CTE Month - 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Hughes Act

The year 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Hughes Act, the first act of Congress to provide funding for career and technical education. Career and Technical organizations across the nation, plan to celebrate the landmark occasion throughout February, during National Career and Technical Education Month, “Celebrate Today, Own Tomorrow.” The most important role of our education system is to build brighter futures for our students. Career and technical education programs play a crucial role in that preparation. The Smith-Hughes Act was the first step 100 years ago and funding mechanisms like the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act help support the effort.


Boeing Engineers Create STEM Activities to Challenge and Inspire Students

Boeing, Iridescent's Curiosity Machine, PBS Learning Media and the Teaching Channel have produced a collection of educational materials and tutorials that children can use to engineer an airfoil, find alternative energy sources and design their own satellite, among dozens of other activities.

The activities are intended to develop skills such as the ability to think critically, collaborate and communicate effectively. Boeing engineers worked side-by-side with its partners to develop lesson plans, documentaries and hands-on activities that break down complicated concepts into easy-to-digest resources. All materials and tutorials are available to download for free at Boeing's Educational Resources page. http://www.boeing.com/principles/education.page#/edu_resources

Preparing Our Workforce Nation With New Skills for Automation

“How do we reposition our workforce to remain competitive? The answer lies in retraining the workforce nation to excel in automation and technology in the 21st century marketplace. Think about that for a moment… what has happened to work in the past few decades. Many in the workforce were raised with the ‘jobs for life’ philosophy of the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s. These positions required no postsecondary education, no specialized training, or certification, just a high school diploma. Those days are gone forever.

Then reality hit in the 80’s and 90’s, with automation and technology. In the manufacturing sector, many jobs that were traditionally performed by people are now automated, with machines replacing factory workers. This evolution is not just limited to the manufacturing industry. All industries have been affected by “automation” and “technology”. As I sit writing this article in Panera Bread on Long Island, NY I can order my food at a kiosk. McDonald just unveiled their touch screen self-service kiosk at various locations throughout the U.S. These kiosks will replace some cash register positions. Recently, Amazon announced plans to use automation to displace cashiers. They plan to open a futuristic grocery store eliminating the human element.
Dr. Corinthia Price

IBM CEO Wants to Help Trump Create New Jobs in America

Rometty urged Trump in a letter to focus his job-creation efforts on vocational training for young workers.

"Let's work together to scale up this approach of vocational training, creating a national corps of skilled workers trained to take the 'new collar' IT jobs that are in demand here in America," Rometty wrote in the letter that was first reported by CNBC.

 

Trump too has advocated for more job training, something he and President Obama seem to agree on.

Obama has spent a record $265 million on apprenticeship programs in the last two fiscal years, according to the Commerce Department.

 


The U.S Should Ensure Students Can Train for STEM Careers

In order for the US to remain at the forefront of innovation and not lag behind, we must address the disconnect between the skills required for 21st century jobs and young people’s ability to acquire those skills. Fixing this will require us to evolve our approach to public education and training. The latest results of the PISA exam, which assesses science, math, and reading performance among 15-year-olds around the globe, show American students noticeably behind in math scores (below the international average), with science and reading scores remaining flat. This is not a small problem.

In one way, Congress took a bold, bipartisan step toward reversing this downward trend and closing America’s skills gap last fall, when the House of Representatives voted 405-to-5 to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, which had languished since 2006. The Perkins Act provides more than $1 billion in funding for career and technical education across the US. The bill aligns career and tech education programs with actual labor market demands. Updating this important legislation can and should be an early win for the 115th Congress and the incoming administration.

Virtual and Augmented Reality Learning Experience - DOE Launches $680,000 Challenge

Simulated environments, such as virtual and augmented reality, 3D simulations, and multiplayer video games, are emerging approaches to deliver educational content. Research indicates that simulation-based learning provides students with enriched experiences in information retention, engagement, skills acquisition, and learning outcomes.The EdSim Challenge seeks next-generation educational simulations that strengthen academic, technical, and employability skills. The Department is most interested in immersive and engaging simulations that include clearly defined learning goals and build diverse skill sets.The purpose of this Challenge is to stimulate the marketplace for computer-generated virtual and augmented reality educational experiences that combine existing and future technologies with skill-building content and embedded assessment. The developer community is encouraged to make aspects of simulations available through open source licenses and low-cost shareable components.


Coding to Every Classroom

The push to teach coding in U.S. schools has been growing: Thanks to initiatives like the White House’s CS for All program, computer science is now recognized as a core skill for today’s students. A new study by Gallup and Google revealed that 90 percent of parents want their child to learn CS, yet only 40 percent of K-12 school districts offer some kind of CS course. Teacher recruitment and training efforts are beginning to solve the problem at the high-school level, but in K-8 schools (where very few schools offer CS and many teachers are generalists) the challenges are different. Many teachers without much coding experience understandably feel anxious about integrating this new literacy into their classrooms.

Coding to Every Classroom

Students are a (Plasma) Cut Above with CAD/CAM

The students in Dale Sunderman’s shop classes at Oregon’s Stayton High School are so busy cutting, pressing, milling and welding unique projects they wish there were more hours in a school day. The courses begin with Manufacturing 1 and include the basics in shop safety, sheet metal work, drill press, lathe and mill operations and automated manufacturing. Here, the students get their feet wet in CAD (Computer Aided Design) and CAM (Computer Aided Machining) operations. After a basic fabrication class, students enter Advanced Manufacturing, where they hone their skills in MIG and TIG welding, as well as industry-oriented CNC programming and machining. “It is at this level and in the Independent Studies Manufacturing course,” says Sunderman, “that the more eager students really begin to stand out. Their projects even capture the interest of the surrounding community.”
 
Stayton HS, MasterCAM

Makerspaces: Simple and Cost Effective Projects to Build Your Own STEM Program

Every new classroom project must satisfy available resources within three dimensions: 1) time, 2) money and 3) physical space. The 2016 New Media Consortium Horizon Report for K-12 Education anticipates that makerspaces will be highly adopted in schools across the country within the next year. Maker education and makerspaces are the hot topic in STEM education right now.

Over the last year I have worked with many teachers in a professional development environment who are simultaneously enthusiastic about the idea of a makerspace, and frustrated by the limitations of space in their schedule, budget and classroom layout. We all want a makerspace, but how do we make that happen within these constraints?
Ready for the Good News?
You do not need wait for additional funding or a district-wide initiative to build your own classroom makerspace. Teachers can embrace makerspaces with any level of experience and with any available resources.

Top Earning Major's Dominated by STEM Degrees

Glassdoor study released. The job search engine analyzed more than 500,000 resumes and self-reported salaries to determine which majors pay the most during the first five years after graduation. Eight of the 10 most-bankable majors are tied to engineering or technology, such as computer science, electrical engineering and information technology. Nearly half of the majors listed are in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, though business-related majors, such as accounting and marketing, crack the top half of the 50 majors listed.

https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/50-highest-paying-college-majors/


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