Brigadier General Ben Robinson Praises Teachers

Teachers Give Kids the Chance to Improve Their Lives, Teach Kids to Understand American Society and Train them to be Valuable Workers.

When you think about that, it’s about having quality of life, having the opportunity to understand what a great country this is and how you participate in it. And finally, to be able to do a good job for someone who is paying you.

General Robinson say’s today’s students need four important skill sets:

·         Knowledge-based skills drawn from their formal education

·         Technical Skills

·         Soft Skills (employability skills)

·         Opportunity Skills (knowledge of personal finance and appreciation of arts and culture)

 Students are willing to take challenging classes if they are properly motivated, but motivation requires relevance. And so-called relevant classes must include paths to possible careers.

Remember, you educate for quality of life, quality of opportunity and workforce. So why not have industry members come and speak to you about careers? Because what it does is it creates relevance, and relevance creates opportunity or the opportunity for rigor. And rigor gives you the opportunity to have advanced degrees and build a great America.


Time to Reinforce the Building Blocks of The American Dream

Successful nations, just like successful businesses, are built on three things: people, education and ideas. 

By opening our nation’s doors to people ready to build new lives and abide by the Constitution, the U.S. has become a stronger, more vibrant nation. By investing heavily in public education, the nation transformed both natives and newcomers into literate, numerate Americans ready to contribute to an advanced industrial economy. And by investing in scientific research, the nation combined and advanced new ideas — many from these new Americans — in new ways to build the most productive, prosperous nation the world has even seen.

However, these three pillars of the American dream — people, education and the investment in scientific research that is the wellspring of new ideas, new capabilities and new products — are all endangered.


A New U: Faster + Cheaper Alternatives to College

Every year, the cost of a four-year degree goes up, and the value goes down. But for many students, there’s a better answer. 

So many things are getting faster and cheaper. Movies stream into your living room, without ticket or concession-stand costs. The world’s libraries are at your fingertips instantly, and for free. 

So why is a college education the only thing that seems immune to change? Colleges and universities operate much as they did 40 years ago, with one major exception: they’ve gotten dramatically more expensive. And they’ve actually gotten slower, with the average time to graduate now over five years. 

As a result, graduates often struggle with enormous debt burdens. Even worse, they often find that degrees did not prepare them to obtain and succeed at good jobs in growing sectors of the economy. Parents and students have accepted this because a college degree has been seen as a prerequisite to a professional career. But now, for the first time, there are real alternatives. 

A New You