Manufacturing

Training our Next Workforce Through University, Community College and Career Center Collaboration

The Institute of Agricultural Technology, at Michigan State University, Lansing Community College’s Technical Careers Division and Ingham Intermediate School District’s Wilson Talent Center are preparing the region's next workforce.

The Institute offers nine certificate programs, ranging from landscape and nursery management to livestock industries to turf grass management.

“Students are taking the same courses as bachelor degree students are, even though they’re in the certificate program,” said Erin Bosch, agricultural industries coordinator at the institute. “They’re taking the 100- and 200-level courses to gain knowledge in the industry, to then go, and either immediately get into the workforce, or a percentage of students transfer into the bachelor degree program.”


Measuring CTE Outcomes - Trained, Credentialed, Placed

Without outcomes, CTE is just another elective,” said Dr. Sally Downey, superintendent of the East Valley Institute of Technology, which provides over 40 CTE programs for high school students and adults.

“CTE outcomes shouldn’t be difficult to measure,” Downey said. “Did the student complete their program and earn an industry credential or license? Did they get a job related to their CTE program? Did they go to college or join the military? All of those things are measureable. But the devil is always in the details, especially when those details involve taxpayer dollars and politics.”

In 2013, the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University published what many considered to be the first comprehensive look at CTE in the Grand Canyon state.


Perkins Act - Changes and Opportunities - Including STEM

While the measure was signed into law on July 31, 2018, Perkins V will go into effect on July 1, 2019.

Over the next few months, states will be writing transition plans, which will cover the first year of the law’s implementation (July 1, 2019- June 30, 2020). Full four-year state and local plans, covering all the requirements of the act, will be submitted in spring 2020 (encompassing program years July 1, 2020-June 30, 2024).

The law would authorize $1.229 billion for FY 2019 and gradually increase this authorization level to $1.318 billion in FY 2024, which represents a 10.57 percent increase over the course of the act compared to the amount Congress allocated to the Perkins Basic State Grant program in FY 2018.

Michigan Technological University and Bay de Noc Community College Collaborate to Prep Students for Industry

How can one educational program teach all the skill sets industry requires? Michigan Tech has designed a way.

Industry is not a monolith.  One employer needs to hire people with electrical skills. Another is looking for employees who understand fluid power systems.  A third needs someone who can read blueprints. How can one educational program meet all their needs?

Partnering with Bay de Noc Community College and funded by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Labor, state agencies and industry, Michigan Technological University has helped craft an educational program to meet industry’s needs. It’s an initiative in industrial automation, robotics and controls to help students earn credentials from certificates to associate degrees to bachelor’s degrees. The development of the tools and curriculum will prepare Michigan Tech students to join the workforce.  

Michigan Tech

$75,000 per Year with Benefits; No College Needed

Miami is a city with an ever changing skyline. And those who make it happen — the plumbers, electricians, brick masons and carpenters — earn far above the local median: $55,000-75,000 a year with full benefits and a pension.

But as the economy barrels toward full employment, local contractors are struggling to find enough skilled workers to fuel the construction boom.

“We’re seeing it across the board. There are shortages in every trade,” said Peter Dyga, president of the South Florida-based Florida East Coast Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors, a non-profit trade organization comprised of several construction firms and contractors.

Associated Builders and Contractors

A New U: Faster + Cheaper Alternatives to College

Every year, the cost of a four-year degree goes up, and the value goes down. But for many students, there’s a better answer. 

So many things are getting faster and cheaper. Movies stream into your living room, without ticket or concession-stand costs. The world’s libraries are at your fingertips instantly, and for free. 

So why is a college education the only thing that seems immune to change? Colleges and universities operate much as they did 40 years ago, with one major exception: they’ve gotten dramatically more expensive. And they’ve actually gotten slower, with the average time to graduate now over five years. 

As a result, graduates often struggle with enormous debt burdens. Even worse, they often find that degrees did not prepare them to obtain and succeed at good jobs in growing sectors of the economy. Parents and students have accepted this because a college degree has been seen as a prerequisite to a professional career. But now, for the first time, there are real alternatives. 

A New You

ONE and DONE, Workforce Development at Houston Community College

Houston Community College is pioneering a program to ensure students earn a level one certificate, receive resume writing assistance and get help with job interviews in just one semester.  The “Take One & Done” program is being offered at HCC’s Southeast College Eastside Campus.

“Students come full time and we will provide financial aid, child care from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. if necessary, and they will get a level one certificate in one of seven programs,” says Melissa Gonzalez, president of Southeast College. “We looked specifically at these programs, where there are jobs and there is a demand for workers.”

“Take One and Done” includes level one certificates in:

  1. Welding Technology-Basic Welding Helper
  2. Construction Management Technology
  3. Industrial Electricity Electrical Helper
  4. Business Management-Insurance Specialist/Associate
  5. Logistics & Supply Chain Management - Maritime Logistics & Specialist
  6. Real Estate - Residential
  7. HVAC

Silicon Valley Companies Encouraging Local Student to Aspire for High-Tech Jobs

Internships, contests and engineering coursework give teens from the area’s majority-Latino high schools an entree to STEM careers. 

Most students at the high school, on San Jose’s East Side in the southern end of Silicon Valley, are from Mexican immigrant families. Nearly all will be the first in their families to go to college; some will be the first to complete high school. The kids who grow up in Silicon Valley’s Latino neighborhoods, the children of groundskeepers, janitors, cooks and construction workers, rarely get a shot at high-paying, high-tech jobs. Just 4.7 percent of the Valley’s tech professionals are Latino and 2.2 percent are African-American, according to 2015 data from the American Community Survey. By contrast, 57 percent are foreign-born, with many coming from India and China, a local industry group estimates.

Silicon Valley STEM

"What's So Cool About Manufacturing," Contest in Pennsylvania

While there are many initiatives across the country to encourage young students to study STEM subjects and pursue technical careers, one effort does this in a way that pairs learning about manufacturing with developing video production skills. The “What’s So Cool About Manufacturing?” contest is an annual event that allows students from across the state of Pennsylvania to explore different career options in manufacturing by meeting with a local company, and then creating and filming a video that explores that company’s products and services. This opportunity provides the students with experience in planning, scripting, and shooting video content, while at the same time exposes them to what it is like to work in the manufacturing industry, and the different types of career options offered.
 
The contest, which is funded under a 2013 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community & Economic Development’s “Discovered in PA, Developed in PA” program, was created by the Manufacturer’s Resource Center (MRC) and provides students and their teachers (who function as coaches) with camera equipment and video production software to use in creating their entries. The contest has expanded to a total of eleven additional states under the Dream It. Do It. brand that was created by the Manufacturing Institute in Washington, DC.
 
What's So Cool About Manufacturing

Business Community Aims to Increase Employer Investment in Workforce Training

“Quality Pathways: Employer Leadership in Earn and Learn Opportunities,” highlights the importance of employer leadership in developing a growing workforce that meets the needs of a modernizing United States economy.
 
“Last year, President Trump charged the business community with finding solutions to help close the skills gap and connect workers with opportunities to develop skills they need to be successful in a 21st century economy,” said U.S. Chamber President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue. “By putting forward this solution, the U.S. business community isn’t sitting on the sidelines – we’re leading the way. Together, we’ve developed a bold solution to improve employer leadership and investment in quality on-the-job learning opportunities. We look forward to implementing this model across the country so today’s students are prepared to be the workers and business leaders of the future.”
 
“Quality Pathways” aims to empower both learners and employers by establishing a business-led recognition system for high-quality earn and learn opportunities based on business best-practices. Creating employer-led earn and learn pathways will also help build stronger connections between employers and their workforce and close the skills gap by connecting job creators with more ready-to-work Americans. To ensure long-term sustainability and success of the system, the paper also calls for an ongoing process to organize businesses across industries.
Quality Pathways

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