Electrical

Why Pursue a Career in Electronic Systems

Eventually every device that plugs in or has batteries will be part of a huge ecosystem that shares information and control with the other devices.  And we are all part of it. Doesn’t it make sense to be looking at careers that are tied directly to this technology? New challenges come on an almost daily basis as new ideas, technologies, and applications are introduced constantly.  And very few things have as big an impact as providing capabilities they never knew were possible, in a way that is easy to control and enjoy. 

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS INDUSTRY WORKFORCE UPDATE

Electronic systems could include just about anything that plugs in or has batteries. There are electronic systems in automobiles and aircraft, and even spacecraft. But in general the term is applied to low voltage systems and subsystems installed in buildings. Not to be confused with the work done by electricians, this includes low-voltage technologies such as audio, video, control systems, security and surveillance, and the infrastructure that supports these systems – copper, fiber optic, and wireless. Much of the same technology is applied to both residential and commercial projects, but used differently depending on the application. The companies who design and install these complex systems are essentially integrating several subsystems into one, so you will often see them referred to as systems integrators. The personnel who install, service, and upgrade these systems in the field are known as Electronic Systems Technicians (ESTs).

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

Companies Struggling to Recruit, Train Skilled Workers in New England

After being laid off from a sheet metal factory, Rob Pedrosa at age 32 returned to the classroom.Pedrosa lost his job in July of last year and couldn’t find another one. So the Beverly man signed up for training at the North Shore Career Center, where he hoped to pick up skills demanded by high-tech manufacturers who are struggling to find workers.

“The skills I had just weren’t transferable to electronics,” he said. “So I had to reinvent myself.” After seven months of electrical engineering classes at North Shore Community College, he landed a job with Krohne Inc. in Peabody, where he assembles components for water and sewer meters. With the economy rebounding, the job market is improving and employers across the state are hunting for new blood. But their jobs outmatch the skills of many prospective candidates — a gap that the state and businesses hope to fill with training and vocational programs.

Energy Industry 3 Million Jobs by 2020

The number of jobs in the Energy Sector will double in the next five years, according to a recent report by Manpower, the worldwide staffing company. More than half of energy employers say they are having great difficulties finding “the talent it needs.” 74 percent say the problem will get worse by 2020. The report summarizes, 'This skills gap could adversely affect our nation’s competitiveness and hurt the record-setting growth seen in the energy and manufacturing sectors unless immediate steps are taken to better educate young Americans in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).


The Creating Quality Technical Educators Act of 2014

The Senate Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, introduced the Creating Quality Technical Educators Act that would create a CTE teacher-training grant partnership to recruit and train high-quality CTE teachers. The Creating Quality Technical Educators Act grant would foster partnerships between high-needs secondary schools and post-secondary institutions to create one-year teacher residencies for CTE teachers. Through grants in the Higher Education and Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA), many teacher residency partnerships already exist between post-secondary institutions and local schools to train prospective educators, but none are CTE focused.

CTE teacher residencies created through the Creating Quality Technical Educators Act would target mid-career professionals in related technical fields, as well as recent college graduates, veterans or currently licensed teachers with a desire to transition to a CTE focus.

The Solar Water Still Challenge

The world land area affected by questionable drinking water sources is staggering in size. According to the World Health Organization, about 1.2 billion people do not have safe clean water sources. This should not be allowed to continue. A possible solution is to use a solar water still to distill water on site. The problem is the current cost of $200 to $250 US dollars, when many of these families only earn a few dollars per day.

Solar Still

New Green Academy Program Builds Synergy Among Industry Partners and Schools

Just launched, ETA International’s Green Academy will be a collaborative effort for both schools that are approved to utilize ETA alternative energy certifications and industry partners who offer training or are looking to hire students.“We hear from schools each day who are entering the alternative energy market and including their lo


Manufacturing in the Future

Manufacturing is one of the most important factors to the economy of a country because it affects the wealth of a country and the standard of living its people enjoy. You only have to look at any number of countries and if they have a strong manufacturing base, they in turn also have a high standard of living. If it were possible to gaze into a crystal ball and look into the future of manufacturing, many amazing things are happening now and will happen in the near future. The use of the Internet will continue to play a major role in how manufacturing is conducted throughout the world. Some of the Web-based technologies such as machine tool control, machine diagnostics online, e-Procurement, e-Manufacturing, Virtual Reality and Simulation, etc., are available now. Investments being made now in new technology will pay huge dividends in product quality, increased productivity, decreased time to market, reduced manufacturing costs in the future.  
Author: 
Steve Krar

Alternative energy transition won't be as smooth as advertised

We know that we need alternatives to coal and other fossil fuels, so what's the holdup? The U.S. News and World Report says a myriad of issues make what is assumed to be a gradual transition into something a little bit more complicated.
One thing holding up energy companies is an unwillingness by our legislators to commit to sweeping national policy.
From the article:


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