Michigan Technological University and Bay de Noc Community College Collaborate to Prep Students for Industry

How can one educational program teach all the skill sets industry requires? Michigan Tech has designed a way.

Industry is not a monolith.  One employer needs to hire people with electrical skills. Another is looking for employees who understand fluid power systems.  A third needs someone who can read blueprints. How can one educational program meet all their needs?

Partnering with Bay de Noc Community College and funded by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Labor, state agencies and industry, Michigan Technological University has helped craft an educational program to meet industry’s needs. It’s an initiative in industrial automation, robotics and controls to help students earn credentials from certificates to associate degrees to bachelor’s degrees. The development of the tools and curriculum will prepare Michigan Tech students to join the workforce.  

Michigan Tech

$75,000 per Year with Benefits; No College Needed

Miami is a city with an ever changing skyline. And those who make it happen — the plumbers, electricians, brick masons and carpenters — earn far above the local median: $55,000-75,000 a year with full benefits and a pension.

But as the economy barrels toward full employment, local contractors are struggling to find enough skilled workers to fuel the construction boom.

“We’re seeing it across the board. There are shortages in every trade,” said Peter Dyga, president of the South Florida-based Florida East Coast Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors, a non-profit trade organization comprised of several construction firms and contractors.

Associated Builders and Contractors

President Trump Establishes Workforce Council and Signs Career and Technical Education Bill Into Law

President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order (E.O. 13845) establishing the President’s National Council for the American Worker. The council – co-chaired by the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Labor, the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, and the Advisor to the President overseeing the Office of Economic Initiatives – will develop recommendations for a national strategy that fosters coordination, cooperation, consistency, and information exchange among federal and local government entities, private industry, and non-profit organizations to empower American workers. Ten other federal officials will comprise the council including the Directors of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Within 180 days of the executive order, the council must develop a national campaign and recommendations to create and promote workforce development strategies that provide education and skills-based training. The intent is to prepare youth and adults for the jobs of today and of the future.