S.T.E.M.

STEM EDUCATION IS ABOUT HANDS ON EXPERIENCES

The processes of inquiry, reasoning and collaboration required in STEM learning are similar to any experiential activity; learning activities must be hands-on experiences. STEM classes also demand rigor and relevance in a curriculum, and the students who take these classes must learn to think critically as they use science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to solve real world problems through direct learning experiences.

Reading does not provide the kind of authentic experiences that students need. Students aren’t likely to be motivated by reading content alone, and as a result, their overall academic performance will likely suffer.


Engineering Practices for Effective STEM Learning

“What if schools could offer a different approach to STEM education that provided students with truly immersive learning opportunities?” That question came to Ethan Berman, founder of i2 Learning, after the experience of his nine-year old daughter, who liked school but loved solving problems and making things with her own hands, especially, as she put it, “if it was something useful.”

That was what inspired Berman to found Boston STEM Week, which just concluded its second successful year by replacing the usual curriculum for the more than 6,000 students and 300 teachers across 37 Boston middle schools. During this week, schools replace their usual curriculum with projects aimed at building lunar colonies, creating interactive monsters, designing digital games, and practicing surgical techniques.

 


$200 Million from DOE Backed Up By $300 Million from Corporations Supporting STEM Education

Many of the country’s largest tech companies, including Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Salesforce, pledged a total of $300 million for computer science education, part of a partnership meant to prepare students for careers in technology. The corporate donations follow a White House effort to direct federal money toward teacher training and resources that bolster science, technology, engineering and math. President Trump directed the Education Department to put $200 million in grant money toward computer science education.

Many of the companies involved in the computer science initiative have been pushing to increase computer training in schools. Tech companies see the STEM fields, and computer science in particular, as a weakness in American education and have pressed for coding and other classes to be bolstered to keep the United States competitive with nations that are pulling ahead in those areas.


50,361 Workforce Credentials Issued in Virginia in Fiscal Year 2017

Virginia has achieved the goal set in Executive Order 23 – Establishing the New Virginia Economy Workforce Initiative, which called for the annual production of 50,000 workforce credentials aligned with high-paying jobs in science, technology, engineering, math, and healthcare (STEM-H). The 50,361 STEM-H credentials awarded during fiscal year 2017 represent a 36-percent increase compared to fiscal year 2014 when the goal of 50,000 credentials per year was set. These credentials include: associate degrees, certificate programs, apprenticeships, certifications, licenses, and industry credentials.                   

 

“Because we set an ambitious goal of 50,000 STEM-H credentials each year, Virginia is transforming its workforce into one that is both highly skilled and work-ready for businesses across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Terry McAuliffe.  “These workforce credentials are critical to supporting Virginia’s growing high-tech economy by providing citizens the skills they need to get good-paying jobs. The success of this effort is a testament to the hard work of our educators, students, and business leaders who are strengthening our new Virginia economy every day.”


Why Pursue a Career in Electronic Systems

Eventually every device that plugs in or has batteries will be part of a huge ecosystem that shares information and control with the other devices.  And we are all part of it. Doesn’t it make sense to be looking at careers that are tied directly to this technology? New challenges come on an almost daily basis as new ideas, technologies, and applications are introduced constantly.  And very few things have as big an impact as providing capabilities they never knew were possible, in a way that is easy to control and enjoy. 

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

U.S. Armed Forces, STEM Education and the Skills Gap

The U.S. Armed Forces, including the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), have responded to the gap by leveraging their civilian scientists, engineers and laboratories. The branches host learning sessions and competitions and promote mentorships between students and employees with jobs pertaining to STEM throughout the country.

The AEOP has been supporting STEM education for more than 50 years, according to Louie Lopez, the chief of human capital and STEM outreach at U.S. Army Research, Development Engineering Command. He said the programs leverage the Army’s research laboratories and staff in the hope of instilling STEM literacy in students, and they also hope to introduce students to potential STEM tracks inside and outside of the Army.

FIU Teaches Manufacturing Disciplines to Engineering Students

Among the more than 30,000 students attending renowned Florida International University (FIU) in Miami are some 4,000 young men and women pursuing degrees in various disciplines of engineering.  A required course for the mechanical engineering majors is Manufacturing Processes, located in the University’s Engineering Manufacturing Center, a focal point for Civil, Mechanical, Biomedical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as Engineering Management majors.   It is here that they roll up their sleeves and get into the practical side of advanced manufacturing under the guidance of the Center’s coordinator and instructor Richard Zicarelli.

 

FIU Manufacturing

Next Generation Cybersecurity Training Platform Addresses Critical Skills Shortfall

Fully immersive, artificial intelligence (AI) powered, next generation cybersecurity training platform.

 

Project Ares™ provides cybersecurity professionals and students the means to practice skills and hone tactics through a real-time online training platform. Designed for commercial, government, and academic customers, Project Ares deploys realistic, skill-specific virtual environments with real-world tools, network activity, and a library of mission scenarios. Game-based learning provides immediate feedback in an engaging, safe atmosphere where trainees can solve relevant problems without consequence.


"Going Pro" in Michigan. State Agency's Join Resources to Promote CTE and Fill the Skills Gap

“Going PRO” is a Michigan campaign designed to elevate the perception of professional trades and to showcase opportunities in a variety of rewarding careers.

A sizable professional trades shortage exists in Michigan and is expected to continue through 2024. Professional trades will account for more than 500,000 jobs in the Michigan economy, and approximately 15,000 new job openings are expected annually in the state during that time.

Wages for professional trades occupations is 45 percent higher than other occupations – $51,000 is the median annual salary for these jobs!

Opportunities exist in a variety of emerging industries including IT, healthcare, advanced manufacturing, construction and automotive. And many of the career fields do not require a four-year degree.

Go Pro Michigan

Work in the Automation Age: Sustainable Careers Today and Into the Future

80% of manufacturers report a shortage of qualified applicants for skilled production positions, and the shortage could cost U.S. manufacturers 11% of their annual earnings. Manufacturing executives reported an average of 94 days to recruit engineering and research employees and 70 days to recruit skilled production workers. The skills gap is driving up what are already above average wages and benefits in U.S. manufacturing. Studies show an increasing skills gap with as many as two million jobs going unfilled in the manufacturing industry alone in the next decade.

The Association for Advancing Automation (http://www.a3automate.org) (A3) explores the impact of automation on the ever-evolving job market and the growing shortage of skilled employees with experience and training in advanced technologies. A3 examines the types of jobs that are going unfilled and reviews workforce development initiatives, including education, apprenticeships, and on-the-job training that will fill labor shortages and support ongoing economic growth and productivity. http://www.a3automate.org/work-in-the-automation-age-white-paper/

Working in the Automation Age

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