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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles Provide Real World Applications to Teach STEM

The Drone Smartz™ document is a 15-Module project to learn about UAV / Drone flying, the legal issues cited by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) & the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and common sense safety issues.  Safety should be introduced as the reoccurring theme that guides all operations for this course.  

Drone Smartz™ was written with two 7 Module segments.  The first seven Modules will involve (head knowledge) learning about drones, various legal issues, government regulations and safety.  The second seven Modules will focus on hands-on experience and allow us to differentiate between a “STEM” program focusing on secondary school students or adult occupational technology implementation. There will be midterm and final exams in this program and opportunities for between session (homework) Lab opportunities.
John Finkler

Technology in Action

Technology Phobia

All of us suffer from some sort of phobia, be it high places, closed areas, water, etc., and for most of these there is a cure. The phobia affecting many people over the past 40 to 50 years is Technology Phobia, or the uncertainty of how technology would affect their lives and their work.
Let us be honest with ourselves; all of us suffer from technology phobia to some degree or another.

Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


Click Your State For Local Information

Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

Accountability

Consider managing a grant for several hundreds of thousands of dollars over a period of 24 months whereby the grant outcomes require articulated and cohesive work to be accomplished by a collaborative party of entities. Who is held accountable? The Feds? The local fiduciary whom awarded the grant? Your boss? You? How about your front line staff? What about the local agencies and partners, cohorts and advocates? What components of the grant are clear and what is vague? Is there a contingency plan and systems in place to manage problems and stave off catastrophe?

For a time, common grant language included the phrase, “seamless and transparent services provided to the client”. Ok. But who is really responsible to make sure that happens? Maybe more importantly, who is responsible if the requirements of the grant are not met?
Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Dual Mission Education Institutes in Higher Education

As higher education faces declining enrollment numbers, reduced state funding, and accusations that it is elitist and out of reach for many Americans, university presidents, chancellors, and system heads from Wisconsin, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Arkansas, and Utah, discussed new and innovative models of education that are addressing some of higher ed’s greatest challenges and the shortage of skilled workers. The dual education model can help universities save costs by sharing staff, faculty and infrastructure (it is essentially two schools for the price of one) and keep tuition low. It also allows students who start on a community college track to easily transfer their credits if they choose to continue their studies towards an advanced degree, and to do so much more seamlessly than if they were to transfer to a different school. Additionally, its open admissions policy means more underrepresented populations are getting a shot at a degree in higher education. 

The summit was hosted by Utah Governor Gary Herbert, the Utah State Board of Regents and UVU President Matthew Holland

With higher education increasingly in the cross-hairs, the summit provided a lively and timely debate on the future of higher ed and how to provide improved access to quality programs for students across the spectrum of need and opportunity. The following are transcripts from the conversation and links to the video.


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

The Future of Ed Tech Markets

FIRST ALLIANCE represents a system of learning connecting experience, simulation, play, design, art, culture, philosophy, inventiveness, and experimentation. The Atlanta GENIUS and other FIRST ALLIANCE competitors are reflecting the future to us today.


News

Red Sox STEM Education Days Presented by CITGO

Two special days showcasing the scientific principles that shape the world and America's pastime. In its second year, the "Red Sox STEM Education Days Presented by CITGO" at Fenway Park gives students, grades two through nine, the opportunity to learn about STEM in a unique environment and to enjoy a Red Sox home game.

The first STEM Education Day, held on May 2, 2018, focused on science, weather and engineering. Pre-game activities included a STEM Fair with experiments from local organizations, an egg drop from the top of Fenway Park's historic Green Monster, and a fun coding challenge. The second STEM Education Day, scheduled for May 30, 2018, will highlight NASA and other important space initiatives. Activities will begin with a STEM Fair featuring the Johnson Space Center and Goddard Space Flight Center. These will be followed by a panel with former astronauts and current NASA professionals. In 2017, each "Red Sox STEM Education Days Presented by CITGO" hosted more than 4,000 students. 

CITGO RED SOX

$1.2 Million to Recruit Students to Become STEM Teachers

The grant from the National Science Foundation was awarded to the William & Mary, Robert Noyce Scholarship Program and allocated over five years to increase the number and diversity of students from STEM disciplines who become teachers.

The award was announced by Senators Mark R. Warner and Tim Kaine.

“Enhancing STEM education is a critical priority, and we are thrilled that William and Mary students and the National Science Foundation are partnering with schools in the local community to pursue this important endeavor,” Warner and Kaine said in a joint statement.


Preparing the Workforce to Adapt and Work Collaboratively with Robotic Solutions

Manufacturing in the U.S will build on its current strength by using “technology to empower American potential and ingenuity," according to the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM).

The institute, which is a member of Manufacturing USA, a network of regional institutes, looks to robotics to bring about the change. Robotics can “elevate, not eliminate the human roles in manufacturing,” ARM says.

The group’s mission is to help train the future workforce for the high-value careers that will determine the future of manufacturing. And it focuses on lowering the economic, technical, and operational barriers that companies experience in trying to adopt robotic technology.

Advance Robotics for Manufacturing

High School Programs Join Welding Students with Jobs in Demand

Welding labs at Elgin and Hampshire high schools now are certified testing facilities -- the first in the Midwest and among only three high schools in the country to be accredited.

Both programs are sanctioned by the American Welding Society, allowing students and community members to obtain professional certification meeting industry standards. Courses will be taught by AWS-certified instructors at the high schools.

"There is a huge demand for manufacturing grade, entry-level welders in this area," said Nick Moran, certified welding instructor at Elgin High and technical specialist for Kane County. He will train teachers at both high schools this summer to become certified welding instructors.


Study Finds LECTURERS Still Dominate STEM Education

An analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has imparted a lesson that might resonate with many students who sat through them: Enough with the lectures, already.

Published in the journal Science, the largest-ever observational study of undergraduate STEM education monitored nearly 550 faculty as they taught more than 700 courses at 25 institutions across the United States and Canada.

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Marilyne Stains and her colleagues found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted mostly of conventional lecturing, a style that prior research has identified as among the least effective at teaching and engaging students.

Lecturer STEM

BMW Investing to Expand its Training in the United States.

BMW seeks to boost the annual number of technicians who graduate from the training centers it owns by around 800, says Denise Melville, department head at BMW Group University. BMW's U.S. dealerships need to add more than 1,500 technicians each year to cover turnover and new positions.

BMW owns training centers at its headquarters in Woodcliff Lake, N.J., and in Ontario, Calif.; Schaumburg, Ill.; Atlanta; Oxnard, Calif. and Spartanburg, S.C.
 
In Atlanta, BMW is building a new campus that will quadruple its training space, Melville says. The new 12,000-square-foot site will have 12 classrooms. The renovated site in Ontario will add 12 classrooms, along with a body and paint shop. BMW also is adding training space at its New Jersey center, and a new building at the Spartanburg training facility.

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Competitions

12th Annual eCYBERMISSION Competition

The12th annual eCYBERMISSION, one of several science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) initiatives offered by the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), sponsored by the U.S. Army and administered by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), is a free online learning competition designed to cultivate student interest in STEM by encouraging students in grades six through nine to develop solutions to real-world challenges in their local communities. Students can win on a state, regional, and national level, with national winning teams receiving up to $8,000 in U.S.


Designing and solving a maze

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
math, programming, STEM, robotics
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The activity involves the design of an algorithm for solving a 4x4 simple maze. The problem statement is just to design an algorithm and implement them using flow chart. If the background of students permits the use of basic programming, implementing the algorithm in a preferred programming language is recommended. The students shall be given card or similar material to design a three dimensional simple 4x4 maze. The source and destination will be as marked in the figure (denoted by S and D respectively). They will be asked to find the route manually first. It will be followed by a discussion on what logic they have used for finding the route. They can list the conclusions derived from the discussion. Based on the conclusions, the students are asked to create an algorithm, in simple terms a ‘step by step procedure’, to solve the maze. 
 
Advanced Level: If the algorithm is verified for the given maze, the students can go forward with the implementation of the same on a preferred programming language. This will make use of basic concepts of two dimensional arrays, loops, and conditional statements. Moreover, they will be able to enjoy the real fun in solving the maze, with their basic programming skill.
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on algorithmic thinking and programming. Make the students aware of the beauty of simple algorithms and their implementation in real fun games
 
Objectives 
- Learn how to systematically analyze a problem in such a way that an algorithm can be derived to solve it
 
- Learn about the usage of such algorithms to solve real problems.
 
- Learn about applications of such algorithms to get started with the world of robotics algorithms, artificial intelligence, and so on. 
 

Foundations

The Buick Achievers Scholarship

 

Buick Achiever Scholarships will be awarded to students who excel in the classroom and give back to the community. To be eligible for the program, high school seniors or current undergraduate students must be looking to obtain a college degree in science, technology, engineering, math, also known as STEM, or other eligible fields related to the auto industry.
Created in 2011, the Buick Achievers Scholarship Program has awarded $16.5 million to students across the U.S. This year, the program will award 100 scholarships of up to $25,000 per year, renewable for up to four years, or up to five years for qualified engineering programs.
“The Buick Achievers Scholarship Program is helping students across the U.S. pay for and obtain a quality secondary education focused on STEM,” said GM Foundation President Vivian Pickard. “Through the program, we are helping to shape the next generation of leaders and innovators for the automotive industry and for other sectors important to the future success of our country.”

Employment