Manufacturing Day 2017 at Over 2617 locations around the U.S.

Manufacturing Day is a growing grassroots movement of manufacturers dedicated to overcoming the shared challenges facing manufacturers today. The most pressing issue is a gap in skilled labor. 80 percent of manufacturers cannot find the skilled workers they need. This gap continues to widen. Manufacturers’ ability to address this issue has been hindered by the public perception that careers in manufacturing are undesirable and by the lack of sufficient preparatory education. Both of these problems stem from a lack of understanding of present-day manufacturing environments, which are highly technical. Manufacturing environments, which include highly trained, well-paid employees who work on state-of-the-art equipment, are commonly thought of as antiquated factories designed for low-skilled workers. Manufacturing Day addresses this misperception by giving all manufacturers an opportunity to open their doors and show, in a coordinated effort, exactly what manufacturing is.


Skills USA Members Joined by the Secretary of Education in Support of Career and Technical Education

Students representing career and technical education (CTE) programs in 29 states met with congressional representatives Sept. 26 after hearing the Secretary of Education call SkillsUSA “an integral part of their educational experience.” The students were attending the annual Washington Leadership Training Institute (WLTI) to learn to be better advocates for public career education. During the Sept. 23-27 event, they visited their congressional representatives and paid respects at Arlington National Cemetery’s Tomb of the Unknowns as well as the Pentagon 9/11 Memorial. The annual WLTI, with 506 attendees, was the largest in SkillsUSA’s 52-year history.

Skills USA

50,361 Workforce Credentials Issued in Virginia in Fiscal Year 2017

Virginia has achieved the goal set in Executive Order 23 – Establishing the New Virginia Economy Workforce Initiative, which called for the annual production of 50,000 workforce credentials aligned with high-paying jobs in science, technology, engineering, math, and healthcare (STEM-H). The 50,361 STEM-H credentials awarded during fiscal year 2017 represent a 36-percent increase compared to fiscal year 2014 when the goal of 50,000 credentials per year was set. These credentials include: associate degrees, certificate programs, apprenticeships, certifications, licenses, and industry credentials.                   

 

“Because we set an ambitious goal of 50,000 STEM-H credentials each year, Virginia is transforming its workforce into one that is both highly skilled and work-ready for businesses across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Terry McAuliffe.  “These workforce credentials are critical to supporting Virginia’s growing high-tech economy by providing citizens the skills they need to get good-paying jobs. The success of this effort is a testament to the hard work of our educators, students, and business leaders who are strengthening our new Virginia economy every day.”


Robot Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

unveils a framework for universities to train the next generation of creators, rather than laborers, by enhancing skills that are innately, and uniquely, human. The impetus for the book was a realization that robotics and artificial intelligence are advancing more rapidly than anyone predicted. Even scientists appear to be caught off-guard by the sudden and unprecedented capabilities of their creations. These technological advances have vast implications, especially for the future of work.

Northeastern University President and author Joseph E. Aoun said, “Machines are smart and getting smarter,” More jobs are going to disappear and new jobs will be created. We need to meet these challenges.”

http://robot-proof.com/

His plan? Cultivate the best of what it means to be human. Aoun has proposed a new comprehensive curriculum based on a field he calls humanics—the human equivalent of robotics—which is defined by the mastery of three literacies: technological literacy, data literacy, and human literacy—the third referring to qualities computers can’t replicate, no matter how smart they become.

Northeastern University President and author Joseph E. Aoun

Massachusetts CTE Approach Works - Widely Popular With Students

In Massachusetts 48,000 students are enrolled in vocational schools and vocational programs in traditional high schools, with an estimated 3,200 more on waiting lists due to a shortage of available space for those who qualify for acceptance. At Blue Hills Regional Technical School in Canton, which has approximately 850 students in grades 9 through 12, there were 511 applications for just 240 places in the Class of 2021.

What is driving the popularity of vocational education – career and technical education (CTE) – in Massachusetts? How does today’s vocational education differ from that of yesteryear? What is happening in the Bay State on the CTE frontline that is making it so successful and sought after?


IBM Expands New Collar Career Partnerships with U.S. Community Colleges

America’s largest technology employer is expanding partnerships with numerous community colleges in the United States to better prepare more Americans for “New Collar” career opportunities. In these well-paying roles, in-demand technology skills are valued more than credentials, and a traditional four-year college degree may not always be required. In addition to collaborating on curricula design for next generation IT skills, IBM will work with community colleges near its major U.S. facilities to offer more local students the opportunity to participate in internships and apprenticeships within the company, as well as direct hiring for IBM careers. This initiative will grow over the next six months to include more than a dozen schools in or near communities such as Columbia, MO; Rocket Center, WV; Dubuque, IA; Boulder, CO; Poughkeepsie, NY; Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX and Houston, TX. With this initiative, IBM is working to expand technology career opportunities in areas that traditionally have been underserved by high-tech employers.

 


How Schools are Leveraging Micro-Credentials and Badges

School systems nationwide are increasingly using meaningful credentials and badges to recognize students and educators alike. CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking) issued a report titled Micro-Credentials and Badges: Competency-Based Recognition for Learning, which examines this innovative trend-and how schools are leveraging these distinctions to expand student skills and encourage professional development in modern learning settings.

"Micro-credentials and badges are powerful ways to recognize the achievements of students, teachers and administrators," said Keith Krueger, CEO of CoSN. "More and more districts are incorporating these efforts into their curriculum to advance learning outcomes and professional development."

Michigan Tackles the Challenges of Skills and Educator Gap

At the direction of Gov. Rick Snyder and the goals and strategies set forth by the Building Michigan’s 21st Century Economic report and the 21st Century Michigan Education Commission, we’re taking a holistic approach to elevating all pathways to good-paying careers in Michigan, especially those in the professional trades. We need to close our state’s talent gap, caused, in part, by a career awareness gap. Too many students are unaware of, and don’t always have access to, all the pathways leading to rewarding and good-paying careers.


Illinois Tweaks Licensing Requirements for Technical Education Teachers

The Illinois State Board of Education's Division Administrator for Educator Effectiveness, Emily Fox, said the hope is to make it easier for schools to get people with the skills to teach career and technical education into the classroom. "The licensure requirements to get a CTE license did not change. But we did remove the barrier that said that individuals who substitute teach need to hold a bachelors degree," Fox said. "Individuals who are qualified to teach in a career and technical education classroom can sub without having to get a separate substitute license."


Why Pursue a Career in Electronic Systems

Eventually every device that plugs in or has batteries will be part of a huge ecosystem that shares information and control with the other devices.  And we are all part of it. Doesn’t it make sense to be looking at careers that are tied directly to this technology? New challenges come on an almost daily basis as new ideas, technologies, and applications are introduced constantly.  And very few things have as big an impact as providing capabilities they never knew were possible, in a way that is easy to control and enjoy. 

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

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