Standards

Measuring CTE Outcomes - Trained, Credentialed, Placed

Without outcomes, CTE is just another elective,” said Dr. Sally Downey, superintendent of the East Valley Institute of Technology, which provides over 40 CTE programs for high school students and adults.

“CTE outcomes shouldn’t be difficult to measure,” Downey said. “Did the student complete their program and earn an industry credential or license? Did they get a job related to their CTE program? Did they go to college or join the military? All of those things are measureable. But the devil is always in the details, especially when those details involve taxpayer dollars and politics.”

In 2013, the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University published what many considered to be the first comprehensive look at CTE in the Grand Canyon state.


Secretary Devos at U.S. Space Center - "Rethink School" Tour

For more than 50 years, the George Marshall Space Flight Center has helped design and build the engines, vehicles, and space instruments that make possible what was thought impossible. And Alabama’s own U.S. Space & Rocket Center inspires young campers to embark on missions of science and discovery.

For students across America, the summer break is well over. Classes and homework have resumed. Learning has resumed.

But have you ever stopped to wonder why America's schools close for three months? Do hospitals close? Or grocery stores? Your favorite restaurant? Why does "the system" gear learning to "the school year"? Within artificial boundaries? Within parameters? Within limits?


Perkins Act - Changes and Opportunities - Including STEM

While the measure was signed into law on July 31, 2018, Perkins V will go into effect on July 1, 2019.

Over the next few months, states will be writing transition plans, which will cover the first year of the law’s implementation (July 1, 2019- June 30, 2020). Full four-year state and local plans, covering all the requirements of the act, will be submitted in spring 2020 (encompassing program years July 1, 2020-June 30, 2024).

The law would authorize $1.229 billion for FY 2019 and gradually increase this authorization level to $1.318 billion in FY 2024, which represents a 10.57 percent increase over the course of the act compared to the amount Congress allocated to the Perkins Basic State Grant program in FY 2018.

Work-Based Learning Champions in New Hampshire

Officials have been working to promote and expand work-based learning, extended learning, and apprenticeship opportunities for students in both high school and college in New Hampshire. Educators are creating templates and rubrics that will be available to districts to develop and implement effective programs for students. 21 New Hampshire residents received Work-Based Learning Awards at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center. Teachers, educators, and counselors working together, with businesses, to get students access to learning opportunities outside of the classroom. And two elected officials who have been long-time supporters of students involved in career and technical education.

New Hampshire Work-Based Learning

Michigan Technological University and Bay de Noc Community College Collaborate to Prep Students for Industry

How can one educational program teach all the skill sets industry requires? Michigan Tech has designed a way.

Industry is not a monolith.  One employer needs to hire people with electrical skills. Another is looking for employees who understand fluid power systems.  A third needs someone who can read blueprints. How can one educational program meet all their needs?

Partnering with Bay de Noc Community College and funded by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Labor, state agencies and industry, Michigan Technological University has helped craft an educational program to meet industry’s needs. It’s an initiative in industrial automation, robotics and controls to help students earn credentials from certificates to associate degrees to bachelor’s degrees. The development of the tools and curriculum will prepare Michigan Tech students to join the workforce.  

Michigan Tech

$75,000 per Year with Benefits; No College Needed

Miami is a city with an ever changing skyline. And those who make it happen — the plumbers, electricians, brick masons and carpenters — earn far above the local median: $55,000-75,000 a year with full benefits and a pension.

But as the economy barrels toward full employment, local contractors are struggling to find enough skilled workers to fuel the construction boom.

“We’re seeing it across the board. There are shortages in every trade,” said Peter Dyga, president of the South Florida-based Florida East Coast Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors, a non-profit trade organization comprised of several construction firms and contractors.

Associated Builders and Contractors

Time to Reinforce the Building Blocks of The American Dream

Successful nations, just like successful businesses, are built on three things: people, education and ideas. 

By opening our nation’s doors to people ready to build new lives and abide by the Constitution, the U.S. has become a stronger, more vibrant nation. By investing heavily in public education, the nation transformed both natives and newcomers into literate, numerate Americans ready to contribute to an advanced industrial economy. And by investing in scientific research, the nation combined and advanced new ideas — many from these new Americans — in new ways to build the most productive, prosperous nation the world has even seen.

However, these three pillars of the American dream — people, education and the investment in scientific research that is the wellspring of new ideas, new capabilities and new products — are all endangered.


A New U: Faster + Cheaper Alternatives to College

Every year, the cost of a four-year degree goes up, and the value goes down. But for many students, there’s a better answer. 

So many things are getting faster and cheaper. Movies stream into your living room, without ticket or concession-stand costs. The world’s libraries are at your fingertips instantly, and for free. 

So why is a college education the only thing that seems immune to change? Colleges and universities operate much as they did 40 years ago, with one major exception: they’ve gotten dramatically more expensive. And they’ve actually gotten slower, with the average time to graduate now over five years. 

As a result, graduates often struggle with enormous debt burdens. Even worse, they often find that degrees did not prepare them to obtain and succeed at good jobs in growing sectors of the economy. Parents and students have accepted this because a college degree has been seen as a prerequisite to a professional career. But now, for the first time, there are real alternatives. 

A New You

ONE and DONE, Workforce Development at Houston Community College

Houston Community College is pioneering a program to ensure students earn a level one certificate, receive resume writing assistance and get help with job interviews in just one semester.  The “Take One & Done” program is being offered at HCC’s Southeast College Eastside Campus.

“Students come full time and we will provide financial aid, child care from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. if necessary, and they will get a level one certificate in one of seven programs,” says Melissa Gonzalez, president of Southeast College. “We looked specifically at these programs, where there are jobs and there is a demand for workers.”

“Take One and Done” includes level one certificates in:

  1. Welding Technology-Basic Welding Helper
  2. Construction Management Technology
  3. Industrial Electricity Electrical Helper
  4. Business Management-Insurance Specialist/Associate
  5. Logistics & Supply Chain Management - Maritime Logistics & Specialist
  6. Real Estate - Residential
  7. HVAC

Innovation Lab Program Emerged from International Baccalaureate Authorization

A collective effort by the academic leadership team of the Solomon Schechter Day School of
Bergen County, the development of our Innovation Lab program emerged from our pursuit of
the International Baccalaureate(IB) authorization. As part of that effort, we introduced a design
thinking course in our middle school and hired a part-time design thinking faculty member.
 
Andrew Katz, our Director of Academic Affairs joined the school in mid 2017, bringing with him
experience in design and building innovation labs at two previous independent schools. Once we
created our vision for the program, we were fortunate enough to receive a donation from an
alumni parent, which enabled us to turn our vision into a reality. We then quickly turned our
focus to hiring an experienced director of the lab, and together - along with our science team,
librarian, and educational technology team -  began concentrating on developing a robust
curriculum, designing the space, and focusing on interdisciplinary integration across the school.
 
Our team also visited and initiated relationships with community maker spaces, such as the
Maker Depot in Totowa, N.J., which have offered advice regarding 3D printing and
demonstrated potential tools that will further inspire our design courses.
Solomon Schechter NJ

Syndicate content