jim brazell's blog

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Accelerate STEM Innovation with FREE Ed Tech Tools

It is generally accepted that one can not design education today to prepare young people and adults for the future because we do not know what the future will be. Today, technology has zoomed past schools, industry, government, consumers and civil society. The modern world needs a new way, or more accurately, an old way of seeing technology. 

The question is not whether we can design for the future; rather, the question is: Can we update antiquated practice more closely aligned to what is emerging today in our own backyards?

 

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It Takes a Village to Educate a Child

The economy is the single most important issue for a sizable majority of voters in the 2012 presidential race according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News Poll. Similarly, U.S. competitiveness, entrepreneurship, and innovation are the hot topics in politics and business. On Wednesday, January 18, 2012, Harvard released a survey of approximately 10,000 alumni, from the  Harvard Competitiveness project, indicating American competitiveness will decline over the next three years, according to 71% of those surveyed.

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Why STEM ?

 

"Why should policy makers, educators, school board members and students care about the arts and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)?" The Art of the Future is the book written by Jim Brazell in response to this question asked of him by the National School Boards Association (NSBA). Debra Amidon, the creator of the concept of knowledge innovation says in her foreword to the book: “The Art of the Future


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The Future of Ed Tech Markets

FIRST ALLIANCE represents a system of learning connecting experience, simulation, play, design, art, culture, philosophy, inventiveness, and experimentation. The Atlanta GENIUS and other FIRST ALLIANCE competitors are reflecting the future to us today.


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The Art of the Future

These are stories of high school students and teachers (and public and private partners acting through networks) to do “real world” scientific research and development (R&D) and engineering design. This is the new face of advanced technological education in America’s high schools and community colleges. Job profiles are provided by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education initiative.


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