Vocational

IBM Expands New Collar Career Partnerships with U.S. Community Colleges

America’s largest technology employer is expanding partnerships with numerous community colleges in the United States to better prepare more Americans for “New Collar” career opportunities. In these well-paying roles, in-demand technology skills are valued more than credentials, and a traditional four-year college degree may not always be required. In addition to collaborating on curricula design for next generation IT skills, IBM will work with community colleges near its major U.S. facilities to offer more local students the opportunity to participate in internships and apprenticeships within the company, as well as direct hiring for IBM careers. This initiative will grow over the next six months to include more than a dozen schools in or near communities such as Columbia, MO; Rocket Center, WV; Dubuque, IA; Boulder, CO; Poughkeepsie, NY; Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX and Houston, TX. With this initiative, IBM is working to expand technology career opportunities in areas that traditionally have been underserved by high-tech employers.

 


How Schools are Leveraging Micro-Credentials and Badges

School systems nationwide are increasingly using meaningful credentials and badges to recognize students and educators alike. CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking) issued a report titled Micro-Credentials and Badges: Competency-Based Recognition for Learning, which examines this innovative trend-and how schools are leveraging these distinctions to expand student skills and encourage professional development in modern learning settings.

"Micro-credentials and badges are powerful ways to recognize the achievements of students, teachers and administrators," said Keith Krueger, CEO of CoSN. "More and more districts are incorporating these efforts into their curriculum to advance learning outcomes and professional development."

Michigan Tackles the Challenges of Skills and Educator Gap

At the direction of Gov. Rick Snyder and the goals and strategies set forth by the Building Michigan’s 21st Century Economic report and the 21st Century Michigan Education Commission, we’re taking a holistic approach to elevating all pathways to good-paying careers in Michigan, especially those in the professional trades. We need to close our state’s talent gap, caused, in part, by a career awareness gap. Too many students are unaware of, and don’t always have access to, all the pathways leading to rewarding and good-paying careers.


Illinois Tweaks Licensing Requirements for Technical Education Teachers

The Illinois State Board of Education's Division Administrator for Educator Effectiveness, Emily Fox, said the hope is to make it easier for schools to get people with the skills to teach career and technical education into the classroom. "The licensure requirements to get a CTE license did not change. But we did remove the barrier that said that individuals who substitute teach need to hold a bachelors degree," Fox said. "Individuals who are qualified to teach in a career and technical education classroom can sub without having to get a separate substitute license."


Why Pursue a Career in Electronic Systems

Eventually every device that plugs in or has batteries will be part of a huge ecosystem that shares information and control with the other devices.  And we are all part of it. Doesn’t it make sense to be looking at careers that are tied directly to this technology? New challenges come on an almost daily basis as new ideas, technologies, and applications are introduced constantly.  And very few things have as big an impact as providing capabilities they never knew were possible, in a way that is easy to control and enjoy. 

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

BUILDS ACT - Building U.S. Infrastructure by Leveraging Demands for Skills

Act to ensure that workers are prepared with the skills needed for jobs—in fields such as construction, transportation and energy—that would be created by a major investment in infrastructure. Legislators on both sides of the aisle, have expressed support for a significant infrastructure plan to fix the country’s crumbling roads and bridges.

 

A recent study by the Center of Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University estimated that a $1 trillion infrastructure investment would create 11 million new jobs. Of these jobs, nearly half would require skilled job training beyond a high school level. The BUILDS Act promotes partnerships made up of local businesses and industry organizations, workforce boards, labor representatives and education and training providers to support workforce training programs in infrastructure-related jobs.


Colleges Filling Skills Gap by Including Hands-On Training as Part of Curriculum

Change in Education must start at the University level. The following Institutions of Higher Education are leading the way. The NY Times is covering the story. “The economy and employers have changed,” said Louis Soares, vice president of the American Council on Education. “They want you to come in with a hot skill set, ready to go. Colleges are paying attention at different levels to what that means and trying to develop programs.” 

Some are doing that better than others. “Some institutions are very good,” said Gary Burtless, an economist with the Brookings Institution. “They have their ear to the ground, they’re listening to local employers and paying attention to what they need.”

 

Case Western Reserve University

 

Creating 15- or 18-credit minors may be one of the more effective strategies for preparing students to enter high-demand fields. Because a minor requires fewer credits than a major and few, if any, prerequisites, these allow colleges to be more flexible and responsive to changing industries and emerging technologies.


U.S. Armed Forces, STEM Education and the Skills Gap

The U.S. Armed Forces, including the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), have responded to the gap by leveraging their civilian scientists, engineers and laboratories. The branches host learning sessions and competitions and promote mentorships between students and employees with jobs pertaining to STEM throughout the country.

The AEOP has been supporting STEM education for more than 50 years, according to Louie Lopez, the chief of human capital and STEM outreach at U.S. Army Research, Development Engineering Command. He said the programs leverage the Army’s research laboratories and staff in the hope of instilling STEM literacy in students, and they also hope to introduce students to potential STEM tracks inside and outside of the Army.

FIU Teaches Manufacturing Disciplines to Engineering Students

Among the more than 30,000 students attending renowned Florida International University (FIU) in Miami are some 4,000 young men and women pursuing degrees in various disciplines of engineering.  A required course for the mechanical engineering majors is Manufacturing Processes, located in the University’s Engineering Manufacturing Center, a focal point for Civil, Mechanical, Biomedical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as Engineering Management majors.   It is here that they roll up their sleeves and get into the practical side of advanced manufacturing under the guidance of the Center’s coordinator and instructor Richard Zicarelli.

 

FIU Manufacturing

Next Generation Cybersecurity Training Platform Addresses Critical Skills Shortfall

Fully immersive, artificial intelligence (AI) powered, next generation cybersecurity training platform.

 

Project Ares™ provides cybersecurity professionals and students the means to practice skills and hone tactics through a real-time online training platform. Designed for commercial, government, and academic customers, Project Ares deploys realistic, skill-specific virtual environments with real-world tools, network activity, and a library of mission scenarios. Game-based learning provides immediate feedback in an engaging, safe atmosphere where trainees can solve relevant problems without consequence.


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