Manufacturing

Michigan Tackles the Challenges of Skills and Educator Gap

At the direction of Gov. Rick Snyder and the goals and strategies set forth by the Building Michigan’s 21st Century Economic report and the 21st Century Michigan Education Commission, we’re taking a holistic approach to elevating all pathways to good-paying careers in Michigan, especially those in the professional trades. We need to close our state’s talent gap, caused, in part, by a career awareness gap. Too many students are unaware of, and don’t always have access to, all the pathways leading to rewarding and good-paying careers.


Colleges Filling Skills Gap by Including Hands-On Training as Part of Curriculum

Change in Education must start at the University level. The following Institutions of Higher Education are leading the way. The NY Times is covering the story. “The economy and employers have changed,” said Louis Soares, vice president of the American Council on Education. “They want you to come in with a hot skill set, ready to go. Colleges are paying attention at different levels to what that means and trying to develop programs.” 

Some are doing that better than others. “Some institutions are very good,” said Gary Burtless, an economist with the Brookings Institution. “They have their ear to the ground, they’re listening to local employers and paying attention to what they need.”

 

Case Western Reserve University

 

Creating 15- or 18-credit minors may be one of the more effective strategies for preparing students to enter high-demand fields. Because a minor requires fewer credits than a major and few, if any, prerequisites, these allow colleges to be more flexible and responsive to changing industries and emerging technologies.


FIU Teaches Manufacturing Disciplines to Engineering Students

Among the more than 30,000 students attending renowned Florida International University (FIU) in Miami are some 4,000 young men and women pursuing degrees in various disciplines of engineering.  A required course for the mechanical engineering majors is Manufacturing Processes, located in the University’s Engineering Manufacturing Center, a focal point for Civil, Mechanical, Biomedical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as Engineering Management majors.   It is here that they roll up their sleeves and get into the practical side of advanced manufacturing under the guidance of the Center’s coordinator and instructor Richard Zicarelli.

 

FIU Manufacturing

"Going Pro" in Michigan. State Agency's Join Resources to Promote CTE and Fill the Skills Gap

“Going PRO” is a Michigan campaign designed to elevate the perception of professional trades and to showcase opportunities in a variety of rewarding careers.

A sizable professional trades shortage exists in Michigan and is expected to continue through 2024. Professional trades will account for more than 500,000 jobs in the Michigan economy, and approximately 15,000 new job openings are expected annually in the state during that time.

Wages for professional trades occupations is 45 percent higher than other occupations – $51,000 is the median annual salary for these jobs!

Opportunities exist in a variety of emerging industries including IT, healthcare, advanced manufacturing, construction and automotive. And many of the career fields do not require a four-year degree.

Go Pro Michigan

Work in the Automation Age: Sustainable Careers Today and Into the Future

80% of manufacturers report a shortage of qualified applicants for skilled production positions, and the shortage could cost U.S. manufacturers 11% of their annual earnings. Manufacturing executives reported an average of 94 days to recruit engineering and research employees and 70 days to recruit skilled production workers. The skills gap is driving up what are already above average wages and benefits in U.S. manufacturing. Studies show an increasing skills gap with as many as two million jobs going unfilled in the manufacturing industry alone in the next decade.

The Association for Advancing Automation (http://www.a3automate.org) (A3) explores the impact of automation on the ever-evolving job market and the growing shortage of skilled employees with experience and training in advanced technologies. A3 examines the types of jobs that are going unfilled and reviews workforce development initiatives, including education, apprenticeships, and on-the-job training that will fill labor shortages and support ongoing economic growth and productivity. http://www.a3automate.org/work-in-the-automation-age-white-paper/

Working in the Automation Age

Makin' the MAKERSPACE

There is tremendous buzz lately about setting up a makerspace. Thankfully, educators, policy makers (for some reason they are not always one and the same?) administrators and the education community in general are realizing that in order to really cultivate metacognition and real-world skills, we need hands-on, project-based learning. Object-based learning is making a comeback, and teachers are connecting lessons back to the industry, creating a more vocational education. A big part of this movement towards active learning and STEM is creating a makerspace in the classroom.

Gittel Grant

Manufacturing Jobs in Reading Pennsylvania

In a lab at Reading Area Community College, Benjamin Eckenrode stands in front of a blue wall rigged with pistons, pumps and gauges. It’s a pneumatic troubleshooting system, designed to teach students how to identify and solve problems with manufacturing equipment.Eckenrode’s assignment is to figure out why the piston isn’t moving. The high school senior is taking this college class as part of a program to prepare more young people for careers in the technical trades.

It’s still possible to get an entry-level factory job with just a diploma paying maybe $17 an hour, said Bonnie Spayd, executive director of the Schmidt Technology and Training Center at the college. But with a little extra training, her students can make $20 to $30 an hour, plus benefits

Reading Area Community College

President Trump Meeting with Manufacturing CEO's

Bringing manufacturing back to America, creating high-wage jobs was one of our campaign promises and themes, and it resonated with everybody.  It was really something what happened.  States that hadn’t been won in many, many years were -- they came over to our fold.  A lot of it had to do with the jobs, and other reasons -- but jobs.  And I'm delivering on everything that we've said.  In fact, people are saying they've never seen so much happen in 30 days of a presidency.  We've delivered on a lot.  And I think Mark can explain, and Mark can probably say some of the things we're doing for the auto industry.  We're going to be doing for many of the industries.

As you know, the United States lost one-third of our manufacturing jobs since NAFTA.  That's an unbelievable number and statistic.  And 70,000 factories closed since China joined the WTO -- 70,000 factories. 

Trump

IBM CEO Wants to Help Trump Create New Jobs in America

Rometty urged Trump in a letter to focus his job-creation efforts on vocational training for young workers.

"Let's work together to scale up this approach of vocational training, creating a national corps of skilled workers trained to take the 'new collar' IT jobs that are in demand here in America," Rometty wrote in the letter that was first reported by CNBC.

 

Trump too has advocated for more job training, something he and President Obama seem to agree on.

Obama has spent a record $265 million on apprenticeship programs in the last two fiscal years, according to the Commerce Department.

 


SME Launches High School Membership Program to Build the Manufacturing Workforce Pipeline

"With an anticipated skills gap of 2 million jobs by 2025, the manufacturing industry needs to attract and inspire the next-generation workforce." SME, an organization that trains and develops the manufacturing workforce, has launched a high school membership program to educate the next generation on the value of manufacturing and encourage careers in the field. Manufacturing offers career opportunities for every education level ranging from skilled trades that require a high school diploma or GED to engineers, designers and programmers with bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as researchers and scientists with doctorates. There are currently more than 600,000 jobs available in manufacturing, with the expectation that number could grow to 2 million by 2025 because of an aging workforce and new technologies creating more jobs.

“Manufacturing needs to attract the next generation of talent,” said Christopher Wojcik, vice president of SME Membership. “SME is dedicated to educating students on the career opportunities in manufacturing; our high school student membership is a program to help the future workforce better understand the industry and ultimately fill the workforce pipeline.”


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