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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


How 3D Printing in Education Improves Learning

With the advent of affordable 3d printers like the DaVinci 1.0 (costs less than $500 in the USA), we wanted to see how this technology can best benefit education. Studica is always looking for ways to help education customers marry new technologies with their teaching goals, to help create a stronger learning experience for students.


Technology in Action

Manufacturing in the Future

Manufacturing is one of the most important factors to the economy of a country because it affects the wealth of a country and the standard of living its people enjoy. You only have to look at any number of countries and if they have a strong manufacturing base, they in turn also have a high standard of living. If it were possible to gaze into a crystal ball and look into the future of manufacturing, many amazing things are happening now and will happen in the near future. The use of the Internet will continue to play a major role in how manufacturing is conducted throughout the world. Some of the Web-based technologies such as machine tool control, machine diagnostics online, e-Procurement, e-Manufacturing, Virtual Reality and Simulation, etc., are available now. Investments being made now in new technology will pay huge dividends in product quality, increased productivity, decreased time to market, reduced manufacturing costs in the future.  
Author: 
Steve Krar

A Brighter Tomorrow

How often we wish for another chance

To make a fresh beginning,

A chance to blot our mistakes

And change failure into winning--

And it does not take a new year

To make a brand-new start,

It only takes the deep desire

To try with all our heart

To live a little better

And to always be forgiving

And to add a little laughter

To the world in which we're living--

So never give up in despair

And think that you are through,

For there's always a tomorrow

And a chance to start anew.

Anonymous


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

National Education Foundation Offers Matching STEM Grants

National Education Foundation (NEF), the national non-profit leader in STEM education as well as assisting schools to find Federal funds, will offer the mandated matching grant to enable any disadvantaged school district anywhere in the nation to receive  $1million to $50 million Federal funds for energy efficiency, renovation, technology, curriculum and teacher training. Any school district with at least 35% of students on free or reduced cost lunch is eligible to apply. Applications are available at www.qzab.org. Grants are awarded on a first-come first-served basis in most states.The little-known Federal Funding program has $700 million available.  NEF has set aside $70 million to provide the required 10% matching grant. NEF would also set up the mandated STEM+ (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, English, Social Studies, SAT/ACT, IT, Business) academy at no cost to the school district. 

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Illinois Tweaks Licensing Requirements for Technical Education Teachers

The Illinois State Board of Education's Division Administrator for Educator Effectiveness, Emily Fox, said the hope is to make it easier for schools to get people with the skills to teach career and technical education into the classroom. "The licensure requirements to get a CTE license did not change. But we did remove the barrier that said that individuals who substitute teach need to hold a bachelors degree," Fox said. "Individuals who are qualified to teach in a career and technical education classroom can sub without having to get a separate substitute license."


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

Accelerate STEM Innovation with FREE Ed Tech Tools

It is generally accepted that one can not design education today to prepare young people and adults for the future because we do not know what the future will be. Today, technology has zoomed past schools, industry, government, consumers and civil society. The modern world needs a new way, or more accurately, an old way of seeing technology. 

The question is not whether we can design for the future; rather, the question is: Can we update antiquated practice more closely aligned to what is emerging today in our own backyards?

 

News

Why Pursue a Career in Electronic Systems

Eventually every device that plugs in or has batteries will be part of a huge ecosystem that shares information and control with the other devices.  And we are all part of it. Doesn’t it make sense to be looking at careers that are tied directly to this technology? New challenges come on an almost daily basis as new ideas, technologies, and applications are introduced constantly.  And very few things have as big an impact as providing capabilities they never knew were possible, in a way that is easy to control and enjoy. 

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

BUILDS ACT - Building U.S. Infrastructure by Leveraging Demands for Skills

Act to ensure that workers are prepared with the skills needed for jobs—in fields such as construction, transportation and energy—that would be created by a major investment in infrastructure. Legislators on both sides of the aisle, have expressed support for a significant infrastructure plan to fix the country’s crumbling roads and bridges.

 

A recent study by the Center of Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University estimated that a $1 trillion infrastructure investment would create 11 million new jobs. Of these jobs, nearly half would require skilled job training beyond a high school level. The BUILDS Act promotes partnerships made up of local businesses and industry organizations, workforce boards, labor representatives and education and training providers to support workforce training programs in infrastructure-related jobs.


Colleges Filling Skills Gap by Including Hands-On Training as Part of Curriculum

Change in Education must start at the University level. The following Institutions of Higher Education are leading the way. The NY Times is covering the story. “The economy and employers have changed,” said Louis Soares, vice president of the American Council on Education. “They want you to come in with a hot skill set, ready to go. Colleges are paying attention at different levels to what that means and trying to develop programs.” 

Some are doing that better than others. “Some institutions are very good,” said Gary Burtless, an economist with the Brookings Institution. “They have their ear to the ground, they’re listening to local employers and paying attention to what they need.”

 

Case Western Reserve University

 

Creating 15- or 18-credit minors may be one of the more effective strategies for preparing students to enter high-demand fields. Because a minor requires fewer credits than a major and few, if any, prerequisites, these allow colleges to be more flexible and responsive to changing industries and emerging technologies.


U.S. Armed Forces, STEM Education and the Skills Gap

The U.S. Armed Forces, including the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), have responded to the gap by leveraging their civilian scientists, engineers and laboratories. The branches host learning sessions and competitions and promote mentorships between students and employees with jobs pertaining to STEM throughout the country.

The AEOP has been supporting STEM education for more than 50 years, according to Louie Lopez, the chief of human capital and STEM outreach at U.S. Army Research, Development Engineering Command. He said the programs leverage the Army’s research laboratories and staff in the hope of instilling STEM literacy in students, and they also hope to introduce students to potential STEM tracks inside and outside of the Army.

FIU Teaches Manufacturing Disciplines to Engineering Students

Among the more than 30,000 students attending renowned Florida International University (FIU) in Miami are some 4,000 young men and women pursuing degrees in various disciplines of engineering.  A required course for the mechanical engineering majors is Manufacturing Processes, located in the University’s Engineering Manufacturing Center, a focal point for Civil, Mechanical, Biomedical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as Engineering Management majors.   It is here that they roll up their sleeves and get into the practical side of advanced manufacturing under the guidance of the Center’s coordinator and instructor Richard Zicarelli.

 

FIU Manufacturing

What are States Doing to Recruit and Retain Employees with Cybersecurity Expertise

The threats and challenges continue to mount. Without an umbrella federal framework, government cyber experts work as best they can and with what they already have to address talent shortages and keep current with new methods of attack. Partnerships are critical in keeping abreast of the latest threats, and a future-looking mindset is necessary to create a pipeline of talent at the state and local level.

Cyberattacks have become more concrete to many of us in recent years. More citizens have received communications from governmental entities or companies about possible illicit access of our personal information—and then there are the allegations of the presidential election being influenced through sharing of hacked information.


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Competitions

Samsungs "Solve for Tomorrow" Program

Samsung Electronics America (SEA) announced the launch of the company’s 6th annual Samsung Solve for Tomorrow (#SamsungSolve) program and the call for entry submissions. Samsung’s flagship citizenship initiative is one of many innovative programs designed to address the growing education gap and career development shortage in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in the U.S. 

Samsungs "Solve for Tomorrow"

Keeping cool with insulation

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Construction
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The "Keep it Cool" activity explores how engineers have met the challenge of keeping foods, liquids, and other items cool. Students learn about heat transfer, vacuums, and insulation and design a system to keep a cup of chilled water as cool as possible for one hour. Students compare their results with that of other student teams and reflect on the lesson.  
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on the engineering behind keeping food and other items cool. Students work in teams to develop a system to make an insulated liquid container that will keep chilled water as cool as possible for an hour using everyday items. Students will need to devise a way to have a thermometer rest in the water and be able to read the temperature throughout the hour. They plan their design, execute and test their system and share their experiences with the class.
 
Lesson Activities 
Students explore how engineers have developed systems to keep liquids cool and learn about heat transfer, insulation, and vacuums. They work in a team to develop a system to keep a cup of chilled water as cool as possible for one hour using everyday materials, share and test their designs with the class and reflect on the experience.
 

Foundations

Association for Career and Technical Education

The Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE), is the largest national education association dedicated to the advancement of education that prepares youth and adults for careers. The Association for Career and Technical Education was founded in 1926. The ACTE is committed to enhancing the job performance and satisfaction of its members; to increasing public awareness and appreciation for career and technical education (CTE); and to assuring growth in local, state and federal funding for these programs by communicating and working with legislators and government leaders.

The Association for Career and Technical Education is the nation’s largest not-for-profit education association dedicated to the advancement of education that prepares youth and adults for successful careers. Founded in 1926, ACTE has more than 25,000 members; career and technical educators, administrators, researchers, guidance counselors and others involved in planning and conducting career and technical education programs at the secondary, postsecondary and adult levels. ACTE provides advocacy, public awareness and access to information on career and technical education, professional development and tools that enable members to be successful and effective leaders.

Employment