Design

IBM Expands New Collar Career Partnerships with U.S. Community Colleges

America’s largest technology employer is expanding partnerships with numerous community colleges in the United States to better prepare more Americans for “New Collar” career opportunities. In these well-paying roles, in-demand technology skills are valued more than credentials, and a traditional four-year college degree may not always be required. In addition to collaborating on curricula design for next generation IT skills, IBM will work with community colleges near its major U.S. facilities to offer more local students the opportunity to participate in internships and apprenticeships within the company, as well as direct hiring for IBM careers. This initiative will grow over the next six months to include more than a dozen schools in or near communities such as Columbia, MO; Rocket Center, WV; Dubuque, IA; Boulder, CO; Poughkeepsie, NY; Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX and Houston, TX. With this initiative, IBM is working to expand technology career opportunities in areas that traditionally have been underserved by high-tech employers.

 


FIU Teaches Manufacturing Disciplines to Engineering Students

Among the more than 30,000 students attending renowned Florida International University (FIU) in Miami are some 4,000 young men and women pursuing degrees in various disciplines of engineering.  A required course for the mechanical engineering majors is Manufacturing Processes, located in the University’s Engineering Manufacturing Center, a focal point for Civil, Mechanical, Biomedical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as Engineering Management majors.   It is here that they roll up their sleeves and get into the practical side of advanced manufacturing under the guidance of the Center’s coordinator and instructor Richard Zicarelli.

 

FIU Manufacturing

Students are a (Plasma) Cut Above with CAD/CAM

The students in Dale Sunderman’s shop classes at Oregon’s Stayton High School are so busy cutting, pressing, milling and welding unique projects they wish there were more hours in a school day. The courses begin with Manufacturing 1 and include the basics in shop safety, sheet metal work, drill press, lathe and mill operations and automated manufacturing. Here, the students get their feet wet in CAD (Computer Aided Design) and CAM (Computer Aided Machining) operations. After a basic fabrication class, students enter Advanced Manufacturing, where they hone their skills in MIG and TIG welding, as well as industry-oriented CNC programming and machining. “It is at this level and in the Independent Studies Manufacturing course,” says Sunderman, “that the more eager students really begin to stand out. Their projects even capture the interest of the surrounding community.”
 
Stayton HS, MasterCAM

Mastercam University Prepares Machine Shop Teacher to Stay Ahead of Computer-Savvy Students

When Gene Hickey began teaching the art of machining in 1977, computer-aided manufacturing wasn’t a part of the curriculum. The Atari 2600 video gaming system was introduced that same year and, at $265 was a luxury for most households.  When Hickey decided to return to the classroom in 2006 – after a 15-year hiatus – he entered an environment where his students were computer-literate, having grown up using gaming systems that had gone mainstream with graphics that rivaled those in animated films.

Mastercam University

The Manufacturing Institute and eduFACTOR Partner to Engage Teachers and Students with Cutting Edge Technology

The Manufacturing Institute, the non-profit affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers, is pleased to announce a new Dream It. Do It. collaboration with Edge Factor’s eduFACTOR. Dream It. Do It. is a national network that works to change the perception of the industry and engage next-generation workers to pursue manufacturing careers. eduFACTOR is a membership-based library of media and interactive resources used by educators to inspire youth.

With this new collaboration of two powerful networks, teachers will have the opportunity to access technology and career pathways videos, CNC and 3D printing projects, event kits, virtual field trips, interactive classroom and STEM activities, CTE training success videos, and other tools to help reach parents and students across the country.

Lowe's Gives $1.5 Million to Support Career and Technical Education Programs Through Local SkillsUSA Chapters

Lowe's, the largest corporate donor in SkillsUSA history, has renewed its partnership with a $1.5 million commitment to the organization, bringing Lowe's and the Lowe's Charitable and Educational Fondation's total contributions to SkillsUSA to nearly $14 million since 2006.

The SkillsUSA Foundation will use the funds to help students and their technical skill instructors through several grant programs for SkillsUSA chapters and state associations. Local school grants will support local community service projects as well as state-level TeamWorks competitions. Lowe's will also support the SkillsUSA Championships, the nation's largest workforce development event and skill competition as well as student leadership development through the SkillsUSA Chapter Excellence Program.

BRYAN SETSER NAMED CHIEF DESIGN OFFICER OF MATCHBOOK LEARNING; SPEARHEADING DESIGN AND ROLL-OUT OF “MATCHBOOK ACCELERATOR”

Bryan Setser, a highly acclaimed educator and leader in the design of next generation learning models, has been named Chief Design Officer of Matchbook Learning, a national non-profit organization committed to the transformation of public schools in America.

               The Matchbook model, currently being used in Matchbook operated charter schools in Detroit and Newark, is based on an innovative personalized learning methodology supported with extensive teacher training and a powerful learning technology platform called Spark.

Dr. Setser will lead the effort to design and build Matchbook’s unique platform and experience into a “Matchbook Accelerator,” a program that enables schools and districts around the country to utilize Matchbook’s tools, technology and expertise and train their own teams to transform schools using the Matchbook method.

He will also design tools and processes to further refine Matchbook’s process and further enhance the learning experience at the schools Matchbook operates.

Sajan George, Matchbook’s CEO, said: “Bryan has been nationally recognized as one of the leading innovators in designing new learning models that help schools succeed and help children gain the tools they need to compete in the 21st Century economy.” 


Student and Teacher Create Business Around 3D Printing

Mark Holstrom was driving trucks for a living and contemplating a change of career path more than six years ago. During an off hour, Holstrom said he caught an episode of Conan O’Brien in which the host was showing a digital face made from a three-dimensional printer.The Bossier City man’s interest was piqued, but at the time he didn’t know just how much digital art would impact his future. A few years later, Holstrom was enrolled at Bossier Parish Community College studying graphics engineering when he met his future business partner, Mark Hopper. Hopper was a teacher at BPCC and both shared an interest in the school’s 3D printer. “I did a couple of projects at BPCC, and from there Matt and I decided we needed to start this company because it’s growing and it’s not going to go away,” Holstrom said.


CAD/CAM "Rocks" at Macomb Community College

When Gary Walters, Professor of Applied Technology at Macomb Community College, rocks out on his beautiful electric guitar, he has the satisfaction of knowing it is one of many created by his talented students. Walters is part of the Applied Technology & Apprenticeship department and runs the advanced manufacturing program, known as ATAP (Applied Technology Advanced Processes). “I developed this program in 2004,” says Walters, “after meeting Bob Skodzinsky from Haas who said if we updated our curriculum, Haas would provide the CNC machines. We became a Haas Technical Education Center (HTEC) and never looked back. This put us on the map with regard to hiring interest from manufacturing companies in the region.” Macomb offers fourteen courses related to CNC, including basic G and M code programming, machine setup and operation, and Computer Assisted Machining (CAM) programming. Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree, as well as two coveted certificates, CNC Machinist (entry-level operator), and CAM Technologist (entry-level programmer). Their 4,000-square-foot shop area contains manual mills, lathes and surface grinders for teaching the basics, in addition to five Haas CNC machining centers, three Haas CNC turning centers, two EDM machines, two 3D rapid prototyping printers (Fused Deposition Modeling), an Epilog laser engraver, a Zoller offline tool pre-setter, and a hand-held scanner for reverse engineering. “In addition to the machines we own,” says Walters, “Haas entrusts machines to us, currently a machining center and a live tooling turning center.”

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MTConnect Student Challenge Sponsored by Association for Manufacturing Technology and Office of the Secretary of Defense

College students with an interest in bringing together software and hardware solutions to improve manufacturing operations now have an opportunity to leverage their creativity and innovative know-how through the MTConnect Student Challenge, a competition that invites submissions for both ideas and applications utilizing the MTConnect standard. The MTConnect Student Challenge is offering a total of $33,000 in cash prizes for winning submissions. MTConnect is an open-source, XML-based communications standard that fosters connectivity between manufacturing equipment and devices. This Challenge builds on the success of previous competitions that sought submissions from industry professionals related to the use of MTConnect. The MTConnect Student Challenge is open to community college and university students at the undergraduate and graduate level and may be of particular interest to students who are studying manufacturing-related fields; electrical, mechanical or industrial engineering; as well as software engineering and IT-related studies. http://www.challenge.gov/challenge/mtconnectstudentideas/


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