Building/Construction

Michigan Tackles the Challenges of Skills and Educator Gap

At the direction of Gov. Rick Snyder and the goals and strategies set forth by the Building Michigan’s 21st Century Economic report and the 21st Century Michigan Education Commission, we’re taking a holistic approach to elevating all pathways to good-paying careers in Michigan, especially those in the professional trades. We need to close our state’s talent gap, caused, in part, by a career awareness gap. Too many students are unaware of, and don’t always have access to, all the pathways leading to rewarding and good-paying careers.


BUILDS ACT - Building U.S. Infrastructure by Leveraging Demands for Skills

Act to ensure that workers are prepared with the skills needed for jobs—in fields such as construction, transportation and energy—that would be created by a major investment in infrastructure. Legislators on both sides of the aisle, have expressed support for a significant infrastructure plan to fix the country’s crumbling roads and bridges.

 

A recent study by the Center of Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University estimated that a $1 trillion infrastructure investment would create 11 million new jobs. Of these jobs, nearly half would require skilled job training beyond a high school level. The BUILDS Act promotes partnerships made up of local businesses and industry organizations, workforce boards, labor representatives and education and training providers to support workforce training programs in infrastructure-related jobs.


Academic Test Mandates Hurt the Need to Train Future Tradesmen

Requiring that high school students spend more hours in classrooms to meet “academic standards” sacrifices, and has clearly impacted, the dire need to give students more opportunities to learn a trade. We’re talking producing more carpenters, welders, plumbers, electricians, masons, mechanics, woodworkers, and other skilled craftsmen.

And while we’re encouraged by state and federal legislation to enhance career and technical education — formerly known as vocational-technical education, or vo-tech — it’s also clear that nothing will change unless the powers-that-be at the state and U.S. Departments of Education accede to the change and stop forcing local school districts to adhere to their “academics first” policies or else.

Reskilling America: Learning to Labor in the 21st Century

After decades of off-shoring and downsizing that have left blue collar workers obsolete, the United States is now on the verge of an industrial renaissance. We don't have a skilled labor pool to fill the positions that will be created, which are technically demanding and require specialized skills. A decades-long series of idealistic educational policies with the expressed goal of getting every student to go to college has left a generation of potential workers out of the system. Touted as a progressive, egalitarian institution providing opportunity even to those with the greatest need, the American secondary school system has deepened existing inequalities.

Reskilling America

DOE, DOT, DOL Report CTE Needs for Transportation Industry Through 2022

U.S. departments of Education, Transportation, and Labor jointly released the report Strengthening Skills Training and Career Pathways Across the Transportation Industry. It examines six transportation subsectors as they will manifest themselves up to 2022: trucking transportation, highway construction and maintenance, transit and ground passenger transportation, rail transportation, air transportation, and maritime transportation. Projections from the data available and anticipated developments suggest the following workforce trends:

•The transportation industry faces major demographic challenges in filling its workforce needs from a combination of factors, including job growth and separations (retirements, transfers to other occupations, and other turnovers).
•The transportation industry will need to hire about 4.6 million workers through 2022.

Careers in Construction Month in Oklahoma Connects CareerTech Schools with National Center for Construction Education and Research

Gov. Mary Fallin proclaimed October as Careers in Construction Month in Oklahoma, and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education is highlighting both its training programs and opportunities in construction. Through 2022, the need for workers in all areas of construction is expected to grow: carpenters by 24 percent, bricklayers and masons by 36 percent, electricians by 20 percent, plumbers and pipefitters by 21 percent and heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics and installers by 21 percent. In addition, forecasters predict that Oklahoma will need almost 3,000 more construction laborers by 2022.

"Opportunities in construction aren’t just on the way, however; they are here now. More than 50 construction companies in Oklahoma say they are hiring workers in construction trades," said Allen Stolhand, trade and industrial education program specialist at ODCTE.
OKCareerTech

Companies Struggling to Recruit, Train Skilled Workers in New England

After being laid off from a sheet metal factory, Rob Pedrosa at age 32 returned to the classroom.Pedrosa lost his job in July of last year and couldn’t find another one. So the Beverly man signed up for training at the North Shore Career Center, where he hoped to pick up skills demanded by high-tech manufacturers who are struggling to find workers.

“The skills I had just weren’t transferable to electronics,” he said. “So I had to reinvent myself.” After seven months of electrical engineering classes at North Shore Community College, he landed a job with Krohne Inc. in Peabody, where he assembles components for water and sewer meters. With the economy rebounding, the job market is improving and employers across the state are hunting for new blood. But their jobs outmatch the skills of many prospective candidates — a gap that the state and businesses hope to fill with training and vocational programs.

Wheeling High School - Learning Manufacturing Skills

Javier Tamayo works at Bridgestone right out of high school, after learning many of his skills at Wheeling High School's innovative manufacturing program, Tamayo, 19, landed the $12-an-hour job last year, and is on his way to a career that pays upwards of $80,000 a year. Wheeling (IL) has been turning out hire-ready manufacturing workers like Tamayo for six years. It's one of a growing number of U.S. high schools that have launched or revived manufacturing programs in recent years to guide students toward good-paying jobs and help fill a critical shortage of skilled machinists, welders and maintenance technicians.


Green Ribbon School Nominations

“We are excited about the potential impact the Green Ribbon Schools awards program can have in encouraging schools to improve their energy efficiency, create healthy environments for students and staff, and enhance their work to effectively prepare graduates for 21st century careers,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. The U.S.


Dearth of interest among young people in many blue-collar trades

The National Aviation Academy in Clearwater, Fla., graduated 235 new aircraft mechanics in June and, of those that passed their federal license exams, more than 95% are now working in the field. "There are so many jobs and there are more coming," says Angeline Capriotti, director of career services at NAA. Yet the school has had trouble building interest among young people, despite boosting its high school recruiting team in the last two years. Americans 25 and under face one of the toughest job markets in modern history.


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