Alternative Energy

Boeing Engineers Create STEM Activities to Challenge and Inspire Students

Boeing, Iridescent's Curiosity Machine, PBS Learning Media and the Teaching Channel have produced a collection of educational materials and tutorials that children can use to engineer an airfoil, find alternative energy sources and design their own satellite, among dozens of other activities.

The activities are intended to develop skills such as the ability to think critically, collaborate and communicate effectively. Boeing engineers worked side-by-side with its partners to develop lesson plans, documentaries and hands-on activities that break down complicated concepts into easy-to-digest resources. All materials and tutorials are available to download for free at Boeing's Educational Resources page. http://www.boeing.com/principles/education.page#/edu_resources

Early Love Of Math Led Her To The Role Of CEO

NPR interview: Lisa Dyson, CEO of Kiverdi, a sustainable oil and chemical company, discusses an early role model, her work and the need to boost technology education.

Share your personal story. How did you get into STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)?
My cousin is a space engineer. She was my role model. I always loved math. She loved math too and applied it to building satellites as an electrical engineer, initially at Hughes Aircraft Co. So, early in my life, I decided I wanted to follow in her footsteps. I ended up becoming a physicist.
Dr. Lisa Dyson

Energy Industry 3 Million Jobs by 2020

The number of jobs in the Energy Sector will double in the next five years, according to a recent report by Manpower, the worldwide staffing company. More than half of energy employers say they are having great difficulties finding “the talent it needs.” 74 percent say the problem will get worse by 2020. The report summarizes, 'This skills gap could adversely affect our nation’s competitiveness and hurt the record-setting growth seen in the energy and manufacturing sectors unless immediate steps are taken to better educate young Americans in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).


Green/Sustainability, Knowledge and Skill Project

Environmental awareness is an important asset needed to engage in a broad range of industries. Green/sustainability knowledge and skills, therefore, are a vital component of preparing students to thrive in the marketplace of the 21st century. CTE courses and programs have a major responsibility for helping students gain such knowledge and skills. To assist in this effort, MPR Associates, Inc., with funding from the U.S. Department of Education and in collaboration with the National Career Technical Education Foundation (NCTEF) and Vivayic, Inc., led the Green/Sustainability Knowledge and Skills project. It provides supplemental standards that complement the Career Clusters Knowledge and Skills Statements for the 16 Career Clusters.


SPIRIT of INNOVATION Challenge

Thanks to the Spirit of Innovation Challenge (Conrad Challenge), the world will not have to wait for solutions to affordable water filtration in Haiti, self-regulating temperature fabrics for harsh environments, eco-friendly pop-up toilets for emergency distressed areas, and many other game-changing innovations. It also means that young innovator/ entrepreneurs don’t have to graduate from high school before their commercially-viable, technology-based ideas can be realized and applied to real-world issues! The 2012-2013 Spirit of Innovation Challenge invites student teams from around the world, ages 13-18, to innovate new products by combining creative thinking with science and technology skills to solve real-world challenges.

 


The Solar Water Still Challenge

The world land area affected by questionable drinking water sources is staggering in size. According to the World Health Organization, about 1.2 billion people do not have safe clean water sources. This should not be allowed to continue. A possible solution is to use a solar water still to distill water on site. The problem is the current cost of $200 to $250 US dollars, when many of these families only earn a few dollars per day.

Solar Still

Dow Solar Competitions

Dow Corning says it will sponsor the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 from Sept. 23 to Oct. 2 in Washington, D.C., to spur growth of the solar industry and support education. In the Solar Decathlon, 20 collegiate teams design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive.The company said it will oversee the creation of educational resources that will help strengthen middle school students' understanding of solar energy and sustainability and the importance of science, technology, engineering and math.


Green Jobs Training Grant

A new $1.3 million dollar grant awarded to the Sustainability, Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative at the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) by The Kresge Foundation will expand green job training opportunities and innovations at community colleges. SEED, with its focus on sustainability, education and economic development, helps community colleges initiate and expand green job training programs.


US Department of Labor announces $38 million in grants awarded through Green Jobs Innovation Fund

The U.S. Department of Labor has awarded six organizations a total of $38 million in Green Jobs Innovation Fund grants to serve workers in 19 states and the District of Columbia."This grant program is an important part of the administration's efforts to equip workers with the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to succeed in green industry jobs," said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis.


Department of Education Starts Award for "Green" Schools

The U.S. Department of Education announced today the creation of the Green Ribbon Schools program to recognize schools that are creating healthy and sustainable learning environments and teaching environmental literacy. The new awards program will be run by the Education Department with the support of the White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.


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