IBM Expands New Collar Career Partnerships with U.S. Community Colleges

America’s largest technology employer is expanding partnerships with numerous community colleges in the United States to better prepare more Americans for “New Collar” career opportunities. In these well-paying roles, in-demand technology skills are valued more than credentials, and a traditional four-year college degree may not always be required. In addition to collaborating on curricula design for next generation IT skills, IBM will work with community colleges near its major U.S. facilities to offer more local students the opportunity to participate in internships and apprenticeships within the company, as well as direct hiring for IBM careers. This initiative will grow over the next six months to include more than a dozen schools in or near communities such as Columbia, MO; Rocket Center, WV; Dubuque, IA; Boulder, CO; Poughkeepsie, NY; Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX and Houston, TX. With this initiative, IBM is working to expand technology career opportunities in areas that traditionally have been underserved by high-tech employers.

 


How Schools are Leveraging Micro-Credentials and Badges

School systems nationwide are increasingly using meaningful credentials and badges to recognize students and educators alike. CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking) issued a report titled Micro-Credentials and Badges: Competency-Based Recognition for Learning, which examines this innovative trend-and how schools are leveraging these distinctions to expand student skills and encourage professional development in modern learning settings.

"Micro-credentials and badges are powerful ways to recognize the achievements of students, teachers and administrators," said Keith Krueger, CEO of CoSN. "More and more districts are incorporating these efforts into their curriculum to advance learning outcomes and professional development."

Michigan Tackles the Challenges of Skills and Educator Gap

At the direction of Gov. Rick Snyder and the goals and strategies set forth by the Building Michigan’s 21st Century Economic report and the 21st Century Michigan Education Commission, we’re taking a holistic approach to elevating all pathways to good-paying careers in Michigan, especially those in the professional trades. We need to close our state’s talent gap, caused, in part, by a career awareness gap. Too many students are unaware of, and don’t always have access to, all the pathways leading to rewarding and good-paying careers.