Mastercam University Prepares Machine Shop Teacher to Stay Ahead of Computer-Savvy Students

When Gene Hickey began teaching the art of machining in 1977, computer-aided manufacturing wasn’t a part of the curriculum. The Atari 2600 video gaming system was introduced that same year and, at $265 was a luxury for most households.  When Hickey decided to return to the classroom in 2006 – after a 15-year hiatus – he entered an environment where his students were computer-literate, having grown up using gaming systems that had gone mainstream with graphics that rivaled those in animated films.

Mastercam University

Preparing Students for a Project-Based World

About one-third of American workers are now engaged in some kind of freelance, or project-based, work. Students are graduating into a working world that encourages short term projects or “gigs” over full time employment. And, for those who do work in full time jobs, they often organize their work into projects, work collaboratively in teams and solve unique and pressing problems. In this year long campaign titled “It’s a Project-Based World,” Getting Smart is exploring the economic realities of a project-based world as part of the equity movement to ensure all students are prepared for college, career and citizenship.


Students are Skipping Science and Math Because They Don't Understand Vast Career Opportunities

It’s the missed opportunity of a generation: demand for scientists and engineers has never been stronger, but many young people in the U.S. are avoiding science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education because they don’t understand the opportunities, according to a recent survey by Emerson. - See more at: http://www.emerson.com/en-us/careers/Pages/STEM-survey-results.aspx?cm

The survey* revealed that 42 percent of respondents would have considered a career in STEM fields had they better understood a potential career path, and one-third of respondents didn’t pursue a STEM career because it seemed too hard.


Tech Firms Call on Lawmakers to Invest in STEM Education

Tech companies called for the federal government to invest in more STEM Education. An issue the industry hopes to influence in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election. Representatives of Microsoft, Facebook and Amazon said they face difficulties finding qualified staff, a handicap they believe other US companies face and that threatens the strength of American industry. The issue is so widespread that it affects fields outside of technology, including pharmaceuticals and health care, they said.

"This is no longer a Microsoft, Facebook or Amazon issue," Brad Smith, Microsoft's chief legal officer said at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation's panel in Philadelphia. "Companies are only as good as the people we hire."

"Power of STEM Education" Grants Provided by TI and Texas Instruments Foundation

TI and the Texas Instruments Foundation have committed "Power of STEM Education" (POSE) grants to a variety of nonprofit partners and educators in targeted communities across the U.S. where the company has a major design or manufacturing presence, including California, Maine and Texas. Giving is focused on collaborative strategies to improve student success and teaching effectiveness in STEM education.  Special emphasis is given to programs that reach female and minority students who are underrepresented in science and engineering careers today.

"Our focus is on collaborative strategies to improve teaching effectiveness and student success in STEM education," said Andy Smith, executive director of the TI Foundation and TI director of corporate philanthropy.  "We seek out effective partners who share our goals, make strategic investments and develop long-term relationships with educators and their organizations to support proven, successful programs that can be scaled and replicated. Working together, we believe all students can move forward and experience greater success in STEM."

Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles Provide Real World Applications to Teach STEM

The Drone Smartz™ document is a 15-Module project to learn about UAV / Drone flying, the legal issues cited by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) & the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and common sense safety issues.  Safety should be introduced as the reoccurring theme that guides all operations for this course.  

Drone Smartz™ was written with two 7 Module segments.  The first seven Modules will involve (head knowledge) learning about drones, various legal issues, government regulations and safety.  The second seven Modules will focus on hands-on experience and allow us to differentiate between a “STEM” program focusing on secondary school students or adult occupational technology implementation. There will be midterm and final exams in this program and opportunities for between session (homework) Lab opportunities.
John Finkler

STEM Education Crucial for Global Youth - Education 2030 Research Project

At the Microsoft Philanthropies Enabling Opportunities summit, policy-makers, educators, researchers and non-profit organizations gathered in Singapore to discuss the challenges, opportunities and ideas required around building an ecosystem to bring the benefits of technology to their local communities. Christopher Clague, Senior Analyst at the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), shared key findings from EIU’s Education 2030 research project.

In terms of education, the developed and developing world are facing different types of demographic problems. Developed countries such as USA, UK, Japan and Germany face the problem of aging and graying societies. The older demographic draws more resources, leading to rising healthcare and pension costs and putting a strain on government budgets. As a result, public spending on education as a percentage of GDP is projected to fall across much of the developed world.

Education 2030

The STEM Education Challenge

New, robust partnerships between the public and private sectors are needed today to attract and educate the young scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians for tomorrow.A stem is the main trunk of a plant, and STEM — short for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics — is the main trunk of our economy. A plant that gets too little water will fail to grow. Unfortunately, that’s also what’s happening to STEM education in our country today. We’re simply failing to attract and educate a sufficient number of young scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians. Demand for these workers is growing fast, but our pool of talent isn’t.

The situation is especially perplexing, given that a career in STEM would seem to be highly attractive. Consider:

· Demand for STEM jobs is growing fast. Jobs across all occupations are forecast to increase by only 14 percent between 2010 and 2020. By contrast, jobs in biomedical engineering are expected to increase during that same period by 62 percent. In medical science, jobs are expected to grow during that period by 36 percent. And in systems software development, to grow by 32 percent.


SME Launches High School Membership Program to Build the Manufacturing Workforce Pipeline

"With an anticipated skills gap of 2 million jobs by 2025, the manufacturing industry needs to attract and inspire the next-generation workforce." SME, an organization that trains and develops the manufacturing workforce, has launched a high school membership program to educate the next generation on the value of manufacturing and encourage careers in the field. Manufacturing offers career opportunities for every education level ranging from skilled trades that require a high school diploma or GED to engineers, designers and programmers with bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as researchers and scientists with doctorates. There are currently more than 600,000 jobs available in manufacturing, with the expectation that number could grow to 2 million by 2025 because of an aging workforce and new technologies creating more jobs.

“Manufacturing needs to attract the next generation of talent,” said Christopher Wojcik, vice president of SME Membership. “SME is dedicated to educating students on the career opportunities in manufacturing; our high school student membership is a program to help the future workforce better understand the industry and ultimately fill the workforce pipeline.”


It's Time to Invest in STEM Education and Build a Nation of Makers

"Congress needs to pass the budget to support the next generation of innovators," says John King Jr., in an article published by U.S. News and World Report. From June 17 through 23, our nation celebrates the National Week of Making. This week recognizes that makers, builders and doers – of all ages and backgrounds – always have had a vital role in pushing our country to develop creative solutions to some of our most pressing challenges.

As President Barack Obama has noted, during this week, "We celebrate the tinkerers and dreamers whose talent and drive have brought new ideas to life, and we recommit to cultivating the next generation of problem solvers."


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