Dual Mission Education Institutes in Higher Education

As higher education faces declining enrollment numbers, reduced state funding, and accusations that it is elitist and out of reach for many Americans, university presidents, chancellors, and system heads from Wisconsin, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Arkansas, and Utah, discussed new and innovative models of education that are addressing some of higher ed’s greatest challenges and the shortage of skilled workers. The dual education model can help universities save costs by sharing staff, faculty and infrastructure (it is essentially two schools for the price of one) and keep tuition low. It also allows students who start on a community college track to easily transfer their credits if they choose to continue their studies towards an advanced degree, and to do so much more seamlessly than if they were to transfer to a different school. Additionally, its open admissions policy means more underrepresented populations are getting a shot at a degree in higher education. 

The summit was hosted by Utah Governor Gary Herbert, the Utah State Board of Regents and UVU President Matthew Holland

With higher education increasingly in the cross-hairs, the summit provided a lively and timely debate on the future of higher ed and how to provide improved access to quality programs for students across the spectrum of need and opportunity. The following are transcripts from the conversation and links to the video.


Preparing the Workforce to Adapt and Work Collaboratively with Robotic Solutions

Manufacturing in the U.S will build on its current strength by using “technology to empower American potential and ingenuity," according to the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM).

The institute, which is a member of Manufacturing USA, a network of regional institutes, looks to robotics to bring about the change. Robotics can “elevate, not eliminate the human roles in manufacturing,” ARM says.

The group’s mission is to help train the future workforce for the high-value careers that will determine the future of manufacturing. And it focuses on lowering the economic, technical, and operational barriers that companies experience in trying to adopt robotic technology.

Advance Robotics for Manufacturing

High School Programs Join Welding Students with Jobs in Demand

Welding labs at Elgin and Hampshire high schools now are certified testing facilities -- the first in the Midwest and among only three high schools in the country to be accredited.

Both programs are sanctioned by the American Welding Society, allowing students and community members to obtain professional certification meeting industry standards. Courses will be taught by AWS-certified instructors at the high schools.

"There is a huge demand for manufacturing grade, entry-level welders in this area," said Nick Moran, certified welding instructor at Elgin High and technical specialist for Kane County. He will train teachers at both high schools this summer to become certified welding instructors.