with essential tools and resources that help students learn, explore and get excited about STEM education to help prepare them for the jobs of tomorrow."

The program is an innovative collaboration with DonorsChoose.org, an online charity to help students in need. All year, public school teachers across the U.S. post classroom project requests on DonorsChoose.org, ranging from pencils to microscope slides and even live tarantulas for use with biology lessons.

"Teachers spend more than $350 of their own money every year on materials for their students," said Charles Best, CEO of DonorsChoose.org. "Our site enables public school teachers to post projects for funding from their community and companies like Chevron who want to improve students' education."

The lack of adequate school funding across the nation has become so dire that some teachers do not have basic supplies to help students complete their classroom assignments. During the last school year, public school teachers shared more than 100,000 requests on the DonorsChoose.org website. One of those requests came from Ms. Lim-Breitbart, who teaches high school physics at Aspire California College Preparatory Academy in Berkeley, Calif., but lacked the resources to provide students with hands-on scientific activities. With the help of the Fuel Your School program, she and her students received digital thermometers and hot plates to use during physics lessons.

"[The] donation helped change our classroom from 'getting by' to 'doing real science' this year," said Lim-Breitbart. Students now believe that "science is a real option for them in the future."

Chevron partners with local communities, governments and non-profit organizations to increase learning opportunities for students and support the social and economic vitality of communities where the company has significant business operations. Chevron has contributed nearly $100 million for education in the U.S. over the past three years.

Since its inception in 2010, Fuel Your School has funded more than 3,000 classroom projects at nearly 600 schools, and the program has grown each year to support students in additional communities. Public school teachers and other educators are invited to post eligible projects starting on September 1 to www.DonorsChoose.org, for possible funding as part of the Fuel Your School program.

Consumers can track the classroom projects in need of funding and see how much money is being earned for public schools in each city by visiting www.FuelYourSchool.com. Donations earned through Fuel Your School will be used to fund eligible classroom projects from Oct. 2 through Nov. 30, 2012, or until funds generated by this program have been exhausted by eligible projects. Consumers and Chevron employees may also independently fund classroom projects on the DonorsChoose.org website by making separate, individual donations.

source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/chevrons-fuel-your-school-program-expands-to-support-nine-communities-across-the-us-2012-09-05?siteid=nbkh 


Nvidia, Agilent and other Silicon Valley tech companies boost STEM education through teacher internships
I've heard it over and over, since I started asking what it takes to get kids, particularly kids living challenging lives, to embrace science, math, engineering and technology:
Get science, math and the rest of it in front of them. Show kids what the disciplines can do when unleashed in the real world.
Brittany Wenger, the Florida high school kid who won Google's (GOOG) recent global science fair, started this particular meme for me when I talked to her after her big victory. "If kids are exposed, they're more likely to find their true passion," Wenger says, "to be able to do whatever they want with science, rather than being forced into it."
In other words: Show. Don't tell.
And so wouldn't it make sense to better arm teachers with the experiences they need to show kids how science, technology, engineering and math are used in every day life? An obscure Silicon Valley outfit called Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education, thinks so. For 28 years, the Santa Clara nonprofit, better known as IISME, has been pairing teachers with universities and tech companies in the valley to give teachers a chance to see how principles and ideas they teach in the classroom are translated into real world products and initiatives.
The teachers typically spend eight weeks of their summers working for a local company (the program recently expanded modestly in Southern California) and the company pays them and kicks into a fund that provides teachers with $1,000 grants to launch new STEM lesson plan at their schools.
This summer 165 teachers are interning at 38 companies or schools. And yes, says Jennifer Bruckner, the program's executive director, the project does strive to reach teachers who teach kids facing challenges. For instance, she says, more than a third of the program's teachers work at schools that are struggling academically or serve poor neighborhoods. She only wishes IISME could do more. It turned away 300 teachers this year, for lack of industry slots.
"Our biggest restriction is needing more organizations to come on board," she says.
 
Andrea Hutchison, who teaches at Milpitas High School's Digital Business Academy, is one of the lucky ones. She landed a spot this summer at Nvidia, researching the different ways the graphics chipmaker's customers use its speedy processors. The work has opened her eyes to the processors' applications in heart surgery, air traffic control, military surveillance, facial recognition and more.
 
"That's kind of my goal," Hutchison says, "to take this back to my classroom. I want to show them what I've learned, how the technology is used in all different areas."
 
Hutchison says shifting gears to a different kind of work is invigorating. Ideas bubble up from conversations and from looking at the world in a different way. "I feel like when I go back into the classroom, I'm going to be more motivated," she says.
 
It's like planting a seed, a science and technology-loving seed that spreads enthusiasm to students. Bruckner says that through the years the summer program has enrolled more than 3,000 teachers from 670 schools. Those teachers, she says, have reached two million students.
 
"Kids are really inspired by teachers who have experienced the practical applications and who have worked side-by-side with scientists and engineers who can give them authentic stories," Bruckner says.
 
David Hall, a chemistry and forensic science teacher at Sacred Heart Preparatory in Atherton, has been collecting his authentic stories at Agilent, where he is working in the molecular detection lab.
 
"I'm very happy to go into the classroom and share my experiences with students," Hall says. "I can tell them that I've been doing something really cool."
 
And lest you think IISME interns get stuck with busy work, it so happens that Hall is working on a product in development that neither he nor his mentor, Carl Myerholtz, can say too much about. Hall will say that his work will lead to a three-day lesson plan covering liquid solutions and chromatography and work with a mass spectrometer.
 
My guess? Some kid at Sacred Heart is going to hear "mass spectrometer" for the first time. And after that, it will be a thought that she simply won't be able to get out of her head.
 

source: http://www.mercurynews.com/mike-cassidy/ci_21273923/cassidy-nvidia-agilent-stem-education-internships-tech


Monta Vista, Lynbrook offering new course in STEM education
Students within the Fremont Union High School District wishing to further their studies through independent research can now get school credit for their work.
The district approved a new independent study course in July that focuses on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).
The development of the course was a natural fit for the district, which is home to nationally recognized science research by both teachers and students. Every year, a large group of students enter regional, state and national science competitions.
Most recently and prominently, Angela Zhang of Monta Vista High School won a $100,000 scholarship for her cancer research in the 2011 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology. Zhang's prize-winning research studied the use of nanotechnology to eradicate cancer stem cells.
The district also sees students do well in the annual Intel Science Talent Search contest. This year there was one semifinalist from Monta Vista and two from Lynbrook High.
In 2011, Cupertino High School had its first finalist, Chelsea Voss, to go along with four finalists at Lynbrook. In 2010, finalists Raman Nelakanti and David Liu, both Lynbrook High students, went all the way to the talent search finals in Washington, D.C. Liu was awarded second place nationally and won $75,000 for his development of a system that can recognize and search catalog digital images.
Because of budget constraints, it would have been impossible to add the STEM course without help from the Fremont Union High School District Foundation, according to Kate Jamentz, academic deputy superintendent.
The foundation will fund two sections of the course for the 2012-13 school year, one at Monta Vista and one at Lynbrook, where there is already notable student participation and teachers experienced in supporting such projects.
The foundation also agreed to fund the participation of interested teachers from all FUHSD schools in the IISME Research Collaborative, which aims to support teachers interested in teaching research.
 
"We have a lot of students, probably more than most districts, go out and do research projects on their own," Jamentz said. "We will start at those two schools, but we have teachers throughout the district participating in IISME thinking about how to incorporate the course either in classes or science clubs."
The new course would ideally target freshman looking to build their researching skills, but the schools will take sophomores in the first year.
 
Up to 40 students a year could sign up for the course to learn to design and implement a research project with the support of a mentor. Students would receive 10 elective credits, but the course would not replace any math or science course or fulfill science requirements.
 
Although the course will be offered only at Monta Vista and Lynbrook, the district would eventually like to branch out to other schools.
 
"The real goal is to support inquiry and research in science," Jamentz said.
 
"Right now, we wanted to get it off the ground. We'll see how it evolves at each school."
 
  

 


Low-income kids of color SMASH into math and science at Stanford, Berkeley, UCLA, USC

 

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